The less things you own, the more free you are?

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Kuraudo777
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11 Jul 2016, 3:39 pm

IN the latest episode of Clannad that I've watched, Tomoya and Nagisa live in a cheap, small apartment with just a living room [with a dresser, table, and closet for the sleeping mats], tiny kitchen with a stove, fridge, and cooking stuff, and a bathroom. I think I could easily live like that [though not in an apartment], except I can't get rid of my books. >.<


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Froya
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11 Jul 2016, 3:44 pm

McCat wrote:
I think living simple without much stuff really is freeing. And maybe it's good for a lot of people with Autism too.

I used to collect things when I was younger. I collected a lot of things :wink: My house was a mess and I didn't know how to clean either. Because how can you clean when everything is full with stuff? I felt depressed. I bought stuff to make me happy, but I felt like I couldn't move at home.

So a few years ago, during a nightly browsing session, I found people in America discussing how to organise. It seemed to be a hype. Pinterest was full of tips. I read for a few weeks and went for it.

It took a lot of time, but now my house is like I want it. It's clean and I don't have a lot of stuff anymore. I feel freed. And I keep feeling freed everytime I come home. It cleared up my head as well. I don't need collections anymore. I only keep things I really love and it makes me happy.

So yes, I agree with your topic title! :D

sounds like you have found the healthy middle ground, when it comes to this :)



Froya
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11 Jul 2016, 3:53 pm

Kuraudo777 wrote:
IN the latest episode of Clannad that I've watched, Tomoya and Nagisa live in a cheap, small apartment with just a living room [with a dresser, table, and closet for the sleeping mats], tiny kitchen with a stove, fridge, and cooking stuff, and a bathroom. I think I could easily live like that [though not in an apartment], except I can't get rid of my books. >.<

I'm on the lookout for a small apartment, about 30 square meters in size. It will be something like what you are describing here.



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11 Jul 2016, 3:53 pm

Froya wrote:
sounds like you have found the healthy middle ground, when it comes to this :)



Absolutely! Thanks to Pinterest and the book of Marie Kondo. She might be my soulmate :D



sonicallysensitive
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11 Jul 2016, 5:53 pm

It possibly depends on what you own.

There's a freedom in owning large value assets (i.e. a number of properties (no mortgages)).

Financial freedom is a freedom. Money is still a 'thing'.



The issue is possibly partly cultural.

It'll possibly be the case that the poorer the majority of the West becomes, the more the media will promote an image of 'less is more'.

Maybe.



ASS-P
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11 Jul 2016, 5:56 pm

...Nyeh . Considering how little I own :cry: .


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13 Jul 2016, 6:45 pm

It feels good to get rid of stuff and open up more space...to get new stuff. lol

I like having extra things put away, to have a surplus in case of bad times or high prices or whatever. I feel more of a sense of freedom in that, than in being minimalist.



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13 Jul 2016, 6:56 pm

EzraS wrote:
Some of the freeest looking people I see are those in westerns who travle all over and all they own fits into a couple of saddlebags.

I try to live lightly. After all, an individual can own a library, but a favorite book is still the desired reading. I have bought and sold (or donated) my various collections several times over.


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slave
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13 Jul 2016, 7:40 pm

Attachment in the Buddhist sense is the issue of highest importance here(as it relates to feeling free or bound about objects)

The number of object you have around you is irrelevant....the core issue is whether or not you have an attachment to those objects.

Even a mendicant monk can suffer with an attachment to her/his begging bowl.

Attachment to any object(or idea or person etc....i digress) always creates grounds for mental suffering (eg. the fear of losing it, mistrust of others, and many many more).

I struggle a lot with this issue.

Hope an Eastern perspective is of some value. :)



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13 Jul 2016, 8:07 pm

I have a tendency to accumulate things and I've had to toss stuff out. Fortunately, today I can acquire many things like movies, art, or music in digital form so it doesn't actually take up space other than my hard drive.



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13 Jul 2016, 8:31 pm

There are five main tenets in Jainism, the 5th one being "own little, want little." It's call aparigraha. Our Digambar monks take it to the extreme by not even owning clothes. Anyway, owning little and wanting little frees me to do other things, like write books. I currently live on $2,000/year. This is what I own:

My used car.
This used laptop.
One pair of pants.
Two shirts.
One pair of shoes.
A blanket.
A sleeping bag.

It'd be nice if I didn't own clothes, but if tried that around here I'd be arrested with the quickness.



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13 Jul 2016, 9:25 pm

...But I have practically NOTHING ! :( And I am pretty down about it :cry: .


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Renal kidney failure, congestive heart failure, COPD. Can't really get up from a floor position unhelped anymore:-(.
One of the walking wounded ~ SMASHED DOWN by life and age, now prevented from even expressing myself! SOB.
" Oh, no! First you have to PROVE you deserve to go away to college! " ~ My mother, 1978 (the heyday of Andy Gibb and Player). I would still like to go.:-(
My life destroyed by Thorazine and Mellaril - and rape - and the Psychiatric/Industrial Complex. SOB:-(! !! !! !! !! !! !! !! !! !!


Kuraudo777
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14 Jul 2016, 11:32 am

I recently cleaned out my closet, and now I have a little hide-y place. :D I also cleaned out a lot of stuff in my room that I no longer want nor need. :cheers:


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Froya
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14 Jul 2016, 4:12 pm

slave wrote:
Attachment in the Buddhist sense is the issue of highest importance here(as it relates to feeling free or bound about objects)

The number of object you have around you is irrelevant....the core issue is whether or not you have an attachment to those objects.

Even a mendicant monk can suffer with an attachment to her/his begging bowl.

Attachment to any object(or idea or person etc....i digress) always creates grounds for mental suffering (eg. the fear of losing it, mistrust of others, and many many more).

I struggle a lot with this issue.

Hope an Eastern perspective is of some value. :)

I think not being able to attach to things is the reason why I'm like this. I don't think it's a postive thing for me, and I think it's the fear of loss that lies underneath.

A few years back I decided to try and sell some of my art, and it was very hard to make that decision. It felt like something died inside or something, and I haven't been able to attach to the paintings/drawings ever since.

I wouldn't say it bothers me that much though, and I'm not going to try and change it. In fact I hope I'll find something more I can get rid of! he he



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14 Jul 2016, 5:15 pm

^
Frankly I think the Buddhist view of attachment to objects can be taken too far. I guess it was mainly designed for folks who want to be monks. If a possession gives pleasure, I don't see it as all that wrong, or even humanly avoidable, to feel sorrow at its loss and to fear losing it, to some extent, though obviously excessive attachment to things can become unhealthy. I think your strong reluctance to attach to your new art work shows how dropping this attachment thing doesn't really solve the attachment "problem." Rather like a war veteran whose close friends have been killed in front of him ceases to want to make new friends, or a person with bad experiences of relationships loses the motivation to try again. The hope is that such folks eventually find the strength to invest themselves again and to take the risk of it going wrong, knowing that if it does, it will hurt.



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14 Jul 2016, 5:22 pm

I don't own much; in fact, everything I own fits inside my SUV. I will admit I usually aim in buying quality items I need, in hopes they will last. I absolutely hate clutter... Probably why my dream home is a studio or 1-bedroom apartment in downtown.