How old is too old to not have a career yet?

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ASS-P
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06 May 2015, 2:42 pm

...I have none :( :cry: .


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Cartier
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06 May 2015, 4:34 pm

Quote:
get you hired at a job that pays minimum-wage, or just a job that will not pay you enough to put food on the table, pay all of your bills for the rest of your life, etc.

I'm asking that when did it start to become expected of decent paying jobs, jobs that pay significantly above minimum-wage, start to expect their prospective candidates to be college educated? hopefully you get what i'm saying, it's kinda hard to put this into words.


It hasn't happened yet, at least not in America, where less than 1/3 of adults have a 4-year college degree. Median income for 25-34 year olds with only a high school diploma is $35,000 and median income for the same cohort with a two-year community college certificate/diploma is $40,000, sez the Institute of Education Sciences.



WantToHaveALife
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29 Jun 2015, 2:57 pm

Cartier wrote:
Quote:
get you hired at a job that pays minimum-wage, or just a job that will not pay you enough to put food on the table, pay all of your bills for the rest of your life, etc.

I'm asking that when did it start to become expected of decent paying jobs, jobs that pay significantly above minimum-wage, start to expect their prospective candidates to be college educated? hopefully you get what i'm saying, it's kinda hard to put this into words.


It hasn't happened yet, at least not in America, where less than 1/3 of adults have a 4-year college degree. Median income for 25-34 year olds with only a high school diploma is $35,000 and median income for the same cohort with a two-year community college certificate/diploma is $40,000, sez the Institute of Education Sciences.


I wonder if its common for a lot of people to lack ambition, lack the motivation to be career-oriented, become independent and financially stable when they are lacking in their social life and dating life/sex life.



StackedAces
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30 Jun 2015, 4:02 am

I'm 24 and still haven't decided what I want to do when I grow up. Does that make me a loser?
Well, I'm not entirely sure. But I do know this much, I have seen and done things and been places
that most people NT or not will never. And it's thanks to my indecision... it's let to interesting jobs.
All I'm trying to say is that's it's different strokes.



WantToHaveALife
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30 Jun 2015, 5:36 am

StackedAces wrote:
I'm 24 and still haven't decided what I want to do when I grow up. Does that make me a loser?
Well, I'm not entirely sure. But I do know this much, I have seen and done things and been places
that most people NT or not will never. And it's thanks to my indecision... it's let to interesting jobs.
All I'm trying to say is that's it's different strokes.


ya i'm 27 and I have a minimum-wage job at a grocery store, sometimes I feel like a loser, yes I know this is ultimately my responsibility, I guess I have naturally lacked ambition, no clue as to why.



xenocity
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30 Jun 2015, 9:46 am

StackedAces wrote:
I'm 24 and still haven't decided what I want to do when I grow up. Does that make me a loser?
Well, I'm not entirely sure. But I do know this much, I have seen and done things and been places
that most people NT or not will never. And it's thanks to my indecision... it's let to interesting jobs.
All I'm trying to say is that's it's different strokes.

No, not at all.
Hell even if were career driven, there is no guarantee you'd land that job due to the current mess job market is in.


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kraftiekortie
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30 Jun 2015, 2:33 pm

I'm 54, and I don't have a career yet.

I have a job, though.

When I retire from this job, I want to pursue a CAREER in transitional assistance for autistic people on the cusp of independence.



BirdInFlight
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30 Jun 2015, 2:45 pm

kraftiekortie wrote:
I'm 54, and I don't have a career yet.

I have a job, though.

When I retire from this job, I want to pursue a CAREER in transitional assistance for autistic people on the cusp of independence.


Wow kraftie, that is such a great goal!

As for careers and when is too late -- to anyone wondering that, there are a great many people in the arts who started late or only achieved a working career later in life from their art form. Many novelists, actors, directors. Zelda Rubinstein, the psychic character in the original "Poltergeist," gave up a steady job to start an acting career at the age of 47. Danny Aiello was 40 when he started his career in acting.

You're never too old to do anything you would really like to pursue doing, as long as biology will allow. It's never too late to go back to school, start a new path in life, get qualified for something new, start up a business and become self employed, learn a trade, write a book, etc.


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kraftiekortie
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30 Jun 2015, 2:48 pm

Birdie: you're SOARING today!



BirdInFlight
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30 Jun 2015, 3:01 pm

kraftiekortie wrote:
Birdie: you're SOARING today!


Oh stop, haha!

Now....if I could only take my own advice....LOL! :lol:


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If you have a problem with something I post, something I believe, something I do or say, something in my sig, or something I am stupid enough to share that I'm struggling with and being caused pain by -- TELL ME TO MY FACE so that I can defend myself, instead of see you make a mockery of or a dig about it later.

On the other hand, friends will never need an explanation, and enemies bent on disliking me will never accept one.

ASD Level 1, PTSD. Plus anxiety with panic attacks, mild sub-clinical situational depression -- and a massive case of sheer freakin' BURNOUT.

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kraftiekortie
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30 Jun 2015, 3:18 pm

Yep...me too! :wink:



TheSpectrum
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30 Jun 2015, 3:22 pm

Until a year ago I didn't start a career path despite having lots of work experience.
A friend of mine opened a gallery and pub in the last year and he's moving onto bigger things already (he's in his mid 30's).

I think what is important is not when you start in life but how and why.
There is a lot of passion and skill behind a career. It's not just completing another task or doing another job and taking money home. It essentially becomes your life or at the very least a core part of your life. That's what separates it from other work or jobs.

You don't need a career to be happy, but if you want a career start at a point that makes you happy to begin with and have enough motivation to be skilled at whatever it is you're doing.

I hope that was useful and wasn't too vague but TL;DR is you're never too old.


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01 Jul 2015, 11:24 pm

I wouldn't say any age is really too old. I have a couple of friends who actually went to college when their kids graduated high school and are now having a career in their "second life" as nurses. People are living longer now and the retirement age has been raised, so starting out at a career late in life isn't unusual anymore. I'm 51 and went to college twice but dropped out both times and now that my youngest has graduated high school, if there was something I really wanted to do I'd go back to school and do it. The only thing I can think of that I probably couldn't do now would be medical school. They wouldn't let me in, I'm sure. I'm too old to go through all those years of school and then do a residency and fellowship and then practice medicine. The spot in school would best be given to someone younger with more years of actual work ahead of them. And now, I don't think it's ageism on their part for that.


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Lakif
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04 Jul 2015, 4:44 am

I'm also a late bloomer. Won't get my Accountancy degree until next year and have very sketchy job history, with only my internship as relevant work experience in my field. I do wish I'd done the degree years ago.

I'm less bothered by my relatively under-developed career than I am about lack of progress with the opposite sex, which probably echoes what the OP was saying.



WantToHaveALife
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09 Jul 2015, 5:34 pm

TheSpectrum wrote:
Until a year ago I didn't start a career path despite having lots of work experience.
A friend of mine opened a gallery and pub in the last year and he's moving onto bigger things already (he's in his mid 30's).

I think what is important is not when you start in life but how and why.
There is a lot of passion and skill behind a career. It's not just completing another task or doing another job and taking money home. It essentially becomes your life or at the very least a core part of your life. That's what separates it from other work or jobs.

You don't need a career to be happy, but if you want a career start at a point that makes you happy to begin with and have enough motivation to be skilled at whatever it is you're doing.

I hope that was useful and wasn't too vague but TL;DR is you're never too old.


even though people always say you should do it solely for yourself, not for others, but I believe it's natural to want to be respected and admired, be attractive to others, and unfortuneately, it still seems men are defined, valued by what they are doing with their lives or where they are headed in life, what they have done with their lives.