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FlySwine
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31 Jan 2017, 12:20 pm

For example, I used a big word when talking to two boys as a child( not even that big, just unusual) and they smiled at each other, which made me realise that not everybody knows the words that I do, so I tried to dumb down from that point on.



the_phoenix
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31 Jan 2017, 12:27 pm

We don't seem to learn
because we're like Charlie Brown
when year after year,
Lucy smiles and says,
"I'll hold the football and you come running up and kick it ... "
Then every year,
Charlie Brown comes running up,
Lucy pulls the football away at the last minute,
Charlie Brown falls to the ground embarrassed,
and Lucy stands over him and gloats.



Such is life.



BTDT
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31 Jan 2017, 12:28 pm

The intelligence of those on the spectrum vary greatly, though the term Aspie is typically defined to exclude those with low IQ.

Not everyone has access to the same educational opportunities. You could be very bright, but not have access to the Internet or a library where you could learn big words. When I was young I could just walk into engineering libraries and look at books. By the time I became an adult access was often restricted to students and staff.



Fraser_1990
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31 Jan 2017, 12:56 pm

the_phoenix wrote:
We don't seem to learn
because we're like Charlie Brown
when year after year,
Lucy smiles and says,
"I'll hold the football and you come running up and kick it ... "
Then every year,
Charlie Brown comes running up,
Lucy pulls the football away at the last minute,
Charlie Brown falls to the ground embarrassed,
and Lucy stands over him and gloats.



Such is life.


I agree with this. Women are wicked (especially little girls). I'm the gullible Charlie Brown and can't help but be misguided by the female charm trap. :oops: :lol:


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SocOfAutism
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31 Jan 2017, 12:59 pm

I have an academic article around here somewhere about some nurses who ranked autistic people at the bottom of types of patients they would want to work with, partially because they were "incapable of learning."

An unbelievably cruel and untrue stereotype. Even if you say it about yourself.

None of us remember in perfect detail how ridiculous each of us were as small children. Yet each of us improved, learned SOMETHING that helps us function now. Even if someone appears not to be learning and improving, I promise you, they are improving in a way that may not be perceptible to you, or perhaps to themselves.



BTDT
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31 Jan 2017, 1:10 pm

The big issue is that Aspies learn differently.
I think many people are annoyed by Aspies who ask a lot of questions.
To a NT, it may seem that they are asking the same question over and over again.

But, I think this is related to the great depth that many Apies which to achieve in a particular area of study.



the_phoenix
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31 Jan 2017, 1:12 pm

BTDT wrote:
The big issue is that Aspies learn differently.
I think many people are annoyed by Aspies who ask a lot of questions.
To a NT, it may seem that they are asking the same question over and over again.

But, I think this is related to the great depth that many Apies which to achieve in a particular area of study.


Exactly.



idonthaveanickname
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31 Jan 2017, 2:26 pm

I still can't seem to learn about getting with a guy who likes me and immediately becoming involved with him. I always end up getting used, taken advantage of, lied to, stolen from, manipulated and abused. I read somewhere that not being able to learn from your mistakes is a trait of Borderline Personality Disorder, which I was diagnosed with in 2015. I'm not with anyone right now, and don't intend to. I'm in recovery from drugs and alcohol and need to focus on taking care of myself. I've also relapsed several times, even after almost dying from a heroin overdose. You'd think that would be a wake up call. But now I'm going to at least one AA or NA meeting every day and as long as I keep doing that, I shouldn't be at too great of a risk of relapsing.



whatamievendoing
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31 Jan 2017, 2:38 pm

Another one of these Aspie stereotype discussions, eh?

I for one have learned a lot in 22 years, but I will say that my learning methods haven't necessarily been normal. I'm a very practical dude, and I learn best through practical application instead of theory.


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ASPartOfMe
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31 Jan 2017, 4:11 pm

People make a lot of false assumptions about what people should know.


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hurtloam
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31 Jan 2017, 6:38 pm

Learn qhat exactly?

I have an example. Sometimes aspies find it hard to work out where the line is in social interaction. Just because it's true doesn't mean it's ok to say.

I've got this issue with an older friend. I can't understand how she's reached such a mature age, but still can't understand what will embarrass other people and why she shouldn't say it.

I used to be more like that when I was younger, but I realised that even though something is true, my words can be hurtful if I don't take the consequences into consideration.

I don't get why she can't understand that. I would hide certain posts from her on Facebook because I never knew if she'd participate tactfully or not. Eventually I just unfriended her because she just couldn't keep herself in check.



kraftiekortie
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31 Jan 2017, 6:41 pm

I don't know where you got this quite erroneous idea that Aspies can't learn!

Where did you get this information?

I'm glad us Aspies here are speaking out---and proving the folly of that assumption.

Or maybe this is sort of a "joke" thread? An ironic thread?



the_phoenix
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31 Jan 2017, 6:47 pm

kraftiekortie wrote:
I don't know where you got this quite erroneous idea that Aspies can't learn!

Where did you get this information?

I'm glad us Aspies here are speaking out---and proving the folly of that assumption.

Or maybe this is sort of a "joke" thread? An ironic thread?


Well, it's like this, kraftiekortie.

Some things I can learn well, other things I can't.
Actually it's more like, in some settings and environments I excel at learning, in others, I stink.

My IQ hovers near genius level.
I'm a Phi Beta Kappa.
And yet, I posted in another thread about how sometimes I can't follow directions people give me
because they speak too fast, or because my mind glosses over it ...
(because my learning style is different than that of most NTs).

So in a classroom setting, I shine.
Focusing on creative endeavors like art, I shine.

In more social settings, ... not so much.
Dealing with NT communication, not so much ... even when I tell myself I'll do better next time,
like Charlie Brown, Lucy, and the football.

Bottom Line:

Yes, Aspies can learn.
Basically, like everyone else in the world,
we have strengths and weaknesses.

...



the_phoenix
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31 Jan 2017, 6:49 pm

ASPartOfMe wrote:
People make a lot of false assumptions about what people should know.


True.



kraftiekortie
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31 Jan 2017, 6:49 pm

I know what you mean.

I've had quite a few Lucys in my life----and I've missed quite a few footballs, and fallen flat on my face.

It's a miracle I still have a nose! LOL



CockneyRebel
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31 Jan 2017, 10:24 pm

I'm able to learn. It's just that I think in pictures instead of paragraphs.


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