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Karategurl
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22 Jan 2017, 2:50 pm

Is autism level 2 high functioning?



PhosphorusDecree
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22 Jan 2017, 3:48 pm

I think the "levels" are for recommending how much help you get, not how severe your autism is.

According to this site, http://nspt4kids.com/healthtopics-and-c ... se/autism/ they are:
Level 3: “Requiring very substantial support”
Level 2: “Requiring substantial support”
Level 1: “Requiring support”

So, it's more about the doctor who diagnosed you making it easier for you to get help. People could move between levels as life gets easier or harder, without being more or less autistic. This is part of the new system of diagnosis, which is just as confusing and inconsistent as the old system. (They didn't even bother to tell me my level.)


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IstominFan
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22 Jan 2017, 3:57 pm

These explanations of "support" are also very confusing. I assume they mean in need of services. "Needing substantial support" could apply easily to very needy NTs who constantly need people around them to validate them. Instead of "support," which we all need from time to time in very emotional situations, I think "services" would be a better word.



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23 Jan 2017, 12:04 am

IstominFan wrote:
These explanations of "support" are also very confusing. I assume they mean in need of services. "Needing substantial support" could apply easily to very needy NTs who constantly need people around them to validate them. Instead of "support," which we all need from time to time in very emotional situations, I think "services" would be a better word.

I was thinking a 'level 0.5: Occasional Support Recommended' would be a nice addition, but also think your wording change works better for all existing "levels".

I wasn't assigned a level (pre-2013 dx), but did get assistance "services" in school. It could have been a 1 back then, but I'd take a 0.5 today... even thought it doesn't exist. :?



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23 Jan 2017, 6:37 am

On those support levels, I should have something like level 1.5 instead. Karategurl, were you told why you recieved level 2?


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IstominFan
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23 Jan 2017, 10:21 am

Level 2 is considered mid-range, but it looks as though you function far better than that. You express yourself in writing quite well. These descriptions of functioning sound like a lot of psychological mishmash.



milksnake
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23 Jan 2017, 10:58 am

Isn't high functioning defined by I.Q. score (i.e. above 80)?



somanyspoons
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23 Jan 2017, 11:36 am

milksnake wrote:
Isn't high functioning defined by I.Q. score (i.e. above 80)?


No. It's defined by level of support needed. You could be a genius at a level three if you were not able to get through the day without self-harming and/or required communication support because you do not speak.



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23 Jan 2017, 11:40 am

No, IQ is unrelated to how well you can get by in the community.
It is entirely possible to have a very high IQ and need lots of support, or have a low IQ and still live independently.

http://paulcooijmans.com/intelligence/iq_ranges.html
This page suggests that someone with an IQ as low as 50 may be able to live independently.

Someone who is violent--bites other people, is not employable and can't live independently, no matter what their IQ.



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23 Jan 2017, 11:44 am

There have been people with conditions such as Down Syndrome, who might have an IQ of 50, who are able to live independently.

There are some who have extremely high IQ's who are unable to live independently for various reasons (some related to physical disability; others related to mental troubles).



EzraS
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23 Jan 2017, 12:14 pm

Karategurl wrote:
Is autism level 2 high functioning?


I think that depends on where the bar is being set on what's supposed to be high functioning. As a level 2 myself, I've been referred to as anything from high functioning to having moderate to severe autism. Considering the amount of support I need overall, I personally would call myself moderately functioning in a lot of areas. But also high functioning in a few other areas.

Technically as far as I know, low functioning refers to also having been diagnosed as intellectually disabled.



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12 Feb 2017, 1:51 pm

PhosphorusDecree wrote:
I think the "levels" are for recommending how much help you get, not how severe your autism is.

According to this site, http://nspt4kids.com/healthtopics-and-c ... se/autism/ they are:
Level 3: “Requiring very substantial support”
Level 2: “Requiring substantial support”
Level 1: “Requiring support”

This is part of the new system of diagnosis, which is just as confusing and inconsistent as the old system. (They didn't even bother to tell me my level.)

I agree with PhosphorusDecree. I wouldn't worry too much about the levels too much. The important thing is that you get support that you need.

I was never told my functioning level either. Just that I had scores that put me in the severe end of level 2 AND scores that put me in the mild end of level 1.


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Goth Fairy
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13 Feb 2017, 2:12 am

Exuvian wrote:
IstominFan wrote:
These explanations of "support" are also very confusing. I assume they mean in need of services. "Needing substantial support" could apply easily to very needy NTs who constantly need people around them to validate them. Instead of "support," which we all need from time to time in very emotional situations, I think "services" would be a better word.

I was thinking a 'level 0.5: Occasional Support Recommended' would be a nice addition, but also think your wording change works better for all existing "levels".

I wasn't assigned a level (pre-2013 dx), but did get assistance "services" in school. It could have been a 1 back then, but I'd take a 0.5 today... even thought it doesn't exist. :?


That's me too! Although I didn't get support in school, I probably needed it. My psychologist actually had a diagram of big right-angled triangled, with level 3 at the the bootom (the widest end) and NT at the top point. She said I would probably have qualified as level 1 when I was younger, but my experiences and interests have given me bunch of "tools" which help me cope. She drew a line on the diagram and said "you are here" about half way between autistic traits and level 1, because I no longer need that extra support. But if I get tired or stressed then I become (or maybe display) more autistic. It was really helpful.

I do think sometimes though occasional support would help, like when in a situation of transition like a new job or if something bad happened like one of my family ended up in hospital. Some things still stress me out, and I usually respond by withdrawing into my brain and doing as little as possible.


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