Page 2 of 2 [ 18 posts ]  Go to page Previous  1, 2

Rocket123
Veteran
Veteran

User avatar

Joined: 15 Dec 2012
Age: 56
Gender: Male
Posts: 2,229
Location: Lost in Space

23 May 2015, 4:03 pm

Aniihya wrote:
Rocket: That wasn't a very good comparison. If the guy was refusing to mow the lawn then you could compare it to your colleague not working. A more fitting example would be, your colleague got the job to write a protocol and makes it very brief and leave out about 25% of crucial content. That would be a more adequate comparison since it attributes to sloppiness and it is something that somebody doesn't really do regularly.

I definitely did not do a good job describing the situation. The person I was referring to would eventually do the work, but do it half-heartedly and in an incomplete manner.

When something is done in an incomplete manner, it can be attributed to several factors:
1) The person lacks the skills to do the job
2) The person is not adequately trained to do the job (and this includes being provided instructions on what is expected of a “job well done”)
3) The person is not motivated to do the job properly

I believe in both cases, the problem is one of motivation. And, this is where I come back to values. As in both situations, individuals are exchanging their time for compensation. And, in this scenario, I believe you are obligated to do your best job. I know, for me, I feel morally obligated to do so.

As a note, the solution I proposed may or may not work. Nevertheless, it’s good to experiment when one thing is clearly not working. In the software world, we use “inspect and adapt” feedback loops, to constantly evaluate what is and is not working and make adjustments in order to improve things. I would suggest the same approach, in this scenario.



cavernio
Veteran
Veteran

User avatar

Joined: 6 Aug 2012
Age: 36
Gender: Female
Posts: 1,469

23 May 2015, 4:48 pm

If one doesn't care enough to notice if its good or bad enough, one will do a bad job of that task.

Also, mowed lawns are f*****g ridiculous and good riddance to the noise, smell, pollution, cost, and effort of keeping a lawn nice.


_________________
Not autistic, I think
Prone to depression
Have celiac disease
Poor motivation


Rocket123
Veteran
Veteran

User avatar

Joined: 15 Dec 2012
Age: 56
Gender: Male
Posts: 2,229
Location: Lost in Space

23 May 2015, 7:17 pm

cavernio wrote:
If one doesn't care enough to notice if its good or bad enough, one will do a bad job of that task.

If one doesn't care enough to notice, then that person should not expect to get paid for the work performed. And, I believe that is key point here. The OP didn’t just want to give his son money. He wanted his son to earn the money.

IMO, this entire discussion has nothing to do with being an Aspie. Rather, it’s a values thing. And values are ideally ingrained within children at a very young age.