Effect on children of the 2016 presidential campaign

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jrjones9933
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16 Oct 2016, 1:55 pm

April report on comments of students and teachers

They explicitly state that it the statistics are only for a non random subset, but the raw number of reports makes me feel sad and anxious about what a scientific study would find currently.


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BaalChatzaf
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16 Oct 2016, 6:43 pm

jrjones9933 wrote:
April report on comments of students and teachers

They explicitly state that it the statistics are only for a non random subset, but the raw number of reports makes me feel sad and anxious about what a scientific study would find currently.


Few children under 15 will pay any attention to the nonsense unless the parents make an issue of it.


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jrjones9933
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16 Oct 2016, 6:45 pm

When a little girl at a rally told Pence that what Trump said made her feel bad to look in the mirror, he replied that they were going to destroy ISIS.

I guess her sacrifice is necessary for the greater good. I'm curious how it fits into Trump's plan, but I guess he'd be giving too much away by specifying how the two things are related.


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jrjones9933
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16 Oct 2016, 6:47 pm

BaalChatzaf wrote:
jrjones9933 wrote:
April report on comments of students and teachers

They explicitly state that it the statistics are only for a non random subset, but the raw number of reports makes me feel sad and anxious about what a scientific study would find currently.


Few children under 15 will pay any attention to the nonsense unless the parents make an issue of it.


Like, by discussing politics where they can hear it, or what? Are you implying that the parents of the bullies reported in the survey were coached by their parents?


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Campin_Cat
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17 Oct 2016, 12:47 am

BaalChatzaf wrote:
Few children under 15 will pay any attention to the nonsense unless the parents make an issue of it.

I wouldn't be so sure about that. I've heard, more-than-once on TV, that kids have been ASSIGNED to watch the Presidential debates. Now, grant it, I'm not positive about the AGE of the kids receiving these assignments----but, I could see a seventh-grader getting that assignment from their Social Studies teacher; and, how old's a seventh grader----like, 12-years-old?






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17 Oct 2016, 5:03 am

I had to watch presidential debates for social studies assignments as early as Bush vs. Kerry in... holy crap, 6th grade feels like just yesterday to me. We weren't as informed on all the campaign minutiae as our parents or teachers, and definitely didn't understand the relevant issues as much as we should have, but we definitely cared and discussed the election.


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17 Oct 2016, 6:08 am

BaalChatzaf wrote:
jrjones9933 wrote:
April report on comments of students and teachers

They explicitly state that it the statistics are only for a non random subset, but the raw number of reports makes me feel sad and anxious about what a scientific study would find currently.


Few children under 15 will pay any attention to the nonsense unless the parents make an issue of it.


This was true during the tumultuous times of the late 1960's. My dad had the news on every night at dinner time so I knew about it but no other kids discussed this. Now with social media and headlines on thier devices it is unavoidable.


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EzraS
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17 Oct 2016, 10:58 am

Campin_Cat wrote:
BaalChatzaf wrote:
Few children under 15 will pay any attention to the nonsense unless the parents make an issue of it.

I wouldn't be so sure about that. I've heard, more-than-once on TV, that kids have been ASSIGNED to watch the Presidential debates. Now, grant it, I'm not positive about the AGE of the kids receiving these assignments----but, I could see a seventh-grader getting that assignment from their Social Studies teacher; and, how old's a seventh grader----like, 12-years-old?


It depends of the kid of course. But I'm sure there's plenty of 12 year olds who do follow politics. Especially if their parents and or older siblings are into it and they are following along with that. And it is the kind of thing that gets assigned in middle school. I basically didn't pay any attention to the 2012 election. I'm paying a lot more attention to this one. But a part of that is because of what a total circus it is. If it was like say Sanders running against Cruz, I probably wouldn't be nearly as interested.



jrjones9933
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17 Oct 2016, 11:40 am

Skim the report, or do a word search for elementary, as in elementary school.


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17 Oct 2016, 3:50 pm

Yes, there are children who care about the election. Even in elementary school, I have seen them do mock polls for President. I know they should be kids, playing and happily enjoying their childhood right now, but the election is unavoidable. If the kids live in a Republican family, they will most likely think Trump is awesome. Same with democrat families about Hillary. Young students don't have the strong thinking of adults, but they get everything from their parents and from television, the political ads, etc.



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17 Oct 2016, 5:33 pm

Symbolically, the president is like a father or mother of the country. Some people say it's silly to look at character - we should just look at policies, but I disagree. Keeping in mind the limited powers of the president, the main purpose of the president is to be a benevolent, kind and wise father/mother to the country. You don't even necessarily have to look at their policies. You can often guess what their policies are by their personality (I know I get a lot of flack for this but it's true). A benevolent, wise, and kind person is less likely to get joy out of bombing other countries for example They might have to do it but at least it's not the first thing they look for.

As far as younger kids they probably could care less but they are still going to hear their parents talk about it and they are going to absorb what they say which could lead to some embarrassing misbehavior.



jrjones9933
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20 Oct 2016, 7:46 pm

Children with disabilities are two to three times more likely to be bullied. How much more likely is a Mexican child with a disability to be bullied this year? Are there any more questions about intersectionality? I thought not.


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Kraichgauer
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20 Oct 2016, 9:33 pm

Well, it's fitting for children to express interest in this Presidential campaign, as Trump is so damn childish.


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