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AspieUtah
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26 Jul 2017, 7:02 am

KSL.com wrote:
Duchesne mom sues sheriff after her autistic son, 13, was thrown to ground

By Annie Knox | Posted Jul 25th, 2017 @ 9:04pm

SALT LAKE CITY — An officer responding to a report of a suspicious Hispanic or Asian man at a Duchesne County convenience store said he came across a teen at a nearby library who ran away from him.

So the sheriff's sergeant forced the autistic boy to the ground, handcuffed him and drove the 13-year-old back to his mom's house, police bodycam footage released Tuesday shows....

https://www.ksl.com/?sid=45166693

In a state where autism is really, REALLY, understood and supported, this report is disturbing. It seems that some Utahns still don't appreciate the temperament of local "grizzly moms" when their children are mistreated.

An earlier news report published by The Salt Lake Tribune ( http://www.sltrib.com/news/5505908-155/ ... ffs-office ), included more details.


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Diagnosed in 2015 with ASD Level 1 by the University of Utah Health Care Autism Spectrum Disorder Clinic using the ADOS-2 Module 4 assessment instrument [11/30] -- Screened in 2014 with ASD by using the University of Cambridge Autism Research Centre AQ (Adult) [43/50]; EQ-60 for adults [11/80]; FQ [43/135]; SQ (Adult) [130/150] self-reported screening inventories -- Assessed since 1978 with an estimated IQ [≈145] by several clinicians -- Contact on WrongPlanet.net by private message (PM)


ASPartOfMe
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26 Jul 2017, 8:35 am

This seems more about the boys ethnicity then his autistic traits or autism.

Curfew for school age kids during the school hours is another problem. Another example of school districts panning off thier responsibilities to law enforcement. What if the kid was sent home because he had a tummy ache?


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Aristophanes
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26 Jul 2017, 9:13 am

ASPartOfMe wrote:
This seems more about the boys ethnicity then his autistic traits or autism.

Curfew for school age kids during the school hours is another problem. Another example of school districts panning off thier responsibilities to law enforcement. What if the kid was sent home because he had a tummy ache?

That's how the article frames it, but we can't know the police officer's thinking and thus it's debatable. He's Hispanic and autistic, two characteristics that stick out like a sore thumb in a white socially conservative area. Unfortunately because of that he was virtually guaranteed to have interactions with police at some point or another. This is entirely why courts reject 'suspicious behavior' as probable cause, what's suspicious to one person is completely normal to another. Also of note, the family isn't suing the PD over racial profiling, rather they're suing to implement a training program to better equip officers in dealing with citizens that have developmental disabilities.

Quote:
It says that after a Utah Highway Patrol trooper arrived at the Duchesne Library to help, he noticed the boy was scared, shaken and disabled. He suggested to Boren that a trip to the zoo with officers could help him trust police again, but Boren replied, "If the boy can't be trusted on his own, we'll make sure he is not allowed to be out in public," according to court documents.

That in a nutshell is the problem with modern police culture: too many are more concerned with their macho tribal authority than diffusing dangerous situations.



AspieUtah
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26 Jul 2017, 9:55 am

Aristophanes wrote:
ASPartOfMe wrote:
This seems more about the boys ethnicity then his autistic traits or autism.

Curfew for school age kids during the school hours is another problem. Another example of school districts panning off thier responsibilities to law enforcement. What if the kid was sent home because he had a tummy ache?

That's how the article frames it, but we can't know the police officer's thinking and thus it's debatable. He's Hispanic and autistic, two characteristics that stick out like a sore thumb in a white socially conservative area. Unfortunately because of that he was virtually guaranteed to have interactions with police at some point or another. This is entirely why courts reject 'suspicious behavior' as probable cause, what's suspicious to one person is completely normal to another. Also of note, the family isn't suing the PD over racial profiling, rather they're suing to implement a training program to better equip officers in dealing with citizens that have developmental disabilities.

Quote:
It says that after a Utah Highway Patrol trooper arrived at the Duchesne Library to help, he noticed the boy was scared, shaken and disabled. He suggested to Boren that a trip to the zoo with officers could help him trust police again, but Boren replied, "If the boy can't be trusted on his own, we'll make sure he is not allowed to be out in public," according to court documents.

That in a nutshell is the problem with modern police culture: too many are more concerned with their macho tribal authority than diffusing dangerous situations.

Duchesne County is one of Utah's least populated counties ( https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Duchesne_ ... mographics ). If the deputy sheriff is working in his first law-enforcement job, it might be somewhat understandable that he used his training as it was instructed without the bells and whistles we would expect from a more experienced law-enforcement officer. The idea of sensitivity training is good. Having lobbied for similar (LGBT) training with the Salt Lake City Police Department in 1987, I know that such programs do wonders.


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Diagnosed in 2015 with ASD Level 1 by the University of Utah Health Care Autism Spectrum Disorder Clinic using the ADOS-2 Module 4 assessment instrument [11/30] -- Screened in 2014 with ASD by using the University of Cambridge Autism Research Centre AQ (Adult) [43/50]; EQ-60 for adults [11/80]; FQ [43/135]; SQ (Adult) [130/150] self-reported screening inventories -- Assessed since 1978 with an estimated IQ [≈145] by several clinicians -- Contact on WrongPlanet.net by private message (PM)