"Aspies live to work - NTs live to play"

Page 1 of 3 [ 43 posts ]  Go to page 1, 2, 3  Next

Vertetuesi
Tufted Titmouse
Tufted Titmouse

User avatar

Joined: 2 Jun 2014
Gender: Male
Posts: 34

18 Mar 2015, 4:34 am

How true is this?



Norny
Veteran
Veteran

User avatar

Joined: 31 Dec 2013
Age: 25
Gender: Male
Posts: 1,487

18 Mar 2015, 4:39 am

don't know what it means but it sounds like whimsical BS


_________________
Unapologetically, Norny. :rambo:
-chronically drunk


sparrowblue
Yellow-bellied Woodpecker
Yellow-bellied Woodpecker

User avatar

Joined: 27 May 2013
Gender: Female
Posts: 69
Location: UK

18 Mar 2015, 5:22 am

I can vaguely understand where it's coming from but don't think it holds much truth, no.

It really depends what one even considers as work or play. I think those of us with AS can want to "play" just as much as NT people but what we consider play is vastly different. Someone without AS may enjoy social games which would be no fun for someone with AS. Maybe they'd say they "live for" these games. Other NT people are quite invested into their work, more so than some of those with AS. The implication that some people only live to work could be interpreted as kind of bleak, as though they are machines with no capacity for enjoyment or appreciation of life. Not true, although it's likely that enjoyment and appreciation will be found in different ways.

It's way too general a statement. How can someone who works a repetitive job they don't enjoy in order to get something else (which honestly is the first thing that comes to mind when I see "work" in the context used above), be compared to someone who has a job they find fulfilling, fascinating and gratifying (let's give the example of a scientist who lives for science - this could be a focused, passionate person with AS or they could be a focused, passionate NT) with someone who plays video games all day to pass the time but finds little enjoyment in this, to someone who works but plays video games - using video games as a definite example of play - after work and finds this the most fulfilling part of their day? There are too many differences between people on any spectrum to draw those kinds of comparisons.

From one viewpoint it makes a little sense: the viewpoint that these social games are the main kind of play and any more introverted, focused, constructive way of spending time is work. But sometimes nothing comes out of the latter. And there are plenty of introvert NTs who prefer to do something interesting but constructive than socialise constantly; likewise people with AS who might prefer things which are not so constructive, just being in the moment. Nature, music, whatever. People live to live. What the most important aspects of "living" are depends on the individual and their circumstances, regardless of where they are on or off the spectrum.



Joe90
Veteran
Veteran

User avatar

Joined: 23 Feb 2010
Gender: Female
Posts: 19,816
Location: South-East England

18 Mar 2015, 6:41 am

What the hell? I have never heard of that one before.

Nearly all the NTs I know have a better motivation to work than me. If I had to work full time, I would most probably grow really depressed from boredom, and break down. I feel so much more motivated and less anxious when I am doing stuff like housework, shopping, etc. I don't like being under strict rules you have at work. Some NTs thrive on being under the pressure of work and having a structure, but I feel like I'm more independant-minded and would rather just live out in the country somewhere in a cottage and socialise with hillbillies.


_________________
Female
Aged 31
On antidepressants
Have ASD, ADHD and anxiety disorder
Empathy score: 61 out of a possible 80. (High)


Sino
Pileated woodpecker
Pileated woodpecker

User avatar

Joined: 8 Mar 2015
Posts: 176
Location: Earth

18 Mar 2015, 7:12 am

Norny wrote:
don't know what it means but it sounds like whimsical BS

QFT.

I can focus in short bursts or whenever I'm dealing with a particularly interesting client at my tutoring job, but unless I'm really on the clock, I tend to lark about in between papers. As those above me have already noted, it really depends on how you define "work" and "play".



kraftiekortie
Veteran
Veteran

User avatar

Joined: 4 Feb 2014
Gender: Male
Posts: 75,037
Location: Queens, NYC

18 Mar 2015, 8:28 am

I really don't agree with that statement.



Protogenoi
Veteran
Veteran

User avatar

Joined: 24 Aug 2014
Gender: Female
Posts: 817

18 Mar 2015, 9:14 am

Aristotle thought play was more noble than work as he considered play to be equal to contemplation.
I myself live to play and most NT's I know are workaholics.


_________________
Now take a trip with me but don't be surprised when things aren't what they seem. I've known it from the start all these good ideas will tear your brain apart. Scared, but you can follow me. I'm too weird to live but much too rare to die. - a7x


kraftiekortie
Veteran
Veteran

User avatar

Joined: 4 Feb 2014
Gender: Male
Posts: 75,037
Location: Queens, NYC

18 Mar 2015, 9:16 am

Aristotle believed things like satire and tragedy were "play"--but a "useful" type of "play," since it made you "work" on your mind.



The_Walrus
Forum Moderator
Forum Moderator

User avatar

Joined: 27 Jan 2010
Age: 26
Gender: Male
Posts: 7,549
Location: Reading, England

18 Mar 2015, 9:34 am

Whoever said that had clearly never met me...



kraftiekortie
Veteran
Veteran

User avatar

Joined: 4 Feb 2014
Gender: Male
Posts: 75,037
Location: Queens, NYC

18 Mar 2015, 9:36 am

We have an Eggman...and a Walrus...here on this Site.

This should, in and of itself, debunk the above statement.



RetroGamer87
Veteran
Veteran

User avatar

Joined: 30 Jul 2013
Age: 33
Gender: Male
Posts: 9,653
Location: Adelaide, Australia

18 Mar 2015, 9:54 am

I used to think the opposite was true...

Joe90 wrote:
If I had to work full time, I would most probably grow really depressed from boredom, and break down.
This was me a few years ago, then I got more depressed by underemployment then work. I started to care too much about my image and grew more conformist. So I worked.

If NTs are more willing to work it could be because they're more docile (boss: will you work unpaid overtime? NT: sure!) and more willing to race to the bottom (boss: everyone is willing to work unpaid overtime so why aren't you? NT: OK then). They're more prone to conformity (conformist: I must work because everyone else does) and maybe they don't get stressed out as easily.

As for us aspies, when dealing with your colleagues takes a lot of energy, that leaves you with less energy for work. Also some of us may use extra energy to stay organised (something that comes to NTs effortlessly) and some of us may suffer sensory problems in the workplace (still wondering why they have the heating turned up to high in the winter).


_________________
The days are long, but the years are short


kraftiekortie
Veteran
Veteran

User avatar

Joined: 4 Feb 2014
Gender: Male
Posts: 75,037
Location: Queens, NYC

18 Mar 2015, 9:56 am

As far as "organizational ability" is concerned, you'll find lots of NT's who are as disorganized as an "executive-function-challenged" Aspie.



LupaLuna
Veteran
Veteran

User avatar

Joined: 14 Jan 2013
Age: 50
Gender: Male
Posts: 1,551
Location: tri-cities WA

18 Mar 2015, 10:02 am

I think what the OP is comparing this to is, is the fact that we don't play like NT's do, like going to bars, sporting events, etc. and in most "narrow interested" jobs. AS people do work longer and harder then most NT's would. but we would not work so hard and lose focus if the job got boring and monotonous.



kraftiekortie
Veteran
Veteran

User avatar

Joined: 4 Feb 2014
Gender: Male
Posts: 75,037
Location: Queens, NYC

18 Mar 2015, 10:05 am

Many NT's don't go to "bars" and "sporting events," either.

I'm a person on the Spectrum. If I could afford it, I would certainly attend sporting events. I don't drink alcohol--but I enjoy "sports bar" type places which have trivia contests.



Kiriae
Veteran
Veteran

User avatar

Joined: 30 Mar 2014
Age: 32
Gender: Female
Posts: 2,349
Location: Kraków, Poland

18 Mar 2015, 10:08 am

Isn't it the other way around?



downbutnotout
Veteran
Veteran

User avatar

Joined: 6 Jul 2014
Gender: Female
Posts: 656
Location: MN, US

18 Mar 2015, 11:25 am

Sounds like arbitrary divisions for the sake of having clearer "groups" for everyone to be in.

There's a term for people who are obsessed with work to the detriment of other aspects of life: workaholic. I don't think it's just people not recognizing Aspies, and it's not always something that could be considered a special interest like programming.

For me, my work is my play. I love to write, and I love to tinker with things.