High functioning autism and Adapative functioning

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StarTrekker
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26 Feb 2016, 3:27 am

I'm afraid I don't get the joke SpiderPig, can you explain?


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LaetiBlabla
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26 Feb 2016, 5:40 am

ZombieBrideXD wrote:
JakeASD wrote:
I have a low IQ and my adaptive skills are terrible, too. Thus, there isn't a discrepancy for me, personally.

I am convinced that I am intellectually handicapped but both my psychiatrist and case manager disagree. :(



Same, i preformed very poorly on specific areas of my I.Q, Verbal, Working Memory, and Information Processing speed was all either below average or in low average but my Visual And Spatial is top notch.

I also have problems preforming tasks with multiple steps in sequence.

I cant count how many times i mess up making Kraft Dinner.


i used to be like this as well. Only getting ready to go to school was extremely difficult.
My parents have helped me a lot by writing lists. Now i have lists for everything!
1 get up
2 take off your pyjama
3 go to the bathroom
4 (...)

It may look stupid, but it is not, it is helpful, efficient and you are much more relaxed and confident. You are no more worried about "will i make it on time?".

Just sit and write a chronological list.

What is still difficult for me is that i can not plan long-term objectives. Because there is so much unknown that it seems to me impossible to plan.



ScaryAspie92
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27 Feb 2016, 11:14 pm

This very interesting to here your guys experiences, thanks for your replies


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OnTheGrind
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04 May 2016, 5:46 pm

I know I'm late to the scene, but I was just recently diagnosed and joined. I was DX'd with HFA.

I also have a high I.Q., but can't seem to hold a job. Ironically, I made it through the Army fine with little problem. I believe due to the structure. Same uniform, time, places. Each day was very repetitive and structured, I knew what was going on and when. I got injured and had to get out, and since then my life has just gone down hill. I am 30, and can't hold a job. I just hate leaving the house, honestly.

But, at least now I have a starting place with this diagnoses.



JoeNavy
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10 May 2017, 1:50 pm

zkydz wrote:
LaetiBlabla wrote:
I think Autism is disabling, high IQ is also disabling.
OK...High IQ is disabling? How can that be?

As for the adaptive skills, I really suck at that. And the ability to adapt to changing circumstances are getting worse. Here is a litany of things I heard growing up:
"You ain't got a lick of sense."
"If you're head weren't screwed on, you'd lose it."
"What makes you think that's ok?" (What ever that may have been at any given time up to this very day)
"You got book learnin' but no common sense."
"Do you ever stop and think?"
"Stop being silly!"

I'm sure there were many more.


I had a personal favorite as my Grandfather always said, "Boy, you are slower than fog off s**t on a frosty morning!"
Granddaddy had a real way with words. :lol:


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JoeNavy
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10 May 2017, 7:25 pm

Yigeren wrote:
BeaArthur wrote:
I'm not sure that executive function wasn't taught. My two Aspergers kids didn't bother to learn study skills because they could waltz through school barely cracking a book. But in college, you can't do that as easily, and their performance suffered.

Study skills include organization, planning (for a project, say), staying on task, following a structure, meeting the requirements of a task. I would say there's a lot of executive function there being taught - if the student agrees to learn it.


No one taught me study skills. I went to crappy schools and I don't recall being taught by my parents. I never had to study until college. Unfortunately, once homework began to count towards the grade in late elementary school, I went from straight A's to D's and F's because I couldn't remember to and/or couldn't make myself do the homework.

I began to have trouble keeping track of all the assignments and different classes in middle school. I did well on all the tests, but that wasn't enough. Eventually I dropped out of high school, but it was for different reasons.

I had to teach myself study skills at college. I didn't do a very good job. I couldn't ever take more than 2 classes at a time, because I couldn't keep track of everything, became stressed, would develop terrible anxiety and eventually shut down and withdraw from the class.

Now I'm asking my therapist to help me teach myself study skills and other ways to adapt so that I can do more at once.


Oh. I so understand this! I was considered a nerd in a junior high school where the mere appellation could get you beat up. I was also the "classic underachiever". Because I couldn't force myself to do my homework, I barely graduated high school even though I was "gifted". I began to understand the importance of studying when I was in Nuclear Field "A" School in Orlando,FL. The sheer volume of the material and speed I was required to perform at pushed me to my limits and actually caused a couple of mental/psychological breaks. It was also the first time anyone suspected that I might have something truly different going on as I was diagnosed with a personality disorder (unspecified) shortly thereafter. This was before the DSM IV came out or I might have lost my career back then. When I finally got around to college I completed my Bachelor of Science Magna Cum Laude, primarily because of the organizational skills I learned in the service.


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Your neurodiverse (Aspie) score: 153 of 200
Your neurotypical (non-autistic) score: 60 of 200
You are very likely neurodiverse (Aspie)