Are men with aspergers effeminate and women tomboys?

Page 3 of 3 [ 41 posts ]  Go to page Previous  1, 2, 3

EclecticWarrior
Veteran
Veteran

User avatar

Joined: 28 Nov 2016
Gender: Female
Posts: 2,001
Location: Cool places

30 Nov 2016, 1:51 pm

I am biologically female but have never felt female, more masculine/genderless, this manifesting in my mannerisms and interests. This is why I consider myself nonbinary and have done so for many years pretty much since discovering that nonbinary wasn't just a thing confined to my mind only.


_________________
~Zinc Alloy aka. Russell~

WP's most sparkling member.

DX classic autism 1995, AS 2003, depression 2008

~INFP~


CockneyRebel
Veteran
Veteran

User avatar

Joined: 17 Jul 2004
Age: 45
Gender: Male
Posts: 102,076
Location: Hanging out with my fellow Sweet Peas at Stalag 13

30 Nov 2016, 7:27 pm

I strongly identify as male, though I was born otherwise. I have masculine interests and I'd die to have a body full of muscle. I also don't like being called female prefixes. I got very sick of being called those prefixes, so I bought myself something that I've always wanted. A German "Schultz" helmet. People stopped calling me feminine things, and they no longer tell Dean that his little wifey is following him. I wish that I would have bought the helmet 7 years ago. It would have made a big difference in the way that people saw me back than.


_________________
Schultz

Kanye West 2020

viewtopic.php?f=11&t=26&start=645


EclecticWarrior
Veteran
Veteran

User avatar

Joined: 28 Nov 2016
Gender: Female
Posts: 2,001
Location: Cool places

30 Nov 2016, 7:50 pm

CockneyRebel wrote:
I strongly identify as male, though I was born otherwise. I have masculine interests and I'd die to have a body full of muscle. I also don't like being called female prefixes. I got very sick of being called those prefixes, so I bought myself something that I've always wanted. A German "Schultz" helmet. People stopped calling me feminine things, and they no longer tell Dean that his little wifey is following him. I wish that I would have bought the helmet 7 years ago. It would have made a big difference in the way that people saw me back than.


I too don't like being seen as exclusively female, but my main problem is I have two large feminine features which I detest and want OFF. I try to disguise them by layering and I'd love a binder but

1. my mother would probably kill me if I got one, and;
2. I've heard they can cause some undesirable side effects.


_________________
~Zinc Alloy aka. Russell~

WP's most sparkling member.

DX classic autism 1995, AS 2003, depression 2008

~INFP~


ninagrrl
Butterfly
Butterfly

Joined: 15 Dec 2016
Age: 37
Gender: Female
Posts: 9
Location: Maine

16 Dec 2016, 1:38 pm

I don't have an official diagnosis of Aspergers, however it runs in my family and after 7 years with my Aspie son, I don't think there is a link here. My son would fit the stereotype of effeminate and plays with dolls, likes pink and purple, rainbows, hearts and wants to wear makeup and play dress up. He has even asked why he can't grow up to be a woman instead of a man. My Aspie brother is neither ultra masculine or mildly feminine. He's just.... him. As far as I go, I dressed tomboy is when I was growing up but more because of a dysmorphic view of my body so I wore baggy jeans and tshirts. In reality I'm an extreme girly girl I'm just not high maintenance... I'm more natural, no makeup, bear foot.. but I would wear dresses 24/7 if I could and I'm obsessed with jewelry and shoes (with sensory issues of having shoes on my feet that cover my toes... I just make myself uncomfortable to be cute). I also love to crochet and dance and my favorite color is purple. I'm also the female in my relationships and it's my NT girlfriend who is boyish.



pensieve
Veteran
Veteran

User avatar

Joined: 18 Nov 2008
Age: 34
Gender: Female
Posts: 8,204
Location: Sydney, Australia

03 Jan 2017, 7:20 am

You can't really apply an 'all' label to people with autism. We're each very different. Yes, I'm very masculine for a female but I've met female aspies who are not.


_________________
My band photography blog - http://lostthroughthelens.wordpress.com/
My personal blog - http://helptheywantmetosocialise.wordpress.com/


purpletoupee
Yellow-bellied Woodpecker
Yellow-bellied Woodpecker

Joined: 19 Dec 2016
Age: 30
Gender: Female
Posts: 57
Location: Ipswich

07 Jan 2017, 6:23 pm

As an individual I think people would describe me as very feminine, physically. I've always been a bit annoyed by the nonsensical restrictions on what I apparently should and shouldn't like based on gender. I don't know if it's frustrated me much more than it has the average woman though, and I was very girly in a lot of ways when I was younger. I'm too scatterbrained and casual to have a kind of slick, stylish look though and you'll never get me browsing clothes shops or spending ages putting make up on.



purpletoupee
Yellow-bellied Woodpecker
Yellow-bellied Woodpecker

Joined: 19 Dec 2016
Age: 30
Gender: Female
Posts: 57
Location: Ipswich

07 Jan 2017, 6:33 pm

I only knew of one other person with autism in real life -- he didn't present himself in a feminine way but he definitely wasn't a macho kind of person. Actually, no, I was vaguely acquainted with one other aspie guy. They were both sort of in the middle... into art, music, radio presenting, writing etc.



Holy Roman Emperor
Tufted Titmouse
Tufted Titmouse

Joined: 12 Jan 2017
Age: 22
Gender: Male
Posts: 25
Location: San Diego CA

13 Jan 2017, 2:10 am

Some people find my appearance feminine, as well as my gestures, and others, I think, do not. I have been told that some find my speech feminine, in that my voice is not loud. I am not a dominant, aggressive person, yet I have a great deal of staying power. My difficulty is acceptance in the LGBT community, as the traits of aggression and dominance seem to be what is most desirable there. I do not especially desire to be a "dues paying-card carrying member" of LGBT, but I would like to meet and become friends with other gays, especially in my general age group, and being with LGBT seems the only way to make friends (and more) with my own kind. Any ideas?



green0star
Veteran
Veteran

User avatar

Joined: 5 Apr 2016
Gender: Female
Posts: 1,397
Location: blah

16 Jan 2017, 10:25 am

neurotypicalET wrote:
When I was a young boy I used to be effeminate...but then again I was surrounded mostly by girls...aunts & cousins...so I guess that could be a factor....I mean if I were surrounded by dogs I would probably be more doglike .... :lol:


My mom seems to think that that's why her uncle is gay ... because he was the only boy among many sisters and when he was a baby they used to dress him as a little girl.