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JohnConnor
Deinonychus
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29 Nov 2015, 4:28 pm

The reason why I am posting this is to teach others so that the information that I am obtaining from this book. If I teach others the information will stay in my head much better.


Here is one reason why those of us with AS have a much more difficult time executing the duties required of a job position.


Most neurotypic employers assume that all of their employees will be able to size up situations quickly and accurately......This is not the case, obviously.


For those of us on the spectrum we often fail to see the gestalt or big picture. I'll give you an example:


When I first started at my grocery store job I was a janitor then I got promoted to a dry goods stocking clerk. Now the problem for me started when I was not putting the product up on the shelf fast enough. The only thing that I was doing was just plodding along putting product on the shelf. It did not occur to me that (A) I only had x amount of time to put y amount of groceries on the store shelves (B) There were going to be other situations where my coworker and I were going to be needed.

Luckily I had someone come off of night crew to show me how to put the product on the shelf quickly and accurately. The store had 11 aisles. Typically you wanted to get everything that was unloaded from the delivery truck the night before from the sales floor to the aisles in about 7 hours and 30 minutes. Minus break times and other situations where we might have been needed.

I also was taught a way to put product on the shelf much more quickly by grabbing more than one individual product at a time and putting it on the shelf.



I'll give you a more recent example: I am going to start a new volunteering position at a VA Hospital. I asked for a sheet describing the major duties involved with the position in which I will be working. Here is a list of the major duties:

Complete 2-Day Matter of Balance Leader Training
Co-lead at least 2 Matter of Balance classes per year
Call Veteran Participants to support participation
Assist with set-up of and clean-up for Matter of Balance classes
Assist with promotion of all wellness programs
Call Patients to inform/remind them of outreach programs for health promotion, as available/interested
Complete sign-in sheet and all data forms and turn them in to Dr. ------- within 1 week of workshop completion



Now I sent that list of duties of to my Disability Services Coordinator at the University of Cincinnati. He then sent me the following response.

"I think you can do all of these if you plan how you are going to do each task. The more you know about what the expectations are the more you are able to prepare and then do well on the tasks."


To which I replied:

"I remember sitting down with Dr. ---- and discussing the expectations but I don't quite remember exactly what they are. However they have left me. How would you suggest I go about figuring out what those expectations are?"


To which he replied:

"You could ask if the expectations could be written out so you can better meet the needs of the department, you did not want to trust your memory and miss something important."



So the basic thing is:

Within any job description there are going to be various duties that you have to perform. The trouble that you will have is not knowing what those expectations are.


So a good way to figure out if you can perform well in either a job or volunteer position is to read the job description, know the tasks and duties associated with the job position and ask in e-mail for a clear understanding of the expectations. However whether it be through e-mail or verbal communication you must also communicate that you: (A) are committed to good performance (B) want to be a team player.



Tomorrow I am going to post about Theory of Mind.



SciFiCoyote
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29 Nov 2015, 4:41 pm

This works quite well until you work in a company where "committed to good performance" and "want to be a team player" actually have very little with the work itself, and more to do with playing politics, going along with social conformity norms, avoiding the mean girls/boys, etc. I've worked at companies where "good performance" meant you kissed your boss' b*tt and played up to your coworkers, even while they were destroying the company with bad performance. And where "being a good team player" actually meant "I won't tell on you if you don't tell on me".


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JohnConnor
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29 Nov 2015, 4:44 pm

You are correct. I have seen that before as well. Like I said I am just teaching others/teaching myself from a guide book. As we both know situations very rarely go according to a guidebook exactly.



JohnConnor
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29 Nov 2015, 4:47 pm

What you typed about I will cover later.