Aerosmith Protests Over Trump Campaign Using Their Music

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AnonymousAnonymous
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12 Oct 2015, 6:18 pm

http://www.bbc.com/news/entertainment-arts-34504013


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13 Oct 2015, 12:44 am

Does Aerosmith own the rights to Dream On? People outside the US are frequently unaware that singers in the US have to sign over the rights to every song they write and/or sing to their music "label", the company that distributes the song. After the song's popularity has waned, record companies will sell the songs to another company.

Years later, whoever owns a song will license its use to a corporation to use in advertising a product. This has led to some embarrassing situations. A while back the owner of the Elvis hit song Viva Las Vegas allowed Pfizer Pharmaceuticals to use the song to advertise Viagra. So there were actors singing "Viva Viagra" on TV commercials. Elvis's heirs had no recourse, since they didn't own the song. Fan outrage led to Pfizer greatly scaling back use of the song.

And then there was the plan to use Johnny Cash's song Ring Of Fire to advertise a hemorrhoid cream. That plan was dropped after thousands of fans signed boycott petitions. GM used John Cougar Mellencamp's Our Country to advertise Chevy pickups, ignoring Mellencamp's disapproval, but he didn't own the song. So, if Aerosmith doesn't own Dream On, there's little they can do.



izzeme
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13 Oct 2015, 2:26 am

There is still the creative liscence, even though the label 'might' own the song, the artist should be consulted before using a song in certain situations.

Simply playing a song on the radio doesn't matter, but using it for commercials, movies or games does require the artists' approval (or, at least, offer the artist the right to refuse usage, permission is implied unless revoked), and presidential ad campaigns fall under that banner.



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14 Oct 2015, 10:30 am

pezar wrote:
And then there was the plan to use Johnny Cash's song Ring Of Fire to advertise a hemorrhoid cream.

:lol:
By the Mexican style of the trumpet music in that song I would have thought it was about having eating particularly spicy mexican cuisine then suffering the fiery consequences the next day when it came out the other end.


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14 Oct 2015, 11:56 am

pezar wrote:
Does Aerosmith own the rights to Dream On? People outside the US are frequently unaware that singers in the US have to sign over the rights to every song they write and/or sing to their music "label", the company that distributes the song. After the song's popularity has waned, record companies will sell the songs to another company.

I'm not so sure that's true. A record company (label) might own an arrangement (in this case, "Dream On", by Aerosmith), but they don't often own the WORDS, to a song. Writers KEEP that property, to make money for THEMSELVES----there are MILLIONS of song writers, who write songs, but never sing them; conversely, there are singers who don't write their songs.

It might even be THREE different properties: Arrangement, artist, words----and, maybe a FOURTH: music! (Sometimes, whomever writes the words, will also write the music, so they only get ONE fee, maybe.) A whole lotta people get paid, for just ONE record----that's why, on the Grammys, there's the category "Best Song" (words), and "Best Record" (arrangement).

I've heard Dolly Parton say, many times, that after writing / singing "I Will Always Love You", many people sang the song----she said that Whitney Houston sang it, the decade after Dolly wrote / sang it, and Dolly was hoping that someone would make it a hit, the NEXT decade, as well, cuz every time they did, it fattened her bank account. So, Dolly's arrangement might be owned by somebody else, and therefore, someone would have to pay whomever owns that RECORD----but, rest-assured, NOBODY BUT DOLLY owns those words, and she is a shrewd, intelligent, extremely successful business woman.

Kelly Pickler, for instance, though she's not NEAR the bankable star, that Dolly is, owns her own publishing company, as well, cuz she writes all of her stuff.

Another perfect example is "Happy Birthday" going to Public Domain, recently----a MILLION-and-one people have sung that song, and every time they did, they had to pay the WRITER (or, whomever owned the words----in this case, the person's estate, I think).

Some years ago, some company (can't remember which one) digitized a song of Dolly's (IIRC, it was "9 to 5"), and put it in a commercial----it was pulled immediately----I would bet, almost anything, that they hadn't payed for the rights, cuz they figured no one would make-out what song it was, cuz it was digitized (I knew what it was, IMMEDIATELY, and someone must've, also)!


Years later, whoever owns a song will license its use to a corporation to use in advertising a product. This has led to some embarrassing situations. A while back the owner of the Elvis hit song Viva Las Vegas allowed Pfizer Pharmaceuticals to use the song to advertise Viagra. So there were actors singing "Viva Viagra" on TV commercials. Elvis's heirs had no recourse, since they didn't own the song. Fan outrage led to Pfizer greatly scaling back use of the song.

Again, the arrangement (artist), and the WORDS, are different things / different properties. Pfizer had to pay the WRITER, for the use of that song----they had other people SING it. If they had wanted to use the arrangement (meaning, Elvis), they would've had to pay whomever owns it (the record). (Lisa Marie said she sold ALOT of those rights----that's why people are able to use more of his stuff, now [she said she would NEVER sell Graceland, though]). In-any-case, IIRC, Elvis didn't write that song.


In regard to the OP: Donald Trump has an ARMY of lawyers, so you can BET he payed for the rights, for that record----and, if Aerosmith doesn't like it, they can cry a RIVER, and it won't matter!




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16 Oct 2015, 12:08 am

Trump will stop using it, he found a better song to use anyway.
http://www.billboard.com/articles/colum ... rump-essay



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18 Oct 2015, 5:09 am

He did the same with Neil Young and Rockin' in the Free World. And, as far as I know, Neil Young owns the rights to his own music. And he certainly didin't agree to let Donal Trump use it. So unless I'm wrong about Neil Young owning the rights, he cleraly broke the law.


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19 Oct 2015, 9:25 am

morslilleole wrote:
He did the same with Neil Young and Rockin' in the Free World. And, as far as I know, Neil Young owns the rights to his own music. And he certainly didin't agree to let Donal Trump use it. So unless I'm wrong about Neil Young owning the rights, he cleraly broke the law.

I'm not so sure about that----one may NOT have to get permission, as long as they PAY for the use. For instance, many-a-time, I've heard someone on a talk show cut-off someone who started singing "Happy Birthday" (before it was in "Public Domain"), and tell them "No-no, if you sing that, we'll have to pay for it". If they HAD'VE gone ahead and sung it, they wouldn't have been seeking permission, FIRST.

There's also "special circumstances" (I can't think of what it's called), whereas someone can PARODY a song / words (even words of a speech, poem, whatever), without permission / payment----that's how SNL gets-away with the stuff that THEY do!





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11 Aug 2016, 3:56 am

He steals others' creations willy-nilly, and only songs that seem old-fashioned it seems... the old-fashioned in the music industry couldn't care less for fascists, of course.



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11 Aug 2016, 1:57 pm

The lead singer of Twisted Sister in an interview recalled how he had called Trump and told him to stop using We're Not Gonna Take It.


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