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Do LGBTQ people have more reasons to be proud than Aspies?
1) Yes 26%  26%  [ 9 ]
2) No 51%  51%  [ 18 ]
3) Not sure 23%  23%  [ 8 ]
Total votes : 35

League_Girl
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11 Mar 2017, 7:26 pm

Quote:
Imagine if someone told you you weren't Polish enough to be considered Polish?


I know this is off topic but I can't resist the urge to comment.

I have Native American in me but only the blood but I am not Native American so I have been told I am not one. That doesn't offend me. I have some English in me, German, Scottish, Hungarian, etc. and I don't get offended if I were told I wasn't English or Scottish or German because I didn't have enough. It's the same as telling someone they don't have autism because they don't have enough of the symptoms or are not impaired enough by it. But there are gray areas like they have symptoms but not enough for a true diagnoses but their impairments are significant enough so they still get the diagnoses for the help they need.


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Campin_Cat
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12 Mar 2017, 12:41 pm

Okay, now your posts are coming-across as angry, argumentative, combative, or something. I thought we were just having a conversation, here----an exchange of ideas / opinions----but, now it seems like you have some kind of agenda, or something; but, I'll go this round with you.....

Xardas and Campin_Cat wrote:
Campin_Cat wrote:
Yes, I have also known a couple of gay people, who later determined they were actually straight (we also have a non-Trans person on this site, who used to be Trans). IMO, that means they weren't gay, to-begin-with----that, maybe, because they were only able to communicate with / relate to their own gender, they misconstrued it to mean that they were gay, or something. I don't think there's a definitive answer----I have heard more-than-one person say that they felt sexuality was a spectrum, as well, and I can see how that could be.

IMO you are making up various circumstances to explain this (like the idea that they were only able to communicate with their own gender - you have no evidence that it was the case). For some reason you don't want to believe that sexuality can be fluid. I prefer to go with Occam's razor and to assume that they used to be gay but their sexuality has changed.

What circumstanceS----I only listed ONE, and I was giving you my OPINION; hence, the usuage of the terms, "maybe" and "or something"----and, your use of the term "making-up" seems to indicate that you think I was trying to deceive you; but, again, I'm only voicing my opinion (which is what, INITIALLY, you seemed to be requesting). I don't have any evidence----and, IMO, none was needed----because, IMO, it was clear I was only giving my opinion.

As for sexuality being fluid: I DID say that there are those who believe sexuality is on a spectrum, and that I can see how that could be. Again, you seem angry, or like you have an agenda----like, you've already got your mind made-up about what things, ARE, or whatever, and you're not willing to see it any other way / any other side, to it.

As for the simplest answer is often correct (Occam's razor): "Correct" is subjective, is it not! Who's to say YOU are correct----how 'bout, if NEITHER of us is wrong, and that we're just different / think differently!!


Campin_Cat wrote:
As for people "growing out of Autism", I don't think that's possible----to me that would seem like the same as someone just suddenly morphing into the opposite gender. I think what happens, is that people develop "tricks" / work-arounds / whatever, that make them APPEAR that they've grown-out of Autism (they could probably even be tested and found NOT to be Autistic), but that doesn't mean, IMO, that they're "over it", have been cured, or whatever.

Autism is a spectrum and IMO moving along the spectrum to become more NT-like is possible.

Sure, it's possible----I can be NT-like----but, I was responding to a very matter-of-fact statement of yours:

"There are also people who 'grow out of autism'."

IMO, there was nothing in that statement to indicate "I think", "IMO", "maybe", etc. I feel one can't make statements like that, and then get seemingly defensive with the person, who responded with all that they had to work-with (IOW, IF you were not meaning to sound that way, then I can't be expected to read your mind----especially, when there's only the written word, with no voice inflection or facial expression to be read).

Again, it's coming-across like you have an agenda. Did you come here, thinking we needed to be taught a lesson----and that YOU, above all others, could accomplish that. We've experienced many, MANY people like that, here, and they don't fare, well, here, cuz nobody likes unsolicited advice.


Question is where do you want to draw the line between being "already NT" and "still autistic".

I, personally, have nothing to do with where the line is drawn----only in regard to where I want to draw it, for ME, and I am in agreement with my Aspie diagnosis----but, if there was some kind of movement to campaign for changes, to help others, I might participate in something like that, depending on the catalyst, etc. (I feel I'm doing that, by participating in this thread with others).

Quote:
Yes, Aspies are OFTEN considered retards, when we display social awkwardness, or are slow on the uptake of jokes or sarcasm, or whatever (afterall, "retarded" DOES mean "slow"----and, I'm certainly aware of my being slow). As for us being smarter than NTs, I don't think that's true, either----again, I think we APPEAR to be smarter because one of our greatest passions seems to be learning (but, as I have said often, IMO, "learned" is NOT the same as being "smart").[/b]

OK but this refers to being "socially retarded" rather than being "intellectually retarded".

Yes, the examples I gave, were of being "socially retarded"----but, those were just the two that I thought-of, off the-top-of-my-head, and it would've been too long, to go-through the list of the many other things.

If someone is not slow on the uptake of jokes or sarcasm, can such a person still be autistic?

Yes, I feel that they can be----I feel I'M pretty good with those things----cuz, like you said, that's just the social part of it, and "the social part of it" is not the ONLY thing that "defines" (for lack of a better word) an Aspie.

Because I know a person who understands jokes and sarcasm pretty well, but she used to be labelled as an Aspie. Maybe she just "grew out of it"? Understanding jokes and sarcasm is not something that can be learned.

I don't believe a person can grow-out of it; IMO, they just "present", better----and, IMO, understanding jokes and sarcasm CAN be learned. There is an ENDLESS amount of threads on this site, asking "What does this mean" (a phrase or the way in which the phrase was used, for instance). I'm thinking the way a person is raised (and others to which they're exposed), and experiences they've had and whether or not they've grown (learned) from those experiences, etc., determines how / when / how quickly an Aspie picks-up on things. A prime example, IMO, is when someone comes to this site, who has never been exposed to British people / British English, and doesn't understand what the British person is trying to convey----then, after awhile, they DO learn; but, that doesn't mean they're no longer an Aspie.

Also, IMO, there is, like, "generic" sarcasm, and then there's "cultural sarcasm", and then there's "idiosyncratic sarcasm", and there's "current sarcasm" vs "old-school sarcasm", etc., etc., etc.----and, maybe NOBODY, then, has a natural knack, for ALL sarcasm; but, IMO, most of us Aspies are naturally more slower, with it.







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248RPA
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12 Mar 2017, 12:53 pm

Xardas, can you write a summary of what you know or have researched about Asperger's? (I know that writing everything you know about it will probably be too long.) It seems like your understanding of Asperger's is different from our understanding, and it is causing some miscommunication.


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AspieUtah
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12 Mar 2017, 1:25 pm

I am sorry if another user has already broached this idea. At the 2015 IMFAR International Meeting for Autism Research conference, more than one researcher presented studies which showed that about 10 percent of autists have "sexual and gender differences" while 10 percent of LGBT (mostly female-to-male transgender, but not exclusively) are autistic.

It would seem, then, that there is a connection between both segments of the overall population. When Aspies For Freedom was active, its leaders adopted many of the LGBT symbology (rainbow spectrum) and speech.

Therefore, why aren't both sides of this overlapping community building more bridges?


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Diagnosed in 2015 with ASD Level 1 by the University of Utah Health Care Autism Spectrum Disorder Clinic using the ADOS-2 Module 4 assessment instrument [11/30] -- Screened in 2014 with ASD by using the University of Cambridge Autism Research Centre AQ (Adult) [43/50]; EQ-60 for adults [11/80]; FQ [43/135]; SQ (Adult) [130/150] self-reported screening inventories -- Assessed since 1978 with an estimated IQ [≈145] by several clinicians -- Contact on WrongPlanet.net by private message (PM)


teksla
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12 Mar 2017, 3:17 pm

Although being gay (or other LGBT) is a part of your life, it doesn't change and shape everything you do. Being autistic shapes and changes everything we do, sometimes more, sometimes less.


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12 Mar 2017, 9:26 pm

I love the idea of an autistic pride march and I'd personally lead one dressed as Sgt. Schultz. I see it as a fun event where some people would be dressed up to celebrate, while others wear colours of the rainbow and hold Autistic Pride signs.


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PhosphorusDecree
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14 Mar 2017, 8:36 am

AspieUtah wrote:
I am sorry if another user has already broached this idea. At the 2015 IMFAR International Meeting for Autism Research conference, more than one researcher presented studies which showed that about 10 percent of autists have "sexual and gender differences" while 10 percent of LGBT (mostly female-to-male transgender, but not exclusively) are autistic.

It would seem, then, that there is a connection between both segments of the overall population. When Aspies For Freedom was active, its leaders adopted many of the LGBT symbology (rainbow spectrum) and speech.

Therefore, why aren't both sides of this overlapping community building more bridges?


I have always found LGBT people very accepting of my own differences- far less close-minded and judgemental than the general population. For a long time, the majority of my friends were gay or lesbian, and I'm still a bit wary of other straight men.


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AspieUtah
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14 Mar 2017, 8:45 am

PhosphorusDecree wrote:
AspieUtah wrote:
I am sorry if another user has already broached this idea. At the 2015 IMFAR International Meeting for Autism Research conference, more than one researcher presented studies which showed that about 10 percent of autists have "sexual and gender differences" while 10 percent of LGBT (mostly female-to-male transgender, but not exclusively) are autistic.

It would seem, then, that there is a connection between both segments of the overall population. When Aspies For Freedom was active, its leaders adopted many of the LGBT symbology (rainbow spectrum) and speech.

Therefore, why aren't both sides of this overlapping community building more bridges?

I have always found LGBT people very accepting of my own differences- far less close-minded and judgemental than the general population. For a long time, the majority of my friends were gay or lesbian, and I'm still a bit wary of other straight men.

Yep. Go Leeds Rhinos! :)


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Diagnosed in 2015 with ASD Level 1 by the University of Utah Health Care Autism Spectrum Disorder Clinic using the ADOS-2 Module 4 assessment instrument [11/30] -- Screened in 2014 with ASD by using the University of Cambridge Autism Research Centre AQ (Adult) [43/50]; EQ-60 for adults [11/80]; FQ [43/135]; SQ (Adult) [130/150] self-reported screening inventories -- Assessed since 1978 with an estimated IQ [≈145] by several clinicians -- Contact on WrongPlanet.net by private message (PM)