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beneficii
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11 Apr 2017, 2:55 pm

Türkçe öğreniyorum.

Because I know Japanese, I can kinda get the grammar. Through iTalki, I've talked to teachers via Skype. It's very challenging adjusting to a new language!


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Last edited by beneficii on 11 Apr 2017, 7:26 pm, edited 1 time in total.

dossa
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11 Apr 2017, 6:22 pm

That is delightful. While I am not a person who can speak any language beyond English, I completely tip my hat to anyone who goes out and learns another one (or more). Kudos to you.


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naturalplastic
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12 Apr 2017, 8:56 pm

Yes. Praise from me as well.

Sabe uno pocquito de Espanol.From highschool. And Spanish is a European language, Indoeuropean, with a lot cognants to English. So its actually rather facil.

Turkish must be interesting, but also must be hard to learn because it is not an Indoeuropean language.

I volunteer at a public access TV/radio station. And was invited to a live "Altaic languages" panel TV show with folks from Turkey, and wherever (Uzbekistan?).Sounded fun and interesting. Couldnt make it to station the day of the event though.

BTW, are you saying that Turkish has a similar grammer to Japanese? Some linguists have suggested a kinship between Japanese and the Altaic languages like Turkish and Mongolian.



beneficii
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16 Apr 2017, 12:21 am

Yes. Like Japanese, Turkish is agglutinative, and any word or phrase that modifies another always comes before the modified word, except for predicates. And both follow subject-object-verb word order. A lot of the Turkish noun case suffixes sorta resemble their Japanese counterparts (though in Japanese they are particles, not suffixes), but the vocabulary is very different from Japanese. There are of course still differences in grammar.

An agglutinative language is one where you can mix and match multiple prefixes or suffixes.

One of my teachers has credited my prior knowledge of Japanese with helping me learn Turkish grammar faster.


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