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Fnord
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16 Dec 2014, 7:28 am

886 wrote:
My birth was normal and I'm a poster child for autism :|

Same here.

All these efforts to link Autism with single events are troubling. For every one of the different type of births mentioned in this thread as correlating to Autism, there must be 50 or more of the same types of births for which Autism is not a correlative result.

Can we get a little scientific here, please?


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Zajie
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16 Dec 2014, 7:31 am

I was born a few weeks before my birthdate, I was also very small in size.



Norny
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16 Dec 2014, 7:38 am

Fnord wrote:
886 wrote:
My birth was normal and I'm a poster child for autism :|

Same here.

All these efforts to link Autism with single events are troubling. For every one of the different type of births mentioned in this thread as correlating to Autism, there must be 50 or more of the same types of births for which Autism is not a correlative result.

Can we get a little scientific here, please?


When you came out of your mum you didn't receive a birth certificate, instead you were given a birth scientificate. :rambo:


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r2d2
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16 Dec 2014, 7:50 am

Fnord wrote:
886 wrote:

All these efforts to link Autism with single events are troubling. For every one of the different type of births mentioned in this thread as correlating to Autism, there must be 50 or more of the same types of births for which Autism is not a correlative result.

Can we get a little scientific here, please?


The scientific consensus does support an increased prevalence of autism with traumatic births, prenatal and neonatal problems:


Epidemiologists from Harvard University and Brown University conducted the "meta-analysis," which sorted through and combined the results of 60 studies that explored autism prevalence as a function of many birth and neonatal factors. Such analyses help discern how strong the links are between autism and each of those factors and allows researchers to rank how powerfully different factors can influence the risk of developing a given disorder. The same group of researchers established in 2009 that advanced maternal and paternal age was a strong prenatal risk factor for autism, as was a mother's bleeding during pregnancy and gestational diabetes.

The researchers, led by Harvard School of Public Health's Hannah Gardener, underscored that having a difficult birth may amplify a child's established genetic risk or may confer risk of the neurodevelopmental disorder all by itself. But they made clear that the baby who suffers a combinations of birth difficulties will likely have higher risks than a baby with only one. Their study comes in the wake of new research that downplays the role of genetics in autism.

"The obstetrical risk factors that have emerged as significant risk factors for autism in the current meta-analysis suggest a possible role of fetal and neonatal hypoxia," the authors note . A disruption of oxygen to the growing fetus seems to prompt a burst of activity in the cells that rely on the neurotransmitter dopamine, the authors note. And there is evidence that those with autism have unusual activity in those same cells.

The factors that appeared to contribute most strongly to a baby's autism risk were birth injury or trauma maternal hemorrhage, being four or more weeks premature at birth, birth weight of 2,000 grams (about 4 pounds, 6 ounces) or less, being in breech or another abnormal birth position, having a congenital malformation and having a low Apgar score at five minutes.

http://articles.latimes.com/2011/jul/11/news/la-heb-autism-difficult-birth-20110711


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Last edited by r2d2 on 16 Dec 2014, 8:00 am, edited 1 time in total.

Edna3362
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16 Dec 2014, 7:58 am

My birth is normal, and I'm an aspie. There were no complications I asked.
My sister's birth ended on a c-section because she was on a transverse birth position, and she's an NT. My mom ended up worse to 50-50. She's also 31 years old that time. Funny isn't? XD

And genes? Not so much. I barely know it on either sides.. But I might have suspected that at least one of my (direct) grandfathers is somewhat in the spectrum... But they're both gone already. :(


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r2d2
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16 Dec 2014, 8:26 am

Here is the study from the medical Journal "Pediatrics" -The official journal of the American Academy of Pediatrics.

Perinatal and Neonatal Risk Factors for Autism: A Comprehensive Meta-analysis

Hannah Gardener, ScDa,
Donna Spiegelman, ScDa,b,
Stephen L. Buka, ScDc

snip:


RESULTS: Over 60 perinatal and neonatal factors were examined. Factors associated with autism risk in the meta-analysis were abnormal presentation, umbilical-cord complications, fetal distress, birth injury or trauma, multiple birth, maternal hemorrhage, summer birth, low birth weight, small for gestational age, congenital malformation, low 5-minute Apgar score, feeding difficulties, meconium aspiration, neonatal anemia, ABO or Rh incompatibility, and hyperbilirubinemia. Factors not associated with autism risk included anesthesia, assisted vaginal delivery, postterm birth, high birth weight, and head circumference.


CONCLUSIONS: There is insufficient evidence to implicate any 1 perinatal or neonatal factor in autism etiology, although there is some evidence to suggest that exposure to a broad class of conditions reflecting general compromises to perinatal and neonatal health may increase the risk. Methodological variations were likely sources of heterogeneity of risk factor effects across studies.

read study:

http://pediatrics.aappublications.org/content/128/2/344.full?sid=89bf23c4-2b25-4b3f-8729-1fa5935e20d3


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Fnord
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16 Dec 2014, 9:02 am

r2d2 wrote:
CONCLUSIONS: There is insufficient evidence to implicate any 1 perinatal or neonatal factor in autism etiology, although there is some evidence to suggest that exposure to a broad class of conditions reflecting general compromises to perinatal and neonatal health may increase the risk. Methodological variations were likely sources of heterogeneity of risk factor effects across studies.
Thanks!

That's all that needs to be known.

End of thread.


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Caz72
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16 Dec 2014, 2:36 pm

I had a healthy birth too but I'm autistic. Not mild either.



r84shi37
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16 Dec 2014, 6:37 pm

I had a sever lung infection. I was on a cardiopulmonary bypass machine for a couple weeks. Still have a scar on my neck where they inserted some tubes for something or other. I walked on my toes until I was around six years old.


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Toy_Soldier
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17 Dec 2014, 2:06 pm

"CONCLUSIONS: There is insufficient evidence to implicate any 1 perinatal or neonatal factor in autism etiology, although there is some evidence to suggest that exposure to a broad class of conditions reflecting general compromises to perinatal and neonatal health may increase the risk. Methodological variations were likely sources of heterogeneity of risk factor effects across studies."

I did read the study and found the conclusion wording misleading. What I got out of the report was they did not find one huge smoke belching cannon, but did find 6-8 birth complications that are coupled with significantly higher autism rates... a half dozen moderate smoking guns, so to speak.

But they are unsure of cause and effect. Does a congenital autism cause more birth complications or vice versa?

They do say elsewhere in the report they estimate birth complications together are responsible for 12% of autism cases. This is a fairly large number when talking about autism causes. One of the other main causes, single gene mutations is 20%.

The report is also 3 years old and several new studies have all found connection and even added to the suspects.

The apparent multiplicity of causes and unknown interrelations continues to drive researchers mad.