Page 2 of 2 [ 21 posts ]  Go to page Previous  1, 2

auntblabby
Veteran
Veteran

User avatar

Joined: 12 Feb 2010
Gender: Male
Posts: 96,397
Location: the island of defective toy santas

12 Sep 2015, 2:17 am

Eurythmic wrote:
auntblabby wrote:
I read in japan that they have internet-connected toilets.


Do they post directly to Facebook so you friends know if you've just done a number 1 or a number 2?

they are meant to connect to doctor's offices, they somehow analyze the content of the "contents" therein, checking for disease, and if the computerized toilet detects ill urine or poop it tells a doctor.



ZenWistalia
Yellow-bellied Woodpecker
Yellow-bellied Woodpecker

User avatar

Joined: 13 Sep 2015
Age: 23
Posts: 60
Location: NJ, USA

13 Sep 2015, 6:57 pm

Some issues:

1. Hackers are constantly evolving, finding new ways to hack previously "unhackable" systems/software.
2. Not everything needs this level of automation. It adds more cost, and another point of failure and frustration.
3. It's mainly about marketing. If they can get something "new" out the door, they surely will do it. Even if it isn't much of a help on the customer's end (making their life better ... for how much it's worth).

-Ben



Edenthiel
Veteran
Veteran

User avatar

Joined: 12 Sep 2014
Age: 52
Gender: Female
Posts: 2,820
Location: S.F Bay Area

16 Sep 2015, 12:06 am

Reading some of the industry write ups on IoT tech, it seems a big, unspoken part of it is in fact intended to be data collection. We'll trade you the convenience of being able to turn down the thermostat from an airport...in return for knowing your personal daily patterns of activity. Just think of what can be tracked when an entire household of IoT's is analyzed in aggregate. And when you look at the products being pushed...it certainly doesn't seem like there is quite enough benefit for the consumer, IMO.

Now, if I were paranoid I'd think the NSA/Google (but I repeat myself) had a hand in the push. But really, it's not necessary as most tech corporations today already know the value of selling -or trading with 'partners'- their users' personal data.


_________________
“For small creatures such as we the vastness is bearable only through love.”
―Carl Sagan


mr_bigmouth_502
Veteran
Veteran

User avatar

Joined: 12 Dec 2013
Age: 26
Gender: Male
Posts: 6,995
Location: Alberta, Canada

16 Sep 2015, 7:16 am

I don't mind the idea of having my home devices on a local network so that I can, say, control my thermostat from my phone within my own home, but I do NOT want this network to be accessible on the Internet.



ZenWistalia
Yellow-bellied Woodpecker
Yellow-bellied Woodpecker

User avatar

Joined: 13 Sep 2015
Age: 23
Posts: 60
Location: NJ, USA

16 Sep 2015, 8:13 am

Edenthiel wrote:
Reading some of the industry write ups on IoT tech, it seems a big, unspoken part of it is in fact intended to be data collection. We'll trade you the convenience of being able to turn down the thermostat from an airport...in return for knowing your personal daily patterns of activity. Just think of what can be tracked when an entire household of IoT's is analyzed in aggregate. And when you look at the products being pushed...it certainly doesn't seem like there is quite enough benefit for the consumer, IMO.

lol, I personally don't really care if someone can tell what I'm doing by monitoring my power usage (smart meter for example) and the temperature set on my thermostat.
I don't really know why, but it just doesn't bother me.

I like the idea that the collected data can be used to make reductions in energy usage, etc...
And, I'm willing to take the risk. Hell, I'm sure the NSA is seeing everything we post on these forums here.

Now, if there is a hidden camera, that is something I can't agree on. :P

Also, I can't agree with reading thoughts, if we ever get that advanced as a civilization. XD
That's gone over the line, when it comes to privacy (for me at least).

Edenthiel wrote:
But really, it's not necessary as most tech corporations today already know the value of selling -or trading with 'partners'- their users' personal data.

Oh not that...!
I think it's just plain silly, and VERY unprofessional! :evil:

I actually intern with a small start up business that makes devices that you can put on your electric meter. You can then monitor your power usage from a computer or smartphone. It doesn't give you extremely precise measurements, but it's plenty good enough to tell when the AC is running, etc...
It allows you to easily keep track of your daily, even hourly power usage, so you can shut things off when they aren't needed, hence saving you money, and reducing pollution! :D It's like a win-win! (except when it comes to the NSA "spying" on you XD)
The company doesn't sell personal data either, it's all confidential, like it should be! :D

-Ben