Judith Gould - Diagnostic differences for women & girls

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Amity
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10 Apr 2017, 11:27 am

A good powerpoint on the diagnostic differences for women and girls on the autism spectrum.
Slideshare ppt



broccolichowder
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12 Apr 2017, 12:29 am

Thank you for the resource. It was interesting to read, and I hope that research on autistic women continue. But I have to ask who the woman is. It makes me a little apprehensive about how qualified someone is if they can't create a professional-looking powerpoint. (Not that it was bad - it just didn't appear to be edited, there was too much information on slides, etc.)


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12 Apr 2017, 2:54 am

broccolichowder wrote:
But I have to ask who the woman is.

A person that has a lot to do with our current understanding of autism.

National Autistic Society
Quote:

Judith Gould, is the Lead Consultant at the Lorna Wing Centre for Autism and retired as Director of the Centre in 2015. She is a Chartered Consultant Clinical Psychologist, with over 40 years experience, specialising in autism spectrum disorders and learning disabilities.

Before being the Director of The Lorna Wing Centre she worked as a member of the scientific staff of the Medical Research Council Social Psychiatry Unit and was a Senior Lecturer at the Institute of Psychiatry, University of London. She has also worked as a Clinical Psychologist within both health and social services. She has published widely in the field of autism spectrum disorders. Her current interest is the diagnosis of women and girls in the spectrum.

Lorna Wing and Judith Gould’s early work in the 1970s on the epidemiology of autism and related conditions, led to the concept of a spectrum of autistic conditions.

Judith Gould together with Lorna Wing set up The Centre for Social and Communication Disorders, (now the Lorna Wing Centre for Autism) which was the first service in the UK to provide a complete diagnostic, assessment and advice service for children, adolescents and adults with social and communication disorders.

In addition to setting up the Centre as a model for diagnosing autism spectrum disorders the Centre’s team offers training to professionals in their methods of diagnosis and assessment of needs. Lorna Wing and Judith Gould developed an interview schedule called the Diagnostic Interview for Social and Communication Disorders (DISCO) to be used as part of the diagnostic process. This schedule enables the professional to use a dimensional approach when making a diagnosis which is more helpful than diagnostic sub-grouping when planning treatment, education and care. This approach bests fits the new DSM 5 Diagnostic Classification System. The DISCO is widely used throughout the UK and overseas and training in its use is carried out both at the Centre and internationally.


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Amity
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12 Apr 2017, 10:32 am

Yes indeed, thanks ASPartOfMe. ...perhaps she is better known in U.K. circles. I think this type of information helps when interpreting the diagnostic criteria for women.
Maybe a video of her discussing the topic would be more digestible than the PowerPoint :) Judith Gould Diagnostic differences video



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17 Apr 2017, 3:40 am

Quote:
They are often over-eager which can lead to social rejection


I relate to this and have seen it in my female aspie friends. We try too hard to be friends and that's off putting to NTS. Or we are over enthusiastic about what we are interested in which is too intense for NT girls to handle.

Quote:
Females generally have superior linguistic abilities to males of a smiliar cognitive level

I find this interesting. I wonder if it's why aspie women aren't really attracted to aspie men. We can communicate better and trying to communicate with a man who doesn't have linguistic abilities of the same level isn't satisfying (although I find this with most man and women anyway when I talk to them)

I'm more stereotypically male in my obsessions and interests though. I like technical things and trains and computers and sci-fi. My interests are not similar to those of other girls and my aspie female friends tend to be similar to me. They are interested in medicine and science and history. Only one aspie female I know is obsessed with celebrities.

Quote:
angry/confused when things are not how they are supposed to be according to the learned rules
This definately applies to me and my friends. It's a thing we've bonded over. We were very confused as teenagers and just thought that NTs were bad people. I feel like it's taken me a long time to see the world in colour rather than in black and white. This black and white way of being got one of my friends fired (actually she was made redundant which is legal, but in reality they pushed her out because they didn't like her).

Most of my female aspie friends have anxiety, depression or chronic fatigue/fibromyalgia.

Slide 22 about fear is something I relate to. I am always stressed. I find it hard to understand what is expected of me and whether what I do is actually good enough at work, in all of the jobs I've had.


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20 Apr 2017, 4:38 pm

Hurtloam wrote:
Slide 22 about fear is something I relate to. I am always stressed. I find it hard to understand what is expected of me and whether what I do is actually good enough at work, in all of the jobs I've had.

Quote:
One view from a women with Asperger Syndrome
Fear is the core emotional trait, fear triggers unpredictable anxiety
Reason for fear:
•Sustained and untreatable inability to connect, understand and work out situations and people
•The not knowing, the inability to reach for their own feelings or to verbalise things and being unable to understand what is expected of them
•Not being able to work out a sequence of events or to predict people or situations
•The inability to know when they can trust people
•The paralysing fear can fully control them and internally disorganise them to the extent that it becomes easier to disconnect from their surroundings Sofia Lake – ‘A constant feeling of not knowing’ 2014, Author House The Lorna Wing Centre 2016


I relate to the slide about fear too, the constant unknown, trying to make sense of people/situations and having to be on guard uses up more energy than I would like it to.