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redrobin62
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22 Jul 2015, 3:29 pm

I, too, have noise sensitivity issues. Just sitting in the lobby or dining room of this building makes me shudder. The sounds of people talking, elevator motor, dishes clanking, people walking, traffic going by outside, the front door's bell ringing, the elevator door opening & closing, the whirring of the copies...all of it seeps into my head at once and it feels like my head's gonna explode. Consequently, I prefer eating in my room.

Same as if I'm driving. If no one's in the car with me then I'm okay. Once I have passengers, and they start talking, there's a good chance I good put the car into a tree. Very risky. It happened today. My passengers tried to get me to drive back to this place using a circuitous route I'm unfamiliar with. I told them I have a preference for the straight route but they kept insisting I take the circuitous route. Naturally, I blew up. They were surprised when I did. I explained how I try to see the world in patterns, in straight simple lines, and veering off my intended path puts them at risk because I could make mistakes. Hopefully they'll believe me now when I say I'm sensitive to noise.



marcb0t
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22 Jul 2015, 6:55 pm

Armeria wrote:
Hi, thanks for the answers, yeah I do already use big headphones for watching tv or music listening...it does help but I can still feel noise through them a bit and just have to choose to ignore it and concentrate on what i'm watching/listening to...are there any mediations that help or things like that?xx
(i will get some ear defenders - that's a good idea)

Hello
Go to your local Home Depot and ask about how to noise insulate your home. There are materials out there for sealing gaps between windows, doors and such.

Also, maybe a cheaper compromise, look into buying an audio recording booth. The insulation foam is designed to minimize outside acoustic disturbance. Could use it as a little solitude when things get to intense.

Not meant to be a silly idea. You can also purchase the acoustic blocking foam separately and line your bedroom walls with it. But that might be a little more costly.

That's the best I can come up with. Hope it helps. :?


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marcb0t
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22 Jul 2015, 7:02 pm

Oh, also look into double pane windows. The gap of air in between is good for weakening the intensity of the sound waves.

I work at a warehouse, and even with ear plugs in, I can still feel the forklifts and pallet slamming in my body. Quite annoying, but it takes the edge off. I feel your pain, though.


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Deb1970
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22 Jul 2015, 10:08 pm

I agree about the giant fan. Since it is Summer I also have a window air conditioner. I have suffered for several years from my neighbors wind chimes. I can't sleep due to the loud noise they make but since I added the fan and air conditioner I now enjoy a more peaceful sleep.


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nerdygirl
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24 Jul 2015, 6:35 am

Armeria wrote:
I do appreciate the answers. From people who can relate and have advice i can use. I don't have allergies ..anyway, this is the last place i expect to be jumped on for not being oh so understanding of everyone's feelings. WTF? I wish there was a way you could block people on here...


Who do you want to block? Me? After 9 posts here you've decided I'm a bad person?

And why would you assume that I do not relate? And how can anyone know what advice you can use? Only *you* can sift through the advice given and figure out what will work best in your specific situation.

Anyway, I used the allergies as an example of how people need to make major, often inconvenient, changes to their lifestyle in order to deal with the problems they have. ASD is real, and the problems are real, and just as severe and often more. So, like a physical problem often needs major changes, dealing with ASD problems do as well.

I *do* understand noise sensitivity. But, I've adjusted my whole life so that I could live in the country and limit the extraneous noises I don't like. I know that advice won't do you any good.

I assumed you tried headphones. Other people here have mentioned about air conditioners and fans and other things that create white noise as well. Are you going to call them all silly? Do you own or rent? If you rent, the idea of putting in double-paned windows is ridiculous. Are you going to call out that poster?

Life involves the economics of choice. Whatever options we choose require risk. We risk losing some of what we like in order to gain another thing we want.

No matter what method you choose of limiting the noise from the outside, you are going to have to give up some of your comfort. For me, headphones and earplugs bother me because of touch sensitivity. I'd rather have the noise than having something on my body. The curtains...so they block the light and you can't see outside. They would help (and even someone else on here talked about muffling, which the curtains would do.) But perhaps you would rather put up with the noise than lose the light and seeing outside during the day.

No one but you will know the *best* option for you. All we can do is pass along ideas. So, when you ask for advice don't call answers "silly" and don't assume that the responders don't understand. If I didn't understand *anything* about noise sensitivity, I wouldn't have responded at all.



kraftiekortie
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24 Jul 2015, 8:39 am

I think she meant me, actually.



ToughDiamond
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24 Jul 2015, 11:17 pm

Double glazing of the right type can provide some sound insulation, though the results of any attempt to really cut down the noise that gets into a given room can be unpredictable, I've been told.

I've had a lot of success with pink / brown noise played through big speakers. If a room is reasonably well sound insulated, it's usually the bass end of the sound spectrum that's the culprit for any remaining problem - the lower the frequency, the more it penetrates. So your speakers need to be able to produce a loud enough sound output at the lowest frequency that's bothering you. In my case it's these people with bassy car music systems, so ideally I need a deep bass speaker, though I get away with 2 large-ish hi-fi speakers. Personally I don't much mind turning them up quite loud, as the constant, smooth pink noise doesn't distract me, but some people might find it annoying, so experiment before committing to a lot of work and expense if you can.

I can sympathise with the general problem. I've pretty much fixed the trouble from stompy music and footballs, but I seem to be getting more sensitive to people who have even slightly raucous voices, so I have to restrict the time I spend with anybody who isn't fairly soft-spoken, as well as limiting my social intake to people of suitable character. It's rather regrettable, but I guess it can't be helped.



BirdInFlight
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25 Jul 2015, 5:44 am

I have sensitivity to noise, but for reasons of economic issues I live right over a main traffic street. We can't all obtain exactly the conditions that would be ideal for us, even when we try in life, so what one has to do is make the best of what you've got when you can't just have the best itself.

So for reasons of the noisy street outside, I keep my windows closed but run an electric fan in the summer. If you aim it directly at you steadily, instead of using the oscillation setting, it really does help to cool your body down. I live in underwear or light "at home" clothes in the summer. Cool showers and staying clean also help to cool me down, as a buildup of sweat makes you feel more uncomfortable anyway, and clean skin "feels" cooler when that fan hits it.

The fan's white noise also works magic at covering up the street noise, although high peaks of sound such as a raucous motorcycle or huge city bus still get through at times.

Having the TV, radio or music on also helps mask and distract from noise.

I have those ordinary foam earplugs, and those really help muffle the sound although they don't kill it completely and you can still hear things, just muffled.

There's nothing wrong in having to close up windows if that's what it's going to take to live more comfortably regarding intrusive noise from outside. As has been said, if allergy sufferers are prepared to live that way as it works better for their needs, a person with noise sensitivity may want to make that lifestyle choice too.

People with air conditioning have to ALWAYS have all windows closed because it doesn't work properly any other way!

Also agree with asking the hardware store about insulating strips to put along the window seals; I've had to add some to mine.


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25 Jul 2015, 7:40 am

I use noise canceling headphones on a daily basis. The headphones can be expensive, but it's worth it. The lack of sensory input really helps me to focus.


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nick007
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25 Jul 2015, 10:09 pm

If you don't have air-conditioning, you could look into getting an AC window unit. It will provide background noise in addition to cooling you off.


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DailyPoutine1
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25 Jul 2015, 10:13 pm

The noise of my chair crackling when I move, hearing my own breath when theres no other sounds, dropping an ustensil in the sink, all of these sound extremely agressive and painful to me.