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aspiesavant
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08 Feb 2015, 3:10 pm

While there is a Wikipedia article on the Autism Rights Movement, it is not referenced on the article on Asperger Syndrome, the article on Autism or the article on the Autism spectrum.

On the talk pages of those articles, I argued for an inclusion of references to the Autism Rights Movement and/or non-medical definitions of Autism. My arguments have been rejected, however, and censored by Wikipedia's editing police.

I would like to call upon other members of this community for assisting me in my effort to include the non-medical definition of Autism on articles dealing with Autism, as the notion of Autism as a disorder perpetuates negative stereotypes about Autism and consequently is harmful for many individuals with Autism.



Tesla1856
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08 Feb 2015, 3:14 pm

I don't understand, how could one describe a psychological condition in non-medical terms?



aspiesavant
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08 Feb 2015, 3:21 pm

Tesla1856 wrote:
I don't understand, how could one describe a psychological condition in non-medical terms?


Interesting scientific publication on Autism and neurodiversity :
The Cerebral Subject and the Challenge of Neurodiversity

Quote:
Abstract
The neurodiversity movement has so far been dominated by autistic people who believe their
condition is not a disease to be treated and, if possible, cured, but rather a human specificity (like
sex or race) that must be equally respected. Autistic self-advocates largely oppose groups of parents
of autistic children and professionals searching for a cure for autism. This article discusses the positions
of the pro-cure and anti-cure groups. It also addresses the emergence of autistic cultures and
various issues concerning autistic identities. It shows how identity issues are frequently linked to
a ‘neurological self-awareness’ and a rejection of psychological interpretations. It argues that
the preference for cerebral explanations cannot be reduced to an aversion to psychoanalysis
or psychological culture. Instead, such preference must be understood within the context of the diffusion
of neuroscientific claims beyond the laboratory and their penetration in different domains of
life in contemporary biomedicalized societies. Within this framework, neuroscientific theories, practices,
technologies and therapies are influencing the ways we think about ourselves and relate to
others, favoring forms of neurological or cerebral subjectivation. The article shows how neuroscientific
claims are taken up in the formation of identities, as well as social and community networks.


Interesting scientific publication on Autism and neurodiversity :
Autism as a Natural Human Variation: Reflections on the Claims of the Neurodiversity Movement

Quote:
Conclusion

Some autism inside the narrow conception of neurodiversity can be seen as a natural variation
on par with for example homosexuality. (Lower-functioning autism is also part of natural
variation but may rightly be viewed as a disability.) Just as homosexuals in a homo-phobic
society, the conditions in which autists have to live in an autism-incompatible or even autism-
phobic society are unreasonable. Therefore, it is not fair to place the locus of the problem
solely on the autistic individual. What also is needed is a discourse about the detrimental
effects of an autism-incompatible and autism-phobic society on the well-being of autists.
Therefore, in the case of high-functioning autists, society should not stigmatize these persons
as being disabled, or as having a disorder or use some other deficit-based language to refer to
these people. It is much less morally problematic to refer to the particular vulnerability of
these autists. Also, group-specific rights for autists are needed to ensure that the autistic
culture is treated with genuine equality.
It is our conclusion that it is wrong to subsume all persons with Asperger’s
Syndrome and high-functioning autists into the wide diagnostic category of Autistic Disorder
(Autism Spectrum Disorder), as the work group of the American Psychiatric Association for
the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders-V (DSM-V) proposes. Some of
these persons are not benefited with such a psychiatric defect-based diagnosis. In fact, some
of them are being harmed by it, because of the disrespect the diagnosis displays for their
natural way of being, which is of course contradictory to the Hippocratic principle of ‘primum
non nocere’. However, we think that it is still reasonable to include other categories of autism
in the psychiatric diagnostics. The narrow conception of the neurodiversity claim should be
accepted but the broader claim should not.



See also :
* Neurodiversity
* Autism rights movement



AspieUtah
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08 Feb 2015, 3:32 pm

Working with Wikipedia is a lesson in the tyranny of authority. They prize the singular focus of each article, and resist any edits which don't adhere to this focus.

You probably would be able to edit the other articles effectively by adding links to the "Autism rights movement" article within the "See also" sections of the other articles. Readers who are truly interested in the articles would very likely also be interested in the articles included in the "See also" sections. That way, your relevant edits to the "Autism rights movement" article would be immediately accessible by others reading the other articles.


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aspiesavant
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08 Feb 2015, 3:46 pm

AspieUtah wrote:
You probably would be able to edit the other articles effectively by adding links to the "Autism rights movement" article within the "See also" sections of the other articles. Readers who are truly interested in the articles would very likely also be interested in the articles included in the "See also" sections. That way, your relevant edits to the "Autism rights movement" article would be immediately accessible by others reading the other articles.


I tried that. The links were removed as well.



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08 Feb 2015, 4:58 pm

aspiesavant wrote:
I tried that. The links were removed as well.

I wish I could say that I am surprised, but, when it comes to Wikipedia.org, nothing surprises me.

Having read the edits and reversions made about your hoped-for edits, I would try to find another way (a different article(s)) in which your edits might better fit (according to the monitors).

Meanwhile, check out http://www.wikipediocracy.com/ which is home to those editors and former editors who find Wikipedia repugnant. It might better describe what you are up against. Otherwise, I am in your corner. Your edits seem reasonable and relevant.


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Jono
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09 Feb 2015, 8:07 am

aspiesavant wrote:
While there is a Wikipedia article on the Autism Rights Movement, it is not referenced on the article on Asperger Syndrome, the article on Autism or the article on the Autism spectrum.

On the talk pages of those articles, I argued for an inclusion of references to the Autism Rights Movement and/or non-medical definitions of Autism. My arguments have been rejected, however, and censored by Wikipedia's editing police.

I would like to call upon other members of this community for assisting me in my effort to include the non-medical definition of Autism on articles dealing with Autism, as the notion of Autism as a disorder perpetuates negative stereotypes about Autism and consequently is harmful for many individuals with Autism.


The Autism Rights Movement is mentioned in the last section of the Asperger Syndrome article, "Society and Culture", and includes a link to the article on it in the text. That's good enough, I think.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Asperger_syndrome#Society_and_culture



aspiesavant
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09 Feb 2015, 8:20 am

Jono wrote:
The Autism Rights Movement is mentioned in the last section of the Asperger Syndrome article, "Society and Culture", and includes a link to the article on it in the text. That's good enough, I think.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Asperger_syndrome#Society_and_culture


Considering the importance and relevance of the information today, I don't think that's nearly good enough. IMO, it should have at least it's own sub-section and/or a link should be added to the "Autism Rights movement" page in the introduction.

Also, (unless I'm mistaking) it's entirely absent on the "Autism" and "Autism spectrum" articles.



Protogenoi
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10 Feb 2015, 8:39 pm

I still have my old wikipedia account. I've done a lot of edits with it and have even gotten into an editwar over the negative energy article... which is admittedly now missing... I've been trying to bring it back. I've explained to them a hundred times why negative mass isn't the same thing as negative energy, but their warped and simplistic understanding of Relativity made me want to leave... wikipedia is anti-science. :roll:

Edit: Actually the Negative Energy has reappeared, yay! :D Although, it is a lot shorter than it used to be and a whole lot less informative.


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aspiesavant
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10 Feb 2015, 8:44 pm

Protogenoi wrote:
I still have my old wikipedia account. I've done a lot of edits with it and have even gotten into an editwar over the negative energy article... which is admittedly now missing... I've been trying to bring it back. I've explained to them a hundred times why negative mass isn't the same thing as negative energy, but their warped and simplistic understanding of Relativity made me want to leave... wikipedia is anti-science. :roll:

Edit: Actually the Negative Energy has reappeared, yay! :D Although, it is a lot shorter than it used to be and a whole lot less informative.


Maybe you can find your old article, make a new account and add some info from the old article?

It might slip through :wink: