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Do you cuss?
Yes, often 53%  53%  [ 24 ]
Occasionally 27%  27%  [ 12 ]
No 20%  20%  [ 9 ]
Total votes : 45

Tim_Tex
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02 Mar 2016, 11:20 am

Hellz yeah!


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naturalplastic
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02 Mar 2016, 12:40 pm

F**K NO!



auntblabby
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02 Mar 2016, 2:17 pm

kraftiekortie wrote:
It should be noted that "fock" means "penis" in dialectal Swedish. I read somewhere that it is of Dutch origin, and might have been a term used by sailors.

so that might mean that the movie "meet the fockers" might mean something else entirely? :lol: it's [at least in the aforementioned dialectal Swedish] mean the same as dicking somebody, IOW dicking=f-ing. Hmmmm... :chin:



auntblabby
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02 Mar 2016, 2:20 pm

some of the more extreme anti-cursors won't even say darn or heck or even express any outward angry emotion, biblical fundies are in that camp I have found. my brother is like that. the late garner ted Armstrong said even so much as an angry glower, in a biblical sense, is proscribed swearing. I wonder if Christianity is the only religion that bans swearing.



naturalplastic
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02 Mar 2016, 5:25 pm

auntblabby wrote:
kraftiekortie wrote:
It should be noted that "fock" means "penis" in dialectal Swedish. I read somewhere that it is of Dutch origin, and might have been a term used by sailors.

so that might mean that the movie "meet the fockers" might mean something else entirely? :lol: it's [at least in the aforementioned dialectal Swedish] mean the same as dicking somebody, IOW dicking=f-ing. Hmmmm... :chin:


Fokker was the Dutch genius who built the Kaiser's planes in WWI (like the Red Barron's Fokker Triplane).

The F word seems to have been either inherited by the Anglo Saxons from their common Teutonic ancestors with the Dutch, and the Germans. Or they got it via Scotland from the Viking invaders of Britain. Both theories point to an ancient Germanic origin of the word.

In 1066 the French Speaking Normans conquered England, and the native Anglo Saxon words were demoted to being improper. Or thats the assumption. So all of our cuss words are thought to be of Germanic, rather than of French/Latin origin.

Have read about that "fock" word in central Sweden. Its existence supports the Norse/Viking theory.

My own discovery: in German there is a word "fug" which can mean "to join", or to "unite", or it can be the noun "joint" as in carpentry. The G is actually pronounced more like a "k" according one translator site.



.



auntblabby
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02 Mar 2016, 5:46 pm

naturalplastic wrote:
My own discovery: in German there is a word "fug" which can mean "to join", or to "unite", or it can be the noun "joint" as in carpentry. The G is actually pronounced more like a "k" according one translator site. .

that was the euphemism norman mailer used in his war novel "the naked and the dead" when his publisher refused the original manuscript with the intact f-words. also in homage to mailer there was a rock group called "the fugs" who had a minor hit record, "slum goddess of the lower east side."



naturalplastic
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02 Mar 2016, 5:51 pm

auntblabby wrote:
some of the more extreme anti-cursors won't even say darn or heck or even express any outward angry emotion, biblical fundies are in that camp I have found. my brother is like that. the late garner ted Armstrong said even so much as an angry glower, in a biblical sense, is proscribed swearing. I wonder if Christianity is the only religion that bans swearing.




"Swearing" is "taking the Lord's name in vain", which is not quite the same thing as "cussing" which is "profanity" (saying the names of bodily functions) . But when you do one, you usually also do the other.

But even then in some translations of the Bible the rule against "taking the Lord's name in vain" seems to mean something more akin to blasphemy than to profanity.

My question is this: why are swear words called "swear words"?

In Victorian novels characters who stub their toes, or the like, are described as "sending up oaths".

Swearing an oath means to promise to do something.

But when you bang your finger with a hammer you don't yell "I do solemnly promise to defend, and uphold the Constitution of the USA". You say "gosh darn it to heck!". So what does the latter have to do with "swearing an oath"?



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02 Mar 2016, 5:58 pm

naturalplastic wrote:
auntblabby wrote:
some of the more extreme anti-cursors won't even say darn or heck or even express any outward angry emotion, biblical fundies are in that camp I have found. my brother is like that. the late garner ted Armstrong said even so much as an angry glower, in a biblical sense, is proscribed swearing. I wonder if Christianity is the only religion that bans swearing.




"Swearing" is "taking the Lord's name in vain", which is not quite the same thing as "cussing" which is "profanity" (saying the names of bodily functions) . But when you do one, you usually also do the other. But even then in some translations of the Bible the rule against "taking the Lord's name in vain" seems to mean something more akin to blasphemy than to profanity. My question is this: why are swear words called "swear words"? In Victorian novels characters who stub their toes, or the like, are described as "sending up oaths". Swearing an oath means to promise to do something. But when you bang your finger with a hammer you don't yell "I do solemnly promise to defend, and uphold the Constitution of the USA". You say "gosh darn it to heck!". So what does the latter have to do with "swearing an oath"?

because when you are swearing in the biblical manner you described, or oathing, you are saying things akin to "GD it to H." you are impiously putting yourself in the position of a god to swear or vow to damn something to hell or telling god to damn something to hell, both of them are banned in the Christian religion. don't know if it is blasphemous or sacrilegious or a desecration, always got those words confused.



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02 Mar 2016, 6:09 pm

Once when I was a teenager my older brother was having some sort of argument in the car with our mom, and she said "ain't", and then I asked a question where I also used the word "ain't". Then they both acted shocked, even though my mother had just said it herself.

This was back sometime in the late 80's to early 90's, but the way they reacted you'd think it was the early 1800's or something. :lol:

And we're not a bunch of bible-thumping Christians, either. We were just raised to believe there are other, better words to express how you feel.



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02 Mar 2016, 6:22 pm

lostonearth35 wrote:
Once when I was a teenager my older brother was having some sort of argument in the car with our mom, and she said "ain't", and then I asked a question where I also used the word "ain't". Then they both acted shocked, even though my mother had just said it herself. This was back sometime in the late 80's to early 90's, but the way they reacted you'd think it was the early 1800's or something. :lol: And we're not a bunch of bible-thumping Christians, either. We were just raised to believe there are other, better words to express how you feel.

what would they have thought if you said "ain't no" or "idn't"?



naturalplastic
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02 Mar 2016, 6:27 pm

auntblabby wrote:
naturalplastic wrote:
auntblabby wrote:
some of the more extreme anti-cursors won't even say darn or heck or even express any outward angry emotion, biblical fundies are in that camp I have found. my brother is like that. the late garner ted Armstrong said even so much as an angry glower, in a biblical sense, is proscribed swearing. I wonder if Christianity is the only religion that bans swearing.




"Swearing" is "taking the Lord's name in vain", which is not quite the same thing as "cussing" which is "profanity" (saying the names of bodily functions) . But when you do one, you usually also do the other. But even then in some translations of the Bible the rule against "taking the Lord's name in vain" seems to mean something more akin to blasphemy than to profanity. My question is this: why are swear words called "swear words"? In Victorian novels characters who stub their toes, or the like, are described as "sending up oaths". Swearing an oath means to promise to do something. But when you bang your finger with a hammer you don't yell "I do solemnly promise to defend, and uphold the Constitution of the USA". You say "gosh darn it to heck!". So what does the latter have to do with "swearing an oath"?

because when you are swearing in the biblical manner you described, or oathing, you are saying things akin to "GD it to H." you are impiously putting yourself in the position of a god to swear or vow to damn something to hell or telling god to damn something to hell, both of them are banned in the Christian religion. don't know if it is blasphemous or sacrilegious or a desecration, always got those words confused.


Makes sense.

Basically blasphemy.



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02 Mar 2016, 11:14 pm

I started cursing a lot 1ce South Park came out. I started cursing less 1ce I quit being a teen but I still curse pretty regularly but only in environments where it's OK.


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02 Mar 2016, 11:33 pm

I doubt if anybody else here is old enough to remember, but for the longest time no profanity whatsoever was allowed in the American print and broadcast media, you could barely get away with saying "heckacopter." there is an old 50s era kinescope I saw on youtube featuring nat king cole singing "anything goes" where on the lyric "Good authors too who once knew better words, Now only use four letter words Writing prose, Anything Goes" - he was forced to substitute "THREE letter words" plus hold up 3 fingers to reinforce the point!



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02 Mar 2016, 11:58 pm

I do. I just don't do it as often. :lol: I barely swear online, but it's different in real life.


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03 Mar 2016, 2:52 am

Frequently.


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03 Mar 2016, 6:52 am

auntblabby wrote:
some of the more extreme anti-cursors won't even say darn or heck or even express any outward angry emotion, biblical fundies are in that camp I have found. my brother is like that. the late garner ted Armstrong said even so much as an angry glower, in a biblical sense, is proscribed swearing. I wonder if Christianity is the only religion that bans swearing.


Pitched a tent in that camp for awhile. Didn't fit in for obvious reasons... :lol:

But yeah even thinking curse words, or even the anger typically behind them, is considered sinful.

f**k that! :D