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What is your favorite Tea?
Chamomile 8%  8%  [ 8 ]
English Breakfast 22%  22%  [ 23 ]
Darjeeling 3%  3%  [ 3 ]
Earl Grey 13%  13%  [ 13 ]
Orange Pekoe 7%  7%  [ 7 ]
Ceylon 1%  1%  [ 1 ]
Herbal Tea 9%  9%  [ 9 ]
Chinese Jasmine Tea 4%  4%  [ 4 ]
Chinese Oolong Tea 4%  4%  [ 4 ]
Japanese Matcha / Green Tea 12%  12%  [ 12 ]
Japanese Mugicha / Barley Tea 1%  1%  [ 1 ]
Other 17%  17%  [ 18 ]
Total votes : 103

Yigeren
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27 Feb 2016, 9:43 pm

I'd love the opportunity to try more teas. I would like to buy spices to make my own chai, as I've found that there are many ways of doing it, and the types and amounts of the spices differ according to recipe.

The Indian store near my house should have many spices that I require, but I'm embarrassed to go in. The last time I went to an Indian food store, the owners (or perhaps only the people working there) kind of stared at me the whole time and made me feel as if I shouldn't be there. It was a different store, but now I'm afraid that I would be unwelcome because I'm white.

There are many south Asian dishes that I'd like to try making, but I need particular ingredients to do it, and now I'm too timid to go to the store. I guess I should just get over it, and accept that I may be stared at and not feel self-conscious.



0_equals_true
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28 Feb 2016, 7:33 am

You need to come to Tooting, it is spice heaven, and also super cheap quauilty veg, better the supermarket.

I understand that it can be intimidating, however bare in mind that Indians have a completely different body language. British Indians mostly don't, but in US they are less heavily populated. When I went to India it was completely different.

They are business minded, so they don't want discourage white people from shopping.

They can be brash, but actually mostly of them are really nice. They tend to have a formal polite way of talking. These shops are really cool. Does your self veg? Often they have better produce than supermarkets, and it is not over packaged.

Even if you don't ask, it the produce is no going to kill you. Try bitter gourd. :lol:
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Momordica_charantia

It is bitter, but healthy and I like it.

Regarding spice tea, or other dishes:

I suggest you don't try all the spices at once. Try single spices like cardamon, cinnamon, clove, ginger, fennel, black pepper in small quantities. Btw even something as simple as pepper, you can get better quality in these places.

Cardamon is deceptively strong, especially if fresh (fresh cardamon is bright green rather than the pale green that is commonly sold). Use the smallest whole one you can find. Or you can break one open and use 2-3 of the seeds. Black cardamom has a completely different taste, more savoury and subtle (but great for long cook curries an stews). You should leave this to brew for some time in hot water to infuse it.

Nutmeg just a tiny amount. Star anise is too, as is a little anise. One small clove.

Caraway is underrated IMO. Cumin, is very strong and has a generic madras taste if over used.

Some of them you may want to dry roast to get the aromatics. This is heating them low flame without burning for around 30-60 seconds. cloves puff up, fennel also works well.

Then you can work on combination 2-3 at a time. It changes things dramatically.



0_equals_true
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28 Feb 2016, 7:59 am

Yigeren wrote:
There are many south Asian dishes that I'd like to try making, but I need particular ingredients to do it, and now I'm too timid to go to the store. I guess I should just get over it, and accept that I may be stared at and not feel self-conscious.


Yeah do it! do it!

I have made some great south Asian dishes, from ingredient from these store. Thai, Laotian, Cambodian, Vietnamese, Indonesian, Malay, etc.

Also Indian, Pakistan, Sri Lankan...

These shops don't just supply their own sub-cultures, they also import stuff for other cultures too. They are very business orientated. They import African/Caribbean stuff, they admit they don't even know what it is. I know more about Cassava/Manioc/Yaka than they do, they asked me how to use it. They know there a market for it and it sells.



Yigeren
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28 Feb 2016, 1:49 pm

0_equals_true wrote:
You need to come to Tooting, it is spice heaven, and also super cheap quauilty veg, better the supermarket.

I understand that it can be intimidating, however bare in mind that Indians have a completely different body language. British Indians mostly don't, but in US they are less heavily populated. When I went to India it was completely different.

They are business minded, so they don't want discourage white people from shopping.

They can be brash, but actually mostly of them are really nice. They tend to have a formal polite way of talking. These shops are really cool. Does your self veg? Often they have better produce than supermarkets, and it is not over packaged.

Even if you don't ask, it the produce is no going to kill you. Try bitter gourd. :lol:
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Momordica_charantia

It is bitter, but healthy and I like it.

Regarding spice tea, or other dishes:

I suggest you don't try all the spices at once. Try single spices like cardamon, cinnamon, clove, ginger, fennel, black pepper in small quantities. Btw even something as simple as pepper, you can get better quality in these places.

Cardamon is deceptively strong, especially if fresh (fresh cardamon is bright green rather than the pale green that is commonly sold). Use the smallest whole one you can find. Or you can break one open and use 2-3 of the seeds. Black cardamom has a completely different taste, more savoury and subtle (but great for long cook curries an stews). You should leave this to brew for some time in hot water to infuse it.

Nutmeg just a tiny amount. Star anise is too, as is a little anise. One small clove.

Caraway is underrated IMO. Cumin, is very strong and has a generic madras taste if over used.

Some of them you may want to dry roast to get the aromatics. This is heating them low flame without burning for around 30-60 seconds. cloves puff up, fennel also works well.

Then you can work on combination 2-3 at a time. It changes things dramatically.


Thank you :)

I am actually used to a lot of spices in food. I'd like to get some green cardamom, star anise, cloves, etc. I know that the quality of spices is much better than what I'd find in a supermarket. I like curry pastes, too. I'd like to get some higher-quality premade ones to try before I'd make my own. I actually eat cinnamon sticks by themselves on occasion (true cinnamon, not cassia). I also chew on fennel seeds sometimes.

I enjoy "hot spicy" foods as well. I tend to enjoy foods with a lot of flavor, such as south Asian, southeast Asian, east Asian, Mediterranean, Mexican, etc.

I find many European foods to be lacking in vegetables and often bland. I'm not putting these foods down, but I don't enjoy the tastes as much. And I'm not much of a meat eater.

I will try your tips on using spices.



0_equals_true
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28 Feb 2016, 4:22 pm

Honestly, there are few good pre-made mixes / masalas, but the majority of the time you are better off making your own curry pastes and dry mixes if you can. There is not comparison.

I do get garam masala, but I actually making you own is better and you can make in in quantity and store in a jar.

What is sold as "curry powder" or "madras curry powder" is nothing of the sort. It has way too much cumin in it.

I have yet to find commercial Thai pastes, that are that good. I think they are ok, but nothing special. They need preservatives and stabilisers.

It is not as hard as you think. Some spice mixes you are never going to buy they don't sell it that way.

Something like Cambodian curry paste (Kroeung), this is simple to make once you know how. You just need one of those chopper/grinders.

Many curries you just need the spices, and a grinder. The sauce comes together during the cooking.



Yigeren
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28 Feb 2016, 4:32 pm

I would like to make my own garam masala, but I've read that everyone has their own family recipe, and that they may vary quite a bit. I wouldn't know which recipe to try.

Thai curry pastes are harder to find ingredients for around here. I have a recipe somewhere for red curry paste which I may try.

Haha, I know that "curry powder" that is sold in stores is not really curry. But, I have found it useful when making a particular chicken soup recipe.

Unfortunately around here, some ingredients just have to be ordered. I made my own mak kimchi, and it wasn't great because we don't really have Korean ingredients available here. Some things I could order, but there were items that were just too expensive to ship.

I ought to get a grinder, then go out and buy some spices to make. I know that they should be used relatively quickly once ground, for the best flavor. I think that some pastes can be frozen once made; at least that is what some people have recommended.



0_equals_true
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28 Feb 2016, 4:58 pm

Yes pastes can be frozen. Dry spices in airtight container.



AspieUtah
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28 Feb 2016, 5:06 pm

I haven't enjoyed tea since July 4, 1776. I have tried, but no success. It tastes like grass clippings to me.


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lostonearth35
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28 Feb 2016, 5:15 pm

I prefer tea over coffee and I worry sometimes that I may be a tea-aholic. :) A lot of people where I live like tea, mainly Orange Pekoe. But most people just call it "regular tea", as there are many other varieties now available. In fact I once asked for orange pekoe at a fast-food restaurant and even though the name of it was on the menu they were confused as to what I really wanted. Go figure.



0_equals_true
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28 Feb 2016, 6:14 pm

"Orange Pekoe" is actually a grading of tea leaf.

https://anewleafteaco.wordpress.com/201 ... oe-anyway/



MannyBoo
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29 Feb 2016, 11:39 pm

0_equals_true wrote:
How can you miss off Lapsang souchong?? :P It is one of the greats.

These are teas that I drink:

Earl Grey
Lapsang souchong
Darjeeling
Assam
English Breakfast

Cuo Technique: Water first. Dip in bags up an down. You can fold over the edge and poor directly though it. I don't like to leave it in there. I will reuse the bag an number of times. People who squeeze the bag with a spoon what up with that?

Pot technique, warm the pot, fill with water. put bag or loose (small amount). Remove the bag early.

I don't use sugar or milk. The taste of tea is complex and subtle so lemon is not welcome, except for Lipton ice tea which is an underwhelming refreshment.

Here are the herbal/fruit/root teas I drink:

Chamomile (calming)
Turkish apple tea (tip use a cafetiere)
Rooibos
Lemon grass (used to make it from fresh leaves not stem, also called fever grass in the Caribean)
Mint (fresh only + little sugar)
Ginger and Honey (fresh root or blend, good if nauseous with less/no honey)
Peppermint (for digestion)
Fennel (for digestion/IBS)
Lemon & Honey (when stuffed up)

Cordial with hot water:

Blackcurrant and Apple

I drink any of these as often as a feel like, it can be several time a day, or several days in-between. I don't drink proper tea too late, more likely to have herbal/fruit/root teas in the evening.

I guess I drink for comfort relaxation, enjoyment and taste, and some specific health uses. It is the whole sensation of it I like.

You can't "taste" tea without your nose as is mostly aromatics and tannins. So if you are stuffed up recommend lemon and honey, or something strong and fruity like blackcurrant and apple hot cordial. Then again use lemsip if you feel terrible (paracetamol hot drink)


Thanks for tea expert advise :)
It sounds good, I want to try

But what is Lapsang Souchong?? i dont know



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01 Mar 2016, 1:38 pm

MannyBoo wrote:
But what is Lapsang Souchong?? i dont know


A smoked tea from Fujian. Really nice tasting.



rocococat
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02 Mar 2016, 5:46 pm

1. Do you like to drink tea?
Yes!

2. How often do you drink it?
Depends on the day and my mood. Sometimes six times a day. Sometimes four times a day. Sometimes once a day.

3. What kind of tea do you like?
I absolutely love peach tea.

4. Do you like your tea straight, or with milk, sugar, or lemon?
Straight up. Tea is perfect just the way it is.

5.Why do you drink tea? For liquid? For health? For relaxation? For taste?
It tastes good. But I love the idea of using tea for herbal remedies.



Nocturnus
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07 Mar 2016, 2:05 am

Chamomile and Peppermint with Manuka Honey.

I tried Rooibos and I enjoyed that, I rarely drink traditional English tea now that I have discovered herbal tea.



PatriciaMorgan
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08 Mar 2016, 5:40 am

I don't like tea, except green tea.