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InsomniaGrl
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26 Dec 2015, 8:29 am

C2V wrote:
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I have read several times the best predictor of success in therapy isn't the actual type of therapy being used but the overall connection between therapist and client.

This is what concerns me. I don't do "connection" with other people. It's something I have never experienced - with my parents, 'friends,' girlfriends, anyone. If successful therapy is contingent on personal emotional connection, I have doubts that I'm even capable.


Well its possible that the connection you could form might be one of a kind of non connection. You don't have to be all matey with a therapist, but you might have an interesting exchange of ideas that could be useful to you in some way.


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kraftiekortie
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26 Dec 2015, 8:41 am

To me, it's always good when there's a rapport between therapist and client.

However, too much of a personal connection (also known as "transference") could be bad. Like I said, I've known people who won't do boo if the therapist tells them not to do boo.

Then there's the problem of crushes on therapists. That happens too often. It might happen to me if I ever get a female therapist (which has never happened). That's "transference," too.

To me, the prognosis is most promising if the client really wants to get better, and doesn't think that getting better is somehow "selling out."



InsomniaGrl
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26 Dec 2015, 8:48 am

Just to add, i have an older sibling who is a therapist. Obviously she has studied, and learnt some things. The things you learn could just as easily be learnt from studying psychology and philosophy. I include philosophy as after all that is just the study of thought. While my sibling i am sure has been useful to some people, and been a good anchor for them in storms (sorry for the metaphor) I feel she would not be useful to me. Therapy/psychology and philosophy is way more hit and miss than a lot of people would like to make out. Good result can come from a good connection between people often because talking and being open with someone can be cathartic and sometimes accidentally useful. More accidents of use are likely to happen if the relationship with the therapist has good interpersonal vibes.
I think luck has a lot to do with things, and the personality of the therapist. There is no road map for the human mind, things actually don't all make sense, and people who do not function so well comparatively to others, are not always simply lacking insight and information which a therapist or 'knowledgeable' person can bring them.
Opinions of psychology differ greatly between schools of thought, and when human beings are studied what is often found is conjecture and confusion. Animals do not have to worry too much about what they are thinking, they just pretty much get on with it. We have self reflection, or 'conciousness' if you want to call it that, that's where things get tricky, as the concious brain can not properly perceive the concious brain, it can not adequately provide assistance for it. Existential angst, the problem of human existence, is often the root of peoples problems, for this in many ways a therapist is no more likely to be able to help you than the person who serves you your groceries.


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