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rvacountrysinger
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03 Nov 2014, 8:03 pm

I was wondering. I have some Native American ancestry in Cherokee and Powhatan and Mattaponi Indian. Some folks say I dont look Native at all, and other people say I do a little . What do y'all think?

Here is a picture or two..

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DeepHour
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03 Nov 2014, 8:09 pm

I'd say there's at least a 10% Native American look there.



beneficii
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03 Nov 2014, 8:15 pm

Definitely.


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03 Nov 2014, 8:17 pm

i can see some ancestry.


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03 Nov 2014, 8:17 pm

It's hard to say.

Do you know any more details about your ancestry? Are you able to trace it to a specific ancestor, or do you only know you have 'some Native American ancestry'?

For example, I'm 1/8th Amerind, my grandmother is of Abenaki descent. I don't "look native" though.

When I was younger I had a friend who was Iroquois, lived in Brantford and both his parents identified as 'native' and looked like one assumes Amerind people to look; despite this he was the most WASPy looking native I've ever met. Blond/red hair, blue eyes, freckles, white complexion. It's 100% certain he was partially of European heritage since eastern Amerind people are pretty likely to have some degree of European heritage, but his parents and grandparents looked much more 'Amerind' than 'white'.

The 'Crying Indian' from the anti-littering ads was a white/Sicilian guy. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Iron_Eyes_Cody

Considering it was very common for whites with some black ancestry to claim 'native ancestry' (or more commonly Cherokee in particular) instead in the US, especially in the south, if you lack specific details as to who these native ancestors were, you may wish to look into genetic testing to confirm your ancestry.


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Last edited by funeralxempire on 03 Nov 2014, 8:33 pm, edited 1 time in total.

naturalplastic
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03 Nov 2014, 8:32 pm

Definetly look like you have some Native American ancestry.



beneficii
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03 Nov 2014, 9:03 pm

funeralxempire wrote:
Considering it was very common for whites with some black ancestry to claim 'native ancestry' (or more commonly Cherokee in particular) instead in the US, especially in the south, if you lack specific details as to who these native ancestors were, you may wish to look into genetic testing to confirm your ancestry.


Yes, because if your "white" family's been in the south for a while, chances are you have some black ancestry.


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funeralxempire
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03 Nov 2014, 9:05 pm

beneficii wrote:
funeralxempire wrote:
Considering it was very common for whites with some black ancestry to claim 'native ancestry' (or more commonly Cherokee in particular) instead in the US, especially in the south, if you lack specific details as to who these native ancestors were, you may wish to look into genetic testing to confirm your ancestry.


Yes, because if your "white" family's been in the south for a while, chances are you have some black ancestry.


And likely will try to misrepresent it as something else due to cultural perceptions and the one-drop law.


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03 Nov 2014, 9:24 pm

maybe the eyes - but why does it matter??



rvacountrysinger
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03 Nov 2014, 9:36 pm

beneficii wrote:
funeralxempire wrote:
Considering it was very common for whites with some black ancestry to claim 'native ancestry' (or more commonly Cherokee in particular) instead in the US, especially in the south, if you lack specific details as to who these native ancestors were, you may wish to look into genetic testing to confirm your ancestry.


Yes, because if your "white" family's been in the south for a while, chances are you have some black ancestry.
\

That's not really even close to being true.



rvacountrysinger
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03 Nov 2014, 9:38 pm

funeralxempire wrote:
It's hard to say.

Do you know any more details about your ancestry? Are you able to trace it to a specific ancestor, or do you only know you have 'some Native American ancestry'?

For example, I'm 1/8th Amerind, my grandmother is of Abenaki descent. I don't "look native" though.

When I was younger I had a friend who was Iroquois, lived in Brantford and both his parents identified as 'native' and looked like one assumes Amerind people to look; despite this he was the most WASPy looking native I've ever met. Blond/red hair, blue eyes, freckles, white complexion. It's 100% certain he was partially of European heritage since eastern Amerind people are pretty likely to have some degree of European heritage, but his parents and grandparents looked much more 'Amerind' than 'white'.

The 'Crying Indian' from the anti-littering ads was a white/Sicilian guy. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Iron_Eyes_Cody

Considering it was very common for whites with some black ancestry to claim 'native ancestry' (or more commonly Cherokee in particular) instead in the US, especially in the south, if you lack specific details as to who these native ancestors were, you may wish to look into genetic testing to confirm your ancestry.


Okay, most white people in the South are not black. ancestry. Im not sure what you mean there. But I am connected to Pocohantas. My great great grandmother from Arkansas was where I trace Cherokee. I know people think its cliche to claim Cherokee- but Cherokees were the largest tribe- especially in the Southern states. Its a lot more common to be Cherokee than anything else.



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03 Nov 2014, 9:44 pm

rvacountrysinger wrote:
funeralxempire wrote:
It's hard to say.

Do you know any more details about your ancestry? Are you able to trace it to a specific ancestor, or do you only know you have 'some Native American ancestry'?

For example, I'm 1/8th Amerind, my grandmother is of Abenaki descent. I don't "look native" though.

When I was younger I had a friend who was Iroquois, lived in Brantford and both his parents identified as 'native' and looked like one assumes Amerind people to look; despite this he was the most WASPy looking native I've ever met. Blond/red hair, blue eyes, freckles, white complexion. It's 100% certain he was partially of European heritage since eastern Amerind people are pretty likely to have some degree of European heritage, but his parents and grandparents looked much more 'Amerind' than 'white'.

The 'Crying Indian' from the anti-littering ads was a white/Sicilian guy. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Iron_Eyes_Cody

Considering it was very common for whites with some black ancestry to claim 'native ancestry' (or more commonly Cherokee in particular) instead in the US, especially in the south, if you lack specific details as to who these native ancestors were, you may wish to look into genetic testing to confirm your ancestry.


Okay, most white people in the South are not black. ancestry. Im not sure what you mean there. But I am connected to Pocohantas. My great great grandmother from Arkansas was where I trace Cherokee. I know people think its cliche to claim Cherokee- but Cherokees were the largest tribe- especially in the Southern states. Its a lot more common to be Cherokee than anything else.


I still don't understand why it matters.



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03 Nov 2014, 10:13 pm

rvacountrysinger wrote:
Okay, most white people in the South are not black. ancestry.


Here?s how Scott Hadly reported Kasia Bryc?s findings on the 23andme website on March 4, 2014: ?Bryc found that about 4 percent of whites have at least 1 percent or more of African ancestry, known as ??hidden African ancestry.??

?Although it is a relatively small percentage,? Hadly continues, ?the percentage indicates that an individual with at least 1 percent African ancestry had an African ancestor within the last six generations, or in the last 200 years [meaning since the time of American slavery]. This data also suggests that individuals with mixed parentage at some point were absorbed into the white population,? which is a very polite way of saying that they ?passed.?


Source: http://www.theroot.com/articles/history ... estry.html

Since admitting black ancestry was frowned upon, many southerns with black ancestry claimed instead to have distant Amerind ancestry.

You may be part Cherokee, you might be part black, you might have both, you might have neither. Looking at your picture won't determine it, but a genetic test would. If you want to know about your origins have a test performed.


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Last edited by funeralxempire on 03 Nov 2014, 10:39 pm, edited 1 time in total.

C_Sharp
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03 Nov 2014, 10:28 pm

I agree with the above post. Until you take a genetic test, or are otherwise able to trace accurately your family it is anyone's guess as to whether or not one could have Native american ancestry. Looks alone won't cut it. It is not unheard of for African Americans to have European ancestry too, so even skin color is not a reliable guide.

I myself have a little Mayan ancestry on my father's side via his grandmother. But otherwise I'm probably mostly of European descent.



beneficii
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04 Nov 2014, 8:42 pm

C_Sharp wrote:
I agree with the above post. Until you take a genetic test, or are otherwise able to trace accurately your family it is anyone's guess as to whether or not one could have Native american ancestry. Looks alone won't cut it. It is not unheard of for African Americans to have European ancestry too, so even skin color is not a reliable guide.

I myself have a little Mayan ancestry on my father's side via his grandmother. But otherwise I'm probably mostly of European descent.


As far back as I've been able to look, I'm European, too, but my mum's side of the family has deep roots in the south, so I wouldn't be surprised to see some African mixed in. My dad's side, on the other hand, comes from the north. I traced my male lineage up to a William Butler who was born in 1831 in Canada and immigrated to the United States, settling in Webster County, Iowa. I can find nothing further back.


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