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GarTog
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05 Sep 2017, 5:46 am

1968 - Hyperactive
1977 - Anxiety and Depression (ongoing)
1983 - Borderline Personality Disorder
1999 - ASD

From 1965 onwards variously "over-sensitive", "anxious", "behavioural problems", "drug problems", "dangerous", "lazy" (a lot!), "stupid", "immature", "out of touch" etc etc...



Voxish
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05 Sep 2017, 9:07 am

I went to the doctors for over 25 years with anxiety, nothing. There nearest I got was a doctor in Ireland who suggested there are lots of "different peronality types" (Well done Sherlock) I diagnosed myself and then went and got it confirmed.


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renaeden
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06 Sep 2017, 3:47 am

Hra1993 wrote:
Thanks for all of your responses. Very insightful. I take Lithium and Lamotrigine. My head is a muddle at the best if times.
I also take lithium.

To answer one of your questions, a psychologist is a person who gives you therapy in the form of talking and there are many types of therapy. A psychologist can't prescribe you medication.

A psychiatrist is also interested in your mental health and they prescribe you medication for negative symptoms you may have.



ASPartOfMe
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07 Sep 2017, 2:21 am

‘We’re not believed,’ says mum who suffers with rare disease and autism.

Quote:
A mum who suffers with Ehlers-Danlos syndrome (EDS) and autism is trying to raise awareness of the conditions to stop people from being misdiagnosed. Jane Green, 55, who lives in Copthorne, did not get her EDS diagnosis until she was 52 and discovered she had autism a year later.

She lives with her two sons. Her 25-year-old son Joshua also has autism. She said: “At the age of 52 I was finally diagnosed with Hypermobility Ehlers-Danlos syndrome (hEDS). This is one of the classifications of the EDS syndromes. “You don’t look ill, you look so young, the doctors said. I am now 54 and I don’t look it. I am not boasting but it is maybe the only benefit advantage I have of hEDS. “We are not believed, doctors just used to say I was bendy, I was walking across a car park one day and my ankle just fell out. “I could always do party tricks along with my sister like sitting moving our joints backwards which used to be called double-jointed. “I didn’t know about EDS – it was only when I went to see a rheumatologist I got the diagnosis.

Jane was told she was hypermobile. She was also diagnosed with chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS) and fibromyalgia and had to give up work in 2015. “I want to show that there is a misdiagnosis,” she said.


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AardvarkGoodSwimmer
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08 Sep 2017, 2:36 pm

Dear_one wrote:

So, to test a drug, you pay for eight weeks and then have an addiction problem. If you do a little research, you'll see that anti-depressants only work in rigged trials. Drugs are tested against a placebo, but in the case of a psychoactive drug, the subjects can tell if they are in the control group and just getting sugar pills. If the control group is given any random drug that affects the mind perceptibly, they are just as likely to improve.

Taking drugs with the intent to change one's mood is basically a catalyst that gives you the permission and expectation of change, and the psychoactive part just helps unstick the old patterns. However, to achieve healthy change, friends or counsellors are almost essential. Unfortunately, paying a counsellor does not result in a kickback to a politician, so the drugs are sometimes the only thing available, no matter how poorly they perform, and the damage done.

I respectfully disagree. :D If a person has depression because of too little serotonin, then an SSRI is literally just what the doctor ordered (Selective Serotonin Reuptake Inhibitor). I've read that it's trial-and-error because everyone's biochemistry processes it a little differently. Wellbutrin is a little different. But even if it's trying one SSRI and then another, the second might work when the first did not. And plus, the cautionary note about phasing down, and not quitting cold turkey.

I do agree that there are battles to be fought and won against Big Pharma, which is one reason why I think it's so important for a person to trust their own reaction to the medication.

And, I have not had great experiences with psychologists, or with the one psychiatrist I saw. My criticism generally comes down to that they're one-trick-ponies. That have one approach and one theoretical orientation. And that's it, that's all they have. I think a person would generally be better off talking with a hair stylist or physical trainer or shiatsu practitioner, as long as they have some street smarts and are willing to listen and maybe pitch a few ideas without judgment. The difference is, they're not ideologues.

My personal plan if things get rough again is to see an internist and ask him or her for a prescription for an antidepressant. And people should know that a quote 'regular' doctor can just as well prescribe an antidepressant as a psychiatrist.

I guess all of us try to find Katmandu in our own way, or at least I can have largely my own life path with some of my own interesting mistakes. :jester:



Last edited by AardvarkGoodSwimmer on 08 Sep 2017, 2:47 pm, edited 1 time in total.

komamanga
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08 Sep 2017, 2:46 pm

I was diagnosed with OCD, Social Phobia, Depression, Depressive Personality Disorder and Schizophrenia before AS. OCD isn't a misdiagnosis, not sure about the other ones.



PerceptionReality
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08 Sep 2017, 3:29 pm

I've also been wrongly diagnosed with bipolar type ii and borderline personality disorder. I spent time in a psychiatric hospital when one of my children was a baby. I'm quite irritated with a psychiatrist who is convinced I must have been sexually abused as a child when I'm almost certain I wasn't. I don't like having this attachment disorder label because it's not correct and psychiatrists don't know much about autism. I have an autistic child so it makes sense anyway.



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08 Sep 2017, 6:47 pm

AardvarkGoodSwimmer wrote:
Dear_one wrote:

So, to test a drug, you pay for eight weeks and then have an addiction problem. If you do a little research, you'll see that anti-depressants only work in rigged trials. Drugs are tested against a placebo, but in the case of a psychoactive drug, the subjects can tell if they are in the control group and just getting sugar pills. If the control group is given any random drug that affects the mind perceptibly, they are just as likely to improve.

Taking drugs with the intent to change one's mood is basically a catalyst that gives you the permission and expectation of change, and the psychoactive part just helps unstick the old patterns. However, to achieve healthy change, friends or counsellors are almost essential. Unfortunately, paying a counsellor does not result in a kickback to a politician, so the drugs are sometimes the only thing available, no matter how poorly they perform, and the damage done.

I respectfully disagree. :D If a person has depression because of too little serotonin, then an SSRI is literally just what the doctor ordered (Selective Serotonin Reuptake Inhibitor). I've read that it's trial-and-error because everyone's biochemistry processes it a little differently. Wellbutrin is a little different. But even if it's trying one SSRI and then another, the second might work when the first did not. And plus, the cautionary note about phasing down, and not quitting cold turkey.

I do agree that there are battles to be fought and won against Big Pharma, which is one reason why I think it's so important for a person to trust their own reaction to the medication.

And, I have not had great experiences with psychologists, or with the one psychiatrist I saw. My criticism generally comes down to that they're one-trick-ponies. That have one approach and one theoretical orientation. And that's it, that's all they have. I think a person would generally be better off talking with a hair stylist or physical trainer or shiatsu practitioner, as long as they have some street smarts and are willing to listen and maybe pitch a few ideas without judgment. The difference is, they're not ideologues.

My personal plan if things get rough again is to see an internist and ask him or her for a prescription for an antidepressant. And people should know that a quote 'regular' doctor can just as well prescribe an antidepressant as a psychiatrist.

I guess all of us try to find Katmandu in our own way, or at least I can have largely my own life path with some of my own interesting mistakes. :jester:


I regret not being able to write only for people who are not yet involved with serotonin drugs, etc, because faith is at least half of healing. I certainly agree about the prescription writers often lacking imagination. I got much better help from a "public health nurse / social worker" because, lacking a PhD, she was still allowed to say "I don't know." I basically still had to do all my own research and diagnosis, but she helped with the terminology and distinguishing overreactions, etc. The Canadian health plan is only really concerned with suicide stats, not mental wellness, but having a counsellor who actually cares makes a big difference.



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08 Sep 2017, 8:28 pm

Not a misdiagnosis perse, but when I started showing autistic traits at about 14 months old doctors did wonder if I was deaf.


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Raleigh
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08 Sep 2017, 8:34 pm

A lot of my traits were put down to hearing loss, anxiety and depression.
I think I've been depressed since birth.
Was first officially diagnosed with depression at 13.


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AardvarkGoodSwimmer
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13 Sep 2017, 12:19 pm

Dear_one wrote:
. . . I got much better help from a "public health nurse / social worker" because, lacking a PhD, she was still allowed to say "I don't know." . . .
I'd turn it on its head and say, it's probably precisely because she did not have a PhD that she felt comfortable saying "I don't know."

In any case, I'm glad you were able to get effective help. :D And the part where she helped with terminology and distinguishing overreactions sounds pretty good, too. Might I classify this as an example of helping but not overhelping?



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13 Sep 2017, 1:01 pm

EclecticWarrior wrote:
Not a misdiagnosis perse, but when I started showing autistic traits at about 14 months old doctors did wonder if I was deaf.

Interesting. Apparently it was originally thought I might have been partially blind then partially deaf. Turns out the latter was correct due to allergies blocking my ear canal.

I also have no doubt that if I were to start school just a couple of years later I would have been diagnosed with ADHD. All my report cards say "excellent student but needs to learn to pay attention". The teacher would constantly try to trip me up for "not paying attention" and I always knew the answer. Still, they continued to ask me questions over and over whenever I was looking out the window or at the floor. It got really annoying after a while!



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13 Sep 2017, 1:24 pm

AardvarkGoodSwimmer wrote:
Dear_one wrote:
. . . I got much better help from a "public health nurse / social worker" because, lacking a PhD, she was still allowed to say "I don't know." . . .
I'd turn it on its head and say, it's probably precisely because she did not have a PhD that she felt comfortable saying "I don't know."

In any case, I'm glad you were able to get effective help. :D And the part where she helped with terminology and distinguishing overreactions sounds pretty good, too. Might I classify this as an example of helping but not overhelping?


Yes; she did what she could, and stopped there. We were like co-researchers on my case.



Goth Fairy
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15 Sep 2017, 12:52 am

I didn't get mis-diagnosed because I was too scared to go and see a doctor. But I definately had mental helath problems, including suicidal thoughts.

Eventually I had some kind of a break down where I cried for several days and couldn't find the will to do anything, and still instead of taking me to a doctor, my parents took me to some Church people to pray about it. Which didn't help.

If I had been put in the system things might of turned out very differently, I don't know if would have been better or worse, but I am in the age bracket where they probably wouldn't have been diagnosed as Asperger's.


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15 Sep 2017, 1:04 am

I was diagnosed with low functioning OCD and slight ADD. I had multiple anxiety spectrum disorders but I was placed four or five grade levels above everything else so they didn't diagnose me with learning disabilities any delay which is clearly present in other areas like social ability and number sense.