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C2V
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16 Apr 2015, 11:03 am

This is half rant, half question.
After another disastrous work trial, someone told me I just have to find a job that suits me. I've read the general information around about what work choices might be better for autistics, but its all general. It seems to me that there isn't any job I can do that others can't do better and I really don't understand. I'm not unintelligent. With studies, I do fine. But when it comes to working a job things always fall apart. Every time. And it seems to be so easy for everyone else - they start questioning what's wrong with me that I can't do what they can, which makes it worse. In general jobs I'm slower, don't pick things up or remember properly, feel generally aversive toward my workmates end up making stupid mistakes and feel stressed, rushed, trapped. It occurred to me maybe blue-collar jobs are the problem, where there tends to be an emphasis on speed rather than quality, and thus a specialty might be required - work smart, not hard. Something worth more than minimal wage thus not requiring insane hours.
What is it about working and jobs that autistics find so difficult? Is there some method in order to get around this? What's the problem? I suppose I'm frustrated and wondering what others have experienced.


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alex
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16 Apr 2015, 11:06 am

I think it's the social element that most of us have issues with. We need to have things explained clearly because we take things literally which can cause problems if our boss leaves a step out or doesn't fully explain everything. The best thing I can suggest is to work on your social skills but keep in mind that it will be a long gradual process of improvement so don't get discouraged.


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MollyTroubletail
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16 Apr 2015, 11:09 am

Blue collar jobs are pretty much hell on everyone even NT's, but there can't be anything worse for Aspies. You will most likely need to learn a technical skill in which you will work mainly by yourself instead of in social work groups. In this way your intelligence can be your leading quality, instead of your underdeveloped social skills or speed of movement.

A technical skill does not imply that you need to work in the technology sector. For example, x-ray and ultrasound technicians in hospitals work almost completely alone also.



SocOfAutism
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17 Apr 2015, 10:21 am

I'm sure you have talents or traits that make some things easy for you that aren't easy for other people. The trick is finding a job that requires what you CAN do, not what's hard for you.

Autistic people have been shown have superior skills over typically developed people in parallel perception (paying attention to more than one thing at a time), focus, and error finding (noticing a thing among many other things that is out of place).



BTDT
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17 Apr 2015, 10:30 am

With most blue collar jobs, you don't have time to be perfect.
More importantly, you don't want to do such a good job that it raises the bar for everyone else.
You need to accept that you can only do an OK job and move on.

But, if you need to be perfect--how about working for the rich? If you have a strong back someone may take you on and teach you how to do yardwork for an estate. The rich may not mind your slower pace of work if you do a perfect job.

http://forums.gardenweb.com/discussions ... e-gardener