Autism support groups, useless for those high functioning

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PrivatePyle99
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24 Jun 2016, 5:01 pm

SocOfAutism wrote:
THANK YOU. I have been saying this same thing. People don't want to hear from people who are doing well, and don't want to fine tune the skills of people who are doing okay. All the support services out there are for people at a crisis level, and then they only try to get them to the bare minimum, not to their highest level of functioning. They ignore soft skills like relationships and personal lives, which are obviously important to a person's overall well-being.



This is what I was wondering while reading these posts. If it's so bad, what about peer led support groups? I haven't been diagnosed yet, just had my testing today, but I'm pretty sure it'll come back positive. Being new to this, I've got a lot to learn and I don't know another person with Aspergers. I'd love to be able to find a group that I could attend just to learn more about what I can do to better handle life. I'm not doing so great right now.


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Your neurodiverse (Aspie) score: 140 of 200
Your neurotypical (non-autistic) score: 59 of 200
You are very likely neurodiverse (Aspie)


marshall
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25 Jun 2016, 6:31 pm

Tawaki wrote:
I hear people using mental health services b***h about this too. I'm a computer programmer. I have a college degree, and they want me stocking shelves. Well, this person has been out of the work place 10 years, or never held a job. Or I want to learn how to make apps for mobile phones, which is a new skill set. Those classes/placements are not for that.

The issue is that doing a job that actually utilizes the brain is NECESSARY for some people. It is not about money or status. It's about having a purpose to live for. Spending all day doing a repetitive mindless job leads to depression because my mind will only think about awful things. The work is not significantly distracting enough. It doesn't engage me.



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25 Jun 2016, 8:27 pm

I would dread to find or place myself in the context of an "all in" support group - ie Autism Speaks-type parents of AS children, AS high functioning adults, ditto children, severely impaired adults, ditto children and everything in between, curebies (who view disability as the only focus) and "maximists" (who believe in playing to strengths, finding the ability in disability) - even though I would fit into two of these categories. I would rather stick the proverbial pins into my eyes.

Just imagine me in a group like that if there were curebie parents present insisting that vaccines cause autism and that bleach cures it! I would probably have to be restrained from assaulting them.

Capable AS adults must be anathema to those parents - because that we exist at all as adults who have functioned sometimes better in life than themselves - must be a daunting and unwelcome challenge to their one-focus mindset of of ridding their children of the "accursed disease" whatever it takes "for their own good". I can imagine the hate and resentment in their eyes. I wouldn't ever want to be in an atmosphere like that.

As for a group of only adults, from all parts of the spectrum, perhaps. Though there are political divides there, too, and perhaps the support part would be contaminated by resentments too, and if it became a who-is-the-most-impaired focus or competition. I would be out of there so fast.

I don't know any AS adult (and I know a few) who found any benefit in either kind of group. Some have found a lot of benefit in groups dedicated to their own subgroup though, there is one that exists here (quietly) for AS women who blog and also offer a peer support system to other women with AS, so it focuses on their issues specifically - of being ASD women in their own lives and in this culture, and reading the blogs it sounds really supportive and productive. If I was a joiner (which I am not) it would probably be the right group for me and would be supportive.



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25 Jun 2016, 9:59 pm

SocOfAutism wrote:
If I can get something going at a place with a good wi-fi signal, I don't see why I couldn't start broadcasting it for people who aren't local.


Make sure you record the sessions. Then you can peddle them forever. And think what a wide audience you can reach then!


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26 Jun 2016, 12:33 am

marshall wrote:
Tawaki wrote:
I hear people using mental health services b***h about this too. I'm a computer programmer. I have a college degree, and they want me stocking shelves. Well, this person has been out of the work place 10 years, or never held a job. Or I want to learn how to make apps for mobile phones, which is a new skill set. Those classes/placements are not for that.

The issue is that doing a job that actually utilizes the brain is NECESSARY for some people. It is not about money or status. It's about having a purpose to live for. Spending all day doing a repetitive mindless job leads to depression because my mind will only think about awful things. The work is not significantly distracting enough. It doesn't engage me.


That's what happened to me when I was working at the factory 20 years ago. My job placement officer found me the most simplest job on purpose.


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Tawaki
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26 Jun 2016, 9:37 am

Adult Aspergers support groups are very hard to find and keep going.

My husband's group struggles to keep it geared towards *adults*, but they get many parents who show up and get pissed off when adults Aspies give their take on social skills classes, IEP, GFCF diets....

There was another group for adults in our area, but that person flopped it over to children and parents only. Many more people to support the group, more options to offer, and a more hopeful vibe.

The support group has a hard time because we have no decent mass transit, and the adults aren't college kids. When you have a wife, family and kids and or work, burning off an evening for a support group is tough. They have moved the times all over the place. Tried weekends, which no one could do.

They also skate a very thin line on what public topics can be offered. No one cares if you talk about dating problems in the group. It's if you advertise that group will be about dating and dealing with human relationships. If it smacks of group therapy, the group can't run. If it sounds more authoritative than what you can grab off of Google, you better have a credentialed guest speaker. What to know about the ADA got cancelled because the group needed someone like a social worker, advocate or attorney to head it up. The group found a lawyer to help run that session (which they had to pay).

All about practicing without a license. The place they use the room for the meetings is very picky about what is advertised. Even the local churches give you the once over. We thought church meeting rooms might be easier, but no.

Also with some Aspies, the thought of getting dressed, getting to a venue, being around 10+ people you don't know, worrying about sensory overload makes visiting a IRL support group almost impossible.