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ASPartOfMe
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29 Apr 2019, 10:09 am

Darmok wrote:
It's a lot like the old USSR, where nobody could get a job unless they were members of the Communist Party, and anyone who wasn't a Party member was socially marginalized.


Secular universities now demand a ‘profession of faith’

Many religious universities have historically used “statements of faith” to uphold their religious mission. But while such policies are on the wane, a different sort of religious statement is increasingly common at secular colleges — namely, the statement of diversity.

Professors and other faculty members are asked to pledge their commitment to “equity” and “inclusion” and to demonstrate how they have acted to fulfill this pledge in the past. And much as with the religious version, the goal of these policies is to ensure uniformity of belief.

Consider the University of California, Los Angeles. To be considered for tenure-track positions, applicants are required to write a full statement outlining their commitment to diversity. According to UCLA guidelines, the extent to which a professor promotes equity, diversity and inclusion is a key factor in making progress on the tenure track.

Promoting these ideals “is inseparable from how the University of California conceives of ‘merit,’ ” the school says. UC Riverside, UC San Diego and UC Berkeley all require similar diversity statements.

At Vassar, tenure-track candidates have to report their “contributions to social justice.” Applicants at the University of Minnesota-Duluth must “demonstrate ability to support the university’s commitment to equity and diversity.” Vanderbilt, the University of Pennsylvania, the University of Washington and the University of Nebraska all instruct their professors on how to write ­effective diversity statements.

Many schools have instituted other systems to promote the latest woke ideologies. At Villanova University, a new policy asks students to rate their teachers on whether they have demonstrated “cultural awareness” and created an “environment free of bias based on individual differences or social identities.”

Faculty at Harvard’s School of Engineering and Applied Sciences were recently required to submit reports detailing their actions in support of “diversity, inclusion and belonging.” Teachers’ ability to demonstrate wokeness will affect the assignment of future bonuses, per the school’s dean.


https://nypost.com/2019/04/26/secular-u ... -of-faith/

Communism is the basis or root ideology of the regressive left.


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29 Apr 2019, 8:54 pm

Image


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29 Apr 2019, 9:36 pm

Darmok wrote:
Image


:lmao:


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30 Apr 2019, 8:09 am

Only one of my professors in college (that I know of) was conservative. He was quite religious - a Gideonite, I think. Once when I was there, he was standing on school grounds passing out bibles. It made the other professors cranky. I think that he probably shouldn’t have been allowed to do that because it could’ve made his non-Christian students uncomfortable and pressured. It was a public college, so he was probably breaking some rule. He was a nice guy, though, so I didn’t mind his behavior as much as I normally would have.

This experience isn’t really relevant to the discussion, but I thought it was interesting at the time. Most of the professors I’ve had have been fairly moderate in their views and were respectful of people who were more conservative. Then again, my area was pretty conservative overall so that may have been part of it.



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30 Apr 2019, 12:50 pm

Nice guy.

Prof with history of anti-white comments now says 'whiteness is terrorism'

A Trinity College professor is in hot water after tweeting “whiteness is terrorism."

Professor of Sociology Johnny Eric Williams followed that tweet with another saying, “all self-identified white people (no exceptions) are invested in and collude with systematic white racism/white supremacy.”

The professor has since made his account private but the tweets can be seen on The Hartford Courant.

Williams also called out former President and First Lady Barack and Michelle Obama. According to the Hartford Courant, he said, “I’m referring to [Turning Point USA leader Candace Owens'] other and less brazen but more insidious dangerous ‘white’ kneegrows like Barry and Michelle Obama and many other white kneegrows you encounter daily.”


https://www.campusreform.org/?ID=12163


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30 Apr 2019, 7:03 pm

Darmok wrote:
Nice guy.

Prof with history of anti-white comments now says 'whiteness is terrorism'

A Trinity College professor is in hot water after tweeting “whiteness is terrorism."

Professor of Sociology Johnny Eric Williams followed that tweet with another saying, “all self-identified white people (no exceptions) are invested in and collude with systematic white racism/white supremacy.”

The professor has since made his account private but the tweets can be seen on The Hartford Courant.

Williams also called out former President and First Lady Barack and Michelle Obama. According to the Hartford Courant, he said, “I’m referring to [Turning Point USA leader Candace Owens'] other and less brazen but more insidious dangerous ‘white’ kneegrows like Barry and Michelle Obama and many other white kneegrows you encounter daily.”


https://www.campusreform.org/?ID=12163


It sounds like he has anger management issues...
Perhaps he should seek counselling...


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I'm a thinker. Some think I'm a stinker. Pepe le Pew. ;)
Down with big business!...
I'm not here to change the world...There isn't a big enough soiled nappy bin... ;)
Autistic/scout motto: "Give me a better argument and I will listen..."
"Honesty is not a social duty, not a sacrifice for the sake of others, but the most profoundly selfish virtue man can practice: his refusal to sacrifice the reality of his own existence to the deluded consciousness of others."
Truth may be inconvenient but it is never politically incorrect...The Oracle of Truth has spoken...8) I'm a rationalist...Deal with it...:mrgreen:


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06 May 2019, 9:12 am

Radical leftists have intensified their campaigns to suppress free speech so much that state legislatures are starting to act to protect free speech on college and university campuses.

ROUNDUP: The free speech stories this week you may have missed

It was quite a week when it comes to free speech on college campuses. Campus Reform covered six incidents in five states where conservative individuals or groups faced censorship or disruption while exercising their First Amendment rights to free speech.

The multiple incidents occurred as two Oklahoma's governor signed into law a campus free speech bill, and the Texas legislature inched closer to sending a campus free speech bill to its governor's desk. If Texas Gov. Greg Abbott signs a campus free speech bill into law, which he has said he will, the Lone Star State would become the 13th state to have passed campus free speech legislation. Fifteen other states have introduced, but not passed, campus free speech legislation.

Here's a map and brief roundup of the stories you may have missed: (available at the link)


https://www.campusreform.org/?ID=12192


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23 May 2019, 10:51 pm

From the Department of Advanced Studies in Democratic Intersectionality ... which teaches us that the gay Democrat running for president is actually straight.

Not sure whether to file this one under leftist academia, politics, or comedy. :mrgreen:


Yale women’s studies professor: Gay white men are symbols of heterosexuality

Democratic presidential candidate Pete Buttigieg and his husband Chasten offer a “vision of heterosexuality without straight people,” according to commentary by a Yale University assistant professor in Women’s, Gender and Sexuality Studies responding to the politician’s recent image on the cover of TIME magazine.

On the Los Angeles Review of Books website, Professor Greta LaFleur argues the photo is a symbol of heteronormativity:

“At first glance, one sees the anonymity of Norman Rockwell’s mid-century America: the house-unparticular porch, the timelessness of the couple form.... This photo also tells a profound story about whiteness, above and beyond the fact that almost everything in this photo is, itself, white. It’s such an all-consuming aesthetic, here, that it practically resists interpretation; like the generically familiar (to me, a white person) porch, the cover photo claims that there’s nothing to see, because we already know what it is. We have seen this image, we know this couple, “we” should be comfortable.”

After an extensive passage in which LaFleur argues “whiteness can be and regularly is weaponized by white people,” LaFleur goes on to suggest that Pete and Chasten may not actually be gay:

"If certain forms of structural power such as whiteness have become detachable from white people, perhaps this is true of other forms of structural power as well. This is not to make a “like race” argument (although this is of course such a problematic staple of so much theorizing in sexuality studies) so much as it is to make a “like power” argument; and the argument I am making, of course, is that this photo is about a lot of things, but one of its defining features is its heterosexuality. It’s offering us the promise that our first gay first family might actually be a straight one."


https://www.thecollegefix.com/yale-wome ... sexuality/


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23 May 2019, 11:29 pm

Segregation Is Thriving on the Left - Going Backwards

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A new study by the National Association of Scholars has some alarming news about race relations at American colleges. A massive number of schools have institutionalized racial segregation across vast swaths of campus life: “About 46 percent (80 colleges out of 173 surveyed) segregate student orientation programs; 43 percent (75 colleges out of the total) offer segregated residential arrangements; and 72 percent (125 colleges out of the total) segregate graduation ceremonies.”

From orientation to graduation, many students are living out their entire college careers in racially determined enclaves. The report’s main authors, Dion J. Pierre and Peter W. Wood, have dubbed this phenomenon “neo-segregation,” and they explain how it evolved over decades after an initial “good-faith effort to achieve racial integration” in the early 1960s.

To overcome the shortage of black students who were prepared for elite academic programs,” they write, “universities such as Yale began to admit substantial numbers of under-qualified black students.” They continue: “More than a third of these students dropped out in the first year and those who remained were often embittered by the experience. They turned to each other for support and found inspiration in black nationalism. What emerged by the late sixties were radical and sometimes militant black groups on campus, rejecting the ideal of racial integration and voicing a new separatist ethic.”

Then, the universities themselves got in on the act: “On campus after campus, black separatists won concessions from administrators who were afraid of further alienating blacks,” they write. “The old integrationist ideal has been sacrificed almost entirely. Instead of offering opportunities for students to mix freely with students of dissimilar backgrounds, colleges promote ethnic enclaves, stoke racial resentment, and build organizational structures on the basis of group grievance.”

This history is compelling. But what’s most distressing is where this is all heading—and why. Segregation is likely to increase on colleges campuses (these are my thoughts, not those of the study’s authors) because it’s the only possible end product of today’s activist left. Specifically, the proliferation of safe spaces and the dominance of identity politics (core aspects of the campus-leftist agenda) must end in segregation. Safe spaces are created by separating out unwanted elements. Identity politics, by definition, emphasizes group differences over similarities. Inevitably, when you have the two enjoined in an unholy alliance on campuses across the country, you’re going to get the separation of people according to their group differences.

Not that long ago, informal segregation on college campuses was thought of as shameful evidence of failure. It was, therefore, largely ignored—but not encouraged. In The Closing of the American Mind (1987), Allan Bloom wrote: “The programmatic brotherhood of the sixties did not culminate in integration but veered off toward black separation. White students feel uncomfortable about this and do not like to talk about it. This is not the way things are supposed to be.” Today, as the NAS study makes plain, separation—along lines of race, gender, and sexual preference—is seen as a multiculturalist achievement.

Pierre and Wood are perceptive about the damage being done:

"The most readily apparent harm from such segregation is that it fosters a sense of insecurity. The members of the segregated group are taught to fear other groups, especially white students. They are encouraged to see themselves as victims or potential victims, and as heirs to past grievances. Training students to see themselves as vulnerable to the transgressions of a larger, intolerant, or bigoted community is poor preparation for life in American society."

It is a fundamental feature of radical movements that they harm most those they claim to be helping. The identitarians and safe-space champions are no exception. They’re steadily institutionalizing a program of segregation that will undermine the education of generations and set the country back decades.


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26 May 2019, 6:02 pm

Teachers allegedly told to favor black students in ‘racial equity’ training

Quote:
In controversial “implicit bias” training, New York City’s public-school educators have been told to focus on black children over white ones — and one Jewish superintendent who described her family’s Holocaust tragedies was scolded and humiliated, according to firsthand accounts.

A consultant hired by the city Department of Education told administrators at a workshop that “racial equity” means favoring black children regardless of their socio-economic status, sources said.

“If I had a poor white male student and I had a middle-class black boy, I would actually put my equitable strategies and interventions into that middle class black boy because over the course of his lifetime he will have less access and less opportunities than that poor white boy,” the consultant, Darnisa Amante, is quoted as saying by those in the room.

“That’s what racial equity is,” Amante explained.

DOE spokesman Will Mantell would not say whether Chancellor Richard Carranza supports Amante’s statement about favoring black children.

“Anti-bias and equity trainings are about creating high expectations and improving outcomes for all of our students,” Mantell said in a statement. “These trainings are used across the country because they help kids, and out-of-context quotes and anonymous allegations just distract from this important work.”

The DOE’s anti-bias training — a $23 million mandatory program for all DOE employees — has irked some administrators, teachers and parents who contend parts are ugly and divisive.

Four white female DOE executives demoted under Carranza’s new regime plan to sue the city for racial discrimination, claiming whiteness has become “toxic,” The Post revealed last week.

At a monthly superintendents meeting in the spring of 2018, shortly after Carranza’s arrival, members were asked to share answers to the question: “What lived experience inspires you as a leader to fight for equity?”

One Jewish superintendent shared stories about her grandmother Malka who told of bombs falling in Lodz, Poland, and running from the Nazis in the wee hours by packing up her four children and hiding in the forest, and her grandfather Naftali, who spent nearly six years in a labor and concentration camp, where he witnessed the brutal execution of his mother and sister.

“My grandparents taught me to understand the dangers of ‘targeted racism’ or the exclusion of any group, and the importance of equity for all people. This is my core value as an educator,” the superintendent told colleagues.

“At the break, I stood up and, to my surprise, I was verbally attacked by a black superintendent in front of my colleagues. She said ‘This is not about being Jewish! It’s about black and brown boys of color only. You better check yourself.’”

“I was traumatized,” the Jewish educator said. “ It was like 1939 all over again. I couldn’t believe this could happen to me in NYC!”

However, two other superintendents — one black and one Dominican — defended the Holocaust comments as valid and vouched for their colleague as one who fights to level the playing field for all students.

In Manhattan, a middle-school teacher with her own kids in public schools, said the DOE training “is a catalyst for hate and division.”

“I have colleagues who won’t participate during ‘Courageous Conversations’ (the DOE protocol for implicit-bias workshops) because they don’t feel safe.”

She cringes at training phrases like “replacement thinking” and the disdain for “whiteness.”

“My ancestors were enslaved and murdered because of their religion, I am now being forced to become ‘liberated’ from my whiteness. I am being persecuted because of the circumstances of my birth. I was not aware that I needed to be liberated from how God created me.”

Despite Carranza’s contention that those who complain about the training need it the most, she said, “I will never be brainwashed by Richard Carranza and his minions. I cannot support a schools chancellor who is implicitly biased against me and my children.”

Emboldened by his support, some of Carranza’s top managers openly use the expression “disrupt and dismantle” as a new battle cry for equity.

In her training session in February 2019, consultant Amante told DOE higher-ups to face the fact that issues of race, power and privilege will rise to the forefront and shake things up.

“Through this process of moving towards racial equity, we will have to pull layers back on who we are. You are going to have to talk about your power and your privilege. You will need to name your privilege,” Amante is quoted as saying.

She also warned that jobs in the new climate may be shaky.

“You are going to have to acknowledge that you will have to step back. You might fear losing your job. When we get to true racial equity you will have to define new institutional policies. This might feel dangerous because you are going to have to talk about race daily.”

Amante, a lecturer at Harvard University Graduate School of Education, is CEO of Disruptive Equity Education Project, or DEEP, a group aimed at “dismantling systemic oppression and racism,” it says. She did not respond to emails seeking comment.

The DOE’s Office of Equity and Access has contracted DEEP for $175,000. Another anti-bias consultant, Glenn Singleton, the author of “Courageous Conversations,” which includes a critique of the “white supremacy culture,” has a $775,000 contract.

Some parent leaders support Carranza’s campaign.

“We agree with the chancellor that those who do not see the value in this work are the ones who must look inward harder,” said Shino Tanikawa, a parent in Manhattan’s District 2 and member of Mayor de Blasio’s School Diversity Advisory Group.

“This work requires everyone, including people of color, to look inward and confront prejudices we all harbor. For some of us, this work also requires us to acknowledge the privilege bestowed upon us by the power structure. It creates a great deal of discomfort but that is the nature of the work. Disrupting the system is difficult and sometimes painful.”


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29 May 2019, 6:43 pm

ASPartOfMe wrote:
Teachers allegedly told to favor black students in ‘racial equity’ training
Quote:
In controversial “implicit bias” training, New York City’s public-school educators have been told to focus on black children over white ones — and one Jewish superintendent who described her family’s Holocaust tragedies was scolded and humiliated, according to firsthand accounts.

A consultant hired by the city Department of Education told administrators at a workshop that “racial equity” means favoring black children regardless of their socio-economic status, sources said.

“If I had a poor white male student and I had a middle-class black boy, I would actually put my equitable strategies and interventions into that middle class black boy because over the course of his lifetime he will have less access and less opportunities than that poor white boy,” the consultant, Darnisa Amante, is quoted as saying by those in the room.

“That’s what racial equity is,” Amante explained.

DOE spokesman Will Mantell would not say whether Chancellor Richard Carranza supports Amante’s statement about favoring black children.

“Anti-bias and equity trainings are about creating high expectations and improving outcomes for all of our students,” Mantell said in a statement. “These trainings are used across the country because they help kids, and out-of-context quotes and anonymous allegations just distract from this important work.”

The DOE’s anti-bias training — a $23 million mandatory program for all DOE employees — has irked some administrators, teachers and parents who contend parts are ugly and divisive.

Four white female DOE executives demoted under Carranza’s new regime plan to sue the city for racial discrimination, claiming whiteness has become “toxic,” The Post revealed last week.

At a monthly superintendents meeting in the spring of 2018, shortly after Carranza’s arrival, members were asked to share answers to the question: “What lived experience inspires you as a leader to fight for equity?”

One Jewish superintendent shared stories about her grandmother Malka who told of bombs falling in Lodz, Poland, and running from the Nazis in the wee hours by packing up her four children and hiding in the forest, and her grandfather Naftali, who spent nearly six years in a labor and concentration camp, where he witnessed the brutal execution of his mother and sister.

“My grandparents taught me to understand the dangers of ‘targeted racism’ or the exclusion of any group, and the importance of equity for all people. This is my core value as an educator,” the superintendent told colleagues.

“At the break, I stood up and, to my surprise, I was verbally attacked by a black superintendent in front of my colleagues. She said ‘This is not about being Jewish! It’s about black and brown boys of color only. You better check yourself.’”

“I was traumatized,” the Jewish educator said. “ It was like 1939 all over again. I couldn’t believe this could happen to me in NYC!”

However, two other superintendents — one black and one Dominican — defended the Holocaust comments as valid and vouched for their colleague as one who fights to level the playing field for all students.

In Manhattan, a middle-school teacher with her own kids in public schools, said the DOE training “is a catalyst for hate and division.”

“I have colleagues who won’t participate during ‘Courageous Conversations’ (the DOE protocol for implicit-bias workshops) because they don’t feel safe.”

She cringes at training phrases like “replacement thinking” and the disdain for “whiteness.”

“My ancestors were enslaved and murdered because of their religion, I am now being forced to become ‘liberated’ from my whiteness. I am being persecuted because of the circumstances of my birth. I was not aware that I needed to be liberated from how God created me.”

Despite Carranza’s contention that those who complain about the training need it the most, she said, “I will never be brainwashed by Richard Carranza and his minions. I cannot support a schools chancellor who is implicitly biased against me and my children.”

Emboldened by his support, some of Carranza’s top managers openly use the expression “disrupt and dismantle” as a new battle cry for equity.

In her training session in February 2019, consultant Amante told DOE higher-ups to face the fact that issues of race, power and privilege will rise to the forefront and shake things up.

“Through this process of moving towards racial equity, we will have to pull layers back on who we are. You are going to have to talk about your power and your privilege. You will need to name your privilege,” Amante is quoted as saying.

She also warned that jobs in the new climate may be shaky.

“You are going to have to acknowledge that you will have to step back. You might fear losing your job. When we get to true racial equity you will have to define new institutional policies. This might feel dangerous because you are going to have to talk about race daily.”

Amante, a lecturer at Harvard University Graduate School of Education, is CEO of Disruptive Equity Education Project, or DEEP, a group aimed at “dismantling systemic oppression and racism,” it says. She did not respond to emails seeking comment.

The DOE’s Office of Equity and Access has contracted DEEP for $175,000. Another anti-bias consultant, Glenn Singleton, the author of “Courageous Conversations,” which includes a critique of the “white supremacy culture,” has a $775,000 contract.

Some parent leaders support Carranza’s campaign.

“We agree with the chancellor that those who do not see the value in this work are the ones who must look inward harder,” said Shino Tanikawa, a parent in Manhattan’s District 2 and member of Mayor de Blasio’s School Diversity Advisory Group.

“This work requires everyone, including people of color, to look inward and confront prejudices we all harbor. For some of us, this work also requires us to acknowledge the privilege bestowed upon us by the power structure. It creates a great deal of discomfort but that is the nature of the work. Disrupting the system is difficult and sometimes painful.”

Bombshell suit claims Carranza’s ‘toxic’ whiteness purge cost DOE execs their jobs
Quote:
Schools Chancellor Richard Carranza’s crusade against “toxic” whiteness at the city Department of Education created an “Us vs. Them’’ culture that saw three longtime officials demoted in favor of less-qualified persons of color, a blockbuster $90 million lawsuit claims.

“If you draw a paycheck from DOE … get on board with my equity platform or leave,” Carranza thundered to employees assembled in the rotunda of the agency’s Lower Manhattan headquarters last June, according to the suit, filed Tuesday in state supreme court.

That “totalitarian threat” was just the most direct example of Carranza’s push to overhaul the leadership at the top and attitude throughout the DOE since he took the helm last year, claims the suit, levied against the department and Carranza by the trio of demoted white female executives.

“Under Carranza’s leadership, DOE has swiftly and irrevocably silenced, sidelined and punished plaintiffs and other Caucasian female DOE employees on the basis of their race, gender and unwillingness to accept their other colleagues’ hateful stereotypes about them,” wrote the group’s lawyer, Davida S. Perry, in the filing.

Plaintiff Lois Herrera, who started at the DOE in 1986 as a guidance counselor and worked her way up to lead its Office of Safety and Youth Development, claims in the suit that she saw a sea change almost immediately after Mayor Bill de Blasio appointed Carranza in April 2018.

A month later, LaShawn Robinson, then the executive director of the DOE’s Office of Equity and Access, purportedly told white attendees of a training seminar that they “had to take a step back and yield to colleagues of color” and “recognize that values of white culture are supremacist,” Herrera heard from a fellow administrator, according to the suit.

At another scheduled event, in August, Herrera saw Robinson’s alleged attitude for herself.

“If you’ve been with the DOE for more than 20 years, you are responsible for the problem,” Robinson, who is black, allegedly said.

Despite being Harvard-educated and having been recognized as recently as 2017 for contributing to the “safest year on record” in city schools, Herrera was abruptly stripped of her title and demoted three levels “to essentially the bottom of the … group she formerly led,” the suit says.

Without so much as a formal search or interview process, Herrera was replaced by an African American man, Mark Rampersant, despite him being “demonstrably less qualified,” the suit claims.

Herrera said she was “required” to attend Rampersant’s promotion ceremony. Her repeated requests for a new workstation were met with her belongings being stuffed into boxes and stashed under a headquarters stairwell before she was ultimately transferred to the Bronx.

The Department of Education responded to The Post on Tuesday with the exact statement it gave two weeks ago when asked about the race issue.

“We hire the right people to get the job done for kids and families, and these claims of ‘reverse racism’ have no basis in fact,’ ’’ the department repeated.


Richard Carranza denies white execs demoted based on race
Quote:
City Schools Chancellor Richard Carranza on Wednesday refused to directly address claims of anti-white discrimination outlined in a $90 million lawsuit by three Department of Education executives, but insisted the allegations are “absolutely not true.”

“We have the truth on our side, so allegations can be made,” said Carranza, when asked Wednesday about the suit at a Bronx event announcing the availability of free summer meals for city kids. “It’s absolutely not true.”

Carranza insisted Wednesday that the sweeping leadership changes he instituted shortly after joining the agency in April 2018 were about finding the right people for the job, but that his qualifications had nothing to do with race.

Carranza also denied ever telling officials assembled in the rotunda of DOE’s Lower Manhattan headquarters to “get on board with my equity platform or leave,” another claim made in the suit.

“What I will say is that if you look at the data, if you look at who are the students that are performing well and who are not performing well, it is undeniable and without question that there are certain groups of students … that have not been served well by public school systems,” said Carranza on Wednesday. “That’s what this is really abou


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04 Jun 2019, 11:17 pm

Yes, there is. :mrgreen:


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Truth may be inconvenient but it is never politically incorrect...The Oracle of Truth has spoken...8) I'm a rationalist...Deal with it...:mrgreen:


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07 Jun 2019, 9:39 am

Georgetown officials silent on whether they will implement slavery reparations fee

WASHINGTON, D.C. — Georgetown University officials are staying silent for now on whether they will implement a student fee to benefit the descendants of slaves sold by the university in the 1830s.

In April, a majority of students voted to approve a referendum calling for the creation of a $27.20 per student semesterly fee in honor of the 272 people sold by Georgetown. The measure stated the fee would begin to be collected in the fall of 2020.


https://www.thecollegefix.com/georgetow ... tions-fee/


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Posts: 62,486
Location: Queens, NYC

07 Jun 2019, 9:44 am

Descendants should not have to pay for the debts of their ancestors.

That was one of the main points of the founding of our nations, actually.

I would disagree with such a "fee."



Darmok
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Joined: 18 Dec 2015
Gender: Male
Posts: 8,915
Location: New England

08 Jun 2019, 6:15 pm

"1984" was supposed to be a warning, not an instruction manual.


Academics ignore the anniversary of 1984 because they know they’re living it out

Seventy years ago today, George Orwell published 1984, a now-famous novel about a dystopian future in which totalitarianism is a universal political truth and free thought is eliminated in the name of peace and solidarity. Modern academics, especially scholars in the humanities, have long sung the books’ praises, but the academy has been suspiciously quiet during the buildup to this most recent anniversary.

Why is the anniversary of 1984 being ignored? Perhaps because the same educators that once used the book to teach the dangers of totalitarianism and censorship have become the very Orwellian monsters they fought against.

Academia has increasingly begun to emulate Orwell’s thought police. Dissenting voices are not engaged, but shouted down. Colleges are pressured to fire professors for conveying views deemed less than liberal. In particular, the humanities have become a collective Big Brother in academia and, by extension, other leftist spaces.


https://www.washingtonexaminer.com/red- ... ing-it-out


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