Finished High School level math, looking for books!

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opraaa
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10 Jul 2016, 2:09 am

Hey there,

I just finished my Calculus course in High School, despite having another two years to complete. Because of this, I was able to get into a program at a local university so I can take first and second year math courses. Over the Summer, however, I would like to get a bit of a jump start and am unsure what textbooks I should read in order to do so. I have been recommend Spivak's 'Caluclus', but I find the way he explains concepts and ideas to be very hard to discern and understand.

I'd love it if any of you had any recommendations!

Thanks!
opraaa



BTDT
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10 Jul 2016, 8:50 am

https://www.amazon.com/Mathematics-Elem ... 0195105192
I'd suggest this revision of a classic book by Courant and Robbins--not only is a great book, but quite inexpensive at $14!



slave
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11 Jul 2016, 7:57 pm

opraaa wrote:
Hey there,

I just finished my Calculus course in High School, despite having another two years to complete. Because of this, I was able to get into a program at a local university so I can take first and second year math courses. Over the Summer, however, I would like to get a bit of a jump start and am unsure what textbooks I should read in order to do so. I have been recommend Spivak's 'Caluclus', but I find the way he explains concepts and ideas to be very hard to discern and understand.

I'd love it if any of you had any recommendations!

Thanks!
opraaa


There are HUGE quantities of Maths e-books on nearly ever topic and @ every level.
Many of them are FREE.
Don't spend $$$$ if you don't have to. :D


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28 Jul 2016, 9:23 pm

opraaa wrote:
Hey there,

I just finished my Calculus course in High School, despite having another two years to complete. Because of this, I was able to get into a program at a local university so I can take first and second year math courses. Over the Summer, however, I would like to get a bit of a jump start and am unsure what textbooks I should read in order to do so. I have been recommend Spivak's 'Caluclus', but I find the way he explains concepts and ideas to be very hard to discern and understand.

I'd love it if any of you had any recommendations!

Thanks!
opraaa


The best thing to do is just to find out what books the classes you will be taking are using, and also try to get a hold of old home works and tests with solutions from those classes. Be sure they are also from the same instructor.



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06 Aug 2016, 11:59 pm

Here is an online book on multivariable calculus: http://people.math.gatech.edu/~cain/notes/calculus.html


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