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kraftiekortie
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09 May 2016, 8:53 pm

I bet you heard "One small step for man, one giant step for Mankind" quite well.

Where were you when Apollo 11 landed?

I was in summer camp in Pennsylvania, listening to Led Zeppelin on the loudspeaker. I was 8 years old. They bought is into a room with a black-and-white console TV. There, we watch the Eagle land!



zkydz
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09 May 2016, 9:00 pm

kraftiekortie wrote:
I bet you heard "One small step for man, one giant step for Mankind" quite well.

Where were you when Apollo 11 landed?

I was in summer camp in Pennsylvania, listening to Led Zeppelin on the loudspeaker. I was 8 years old. They bought is into a room with a black-and-white console TV. There, we watch the Eagle land!
Actually, I didn;t hear it that well. Took a lot of repetition to understand it.

I was 8, in Jacksonville Florida to see my Mother for the summer. But, I could never understand those things. I always had to listen very, very closely to get anything.

But, I have trouble with echoey areas, too much ambient sound, and some voices are just impossible and it's embarrassing.


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kraftiekortie
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09 May 2016, 9:04 pm

My brother lives near Jacksonville.

Genius is a hard thing, I find.



zkydz
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09 May 2016, 9:07 pm

kraftiekortie wrote:
Genius is a hard thing, I find.
????? LOL...I hope you weren't accusing me of being genius. LOL There are people here who would be greatly insulted. LOL

How are you doing Kraftie? Last time I saw you post, you were not doing well. Better?


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kraftiekortie
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09 May 2016, 9:10 pm

I'm doing all right.

I can sense that you have some sort of genius in you.

I think, to a certain extent, you benefited from it.

But you also experience irritations because of it. That's the plight of many-a-genius.

I, myself, have no genius. I'm more like a jack-of-all-trades with no ability in traditional "trades."



zkydz
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09 May 2016, 9:20 pm

kraftiekortie wrote:
I, myself, have no genius. I'm more like a jack-of-all-trades with no ability in traditional "trades."
Actually, that's me. I benefited from being in a profession at the right time that, for a while accepted my oddities. But, I've aged out of them and the field is overtaking me to the point I can't adjust.

And, I swear I'm the luckiest SOB on the planet. In 89 I came to NYC with only $200.00 in my pocket and almost a month before I got paid. I got by on the kindness of strangers. I am a modern day Scarlett O'hara. I have no idea why I got to where I did. I accept it. I revel in it. But I am vastly confused by it.

And, the more I loop through my life, looking through this new prism, I do not know how I did anything to the level I did.


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kraftiekortie
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09 May 2016, 9:21 pm

Because you have it in you.

The people were generous to you because they wanted to be generous to you.



zkydz
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09 May 2016, 9:34 pm

kraftiekortie wrote:
Because you have it in you.

The people were generous to you because they wanted to be generous to you.

Ok...how about this:

In February, I did a job that the pay showed up just at the right time when my wife left me. Managed to get my unemployment going because it's the only reliable online service. Everything else requires going to the damned offices and at this point, I can't get out to get the rest of the benefits I am actually due. I can barely make work (semester ended tonight...*whew*), the doctors and if I run out of food, and finally get hungry, then I shop.

Yet, even though I am so freakin' short of money, and done no real work in almost 2 years, I have managed to get some small paying jobs that are buying the food (old clients who have popped up out of the blue). And, the one guy I went to was the dream client. Out of years and years and years of hard to deal with clients (my issues, not theirs'. They were all perfectly fine, I guess...it can't all be them if I'm the only common denominator) I get the one guy I can actually talk to and be somewhat comfortable. That will be slow going, but that is good too.

Self diagnosed in October/November with Asperger's. No money to spare...managed to get proper Dx in 7 months.

All of that was luck. No planning whatsoever.

And, even if it's been the kindness of strangers. I can't depend on that. Time, at my age, to start earning my dues in life the proper way. Time to be the stranger who helps instead of always being helped.


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RAADS-R -- 213.3
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Aspie Quiz -- 186 out of 200
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kraftiekortie
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09 May 2016, 9:50 pm

I agree with what you say about helping people.

I wouldn't call it "paying dues," though. I'd call it just being decent to people.



zkydz
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09 May 2016, 10:01 pm

kraftiekortie wrote:
I agree with what you say about helping people.

I wouldn't call it "paying dues," though. I'd call it just being decent to people.

Yeah, but I'm finding out that I really suck at it. Like I said, time to change.


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Jensen
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10 May 2016, 1:38 am

What a shame, the sound doesn´t work out. I´ve seen that in other videos recordings done in a large room with audience. The combination of interfering sounds mixed with the resonance muddles the speakers voice.
Apart from that, I understood bits and pieces - and you seem very confident. Keep at it, but make sure, that whoever is recording it, sits right in front of the loudspeakers, so interference from the room will come out less dominant.


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Ecomatt91
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10 May 2016, 5:27 pm

Can any moderators close this thread please? Its gone off topic now and its pointless that my video inspires other aspies. At Least I tried my efforts. I felt like I wasted my time presenting at this conference because no one approached to me after the session closed. They all approached to other speakers who aren't on the spectrum. The world is upside down because it like no one is paying attention to the aspie's perspective. That why the problems still hasn't solved, by not considering the involvement of the aspie in the society.



AspieUtah
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10 May 2016, 6:05 pm

I enjoyed it. Please let me know about any future YouTube.com videos you produce. Thanks!


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btbnnyr
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11 May 2016, 12:10 pm

If the audience did not seem interested your presentation, you could try tweaking your presentation, but I wouldn't give up on presenting if you really want to present and increase involvment of autistic people in autism issues.

I think a wide audience may find it hard to relate to individual stories, like autobiography style stories. I think they may relate more to practical topics about day to day functioning. Like how you deal with different kinds of social situations, for example. But not like very specific examples from your life. The information has to be presented in a generalizable way that may apply to others, at least in some aspects.


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