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JustFoundHere
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13 Mar 2018, 3:04 pm

From the perspectives of my experience with Aspergers (as someone who is not in a science related occupation): From watching 'The Big Bang Theory' TV series, I increasingly understand why science can be of interest to people on the Autism Spectrum.

It's especially notable when 'The Big Bang Theory' portrays characters on the Autism spectrum interacting with daunting Neurotypical environments.



DarthMetaKnight
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13 Mar 2018, 4:52 pm

Science appeals to autistics because we're smart and science is awesome.

Image


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JustFoundHere
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19 Mar 2018, 6:59 pm

JustFoundHere wrote:
From the perspectives of my experience with Aspergers (as someone who is not in a science related occupation): From watching 'The Big Bang Theory' TV series, I increasingly understand why science can be of interest to people on the Autism Spectrum.

It's especially notable when 'The Big Bang Theory' portrays characters on the Autism spectrum interacting with daunting Neurotypical environments.


ADDENDUM:

(Correction/edit from previous post): It's especially notable and funny when 'The Big Bang Theory' portrays situations of Neurotypical environments.

The producers of the 'The Big Bang Theory' thoughtfully downplayed Aspergers, and yielded a terrific comedy (see LINK).

If something like 'The Big Bang Theory' combined both drama, and comedy, neurotypical situations would have been portrayed as more of an art, and less mentions of science; as neurotypical situations would clearly treat detailed science descriptions as "over people's heads!" The 2009 movie 'ADAM' is one good example.

* To answer the topic's question of why science appeals to people on the Autism spectrum: Science provides that "anchor of sorts" for people on the spectrum i.e., the sciences apply classifying, mapping, describing the phenomenon that underlies all of life; that is classifying can be that natural trait for people on the spectrum.

'The Big Bang Theory' TV-show exaggerates just how the sciences act as that "anchor of sorts" - even in neurotypical situations.

LINK: Review of TV-series 'The Big Bang Theory' - New York Times - 'Exploring the Complexities of Nerdiness for Laughs'
http://www.nytimes.com/2010/04/27/science/27bang.html



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20 Mar 2018, 2:45 am

It strives towards the truth. Unlike religion.

When it is wrong, it can change. Unlike religion.


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20 Mar 2018, 4:56 am

I went back to university recently. It's had an amazing effect on everything: happiness, executive funtioning, mental sharpness, ability to talk to people.

It of course depends what the costs are, but the way I think, studying is never wrong.


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20 Mar 2018, 7:59 am

Doesn't it appeal to NTs as well? I know autistis like collecting information but the purpose of science goes far beyond that and so science is for everyone.


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23 Apr 2018, 2:06 am

Science appeals to autistic people because DINO FIGHTS!! !


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DarthMetaKnight
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23 Apr 2018, 2:14 am

Roar! Dinosaurs!


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24 Apr 2018, 5:50 pm

DINOSAURS


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25 Apr 2018, 9:13 am

When I remarked that I found practical scientific problems more comfortable and easier to solve than interpersonal problems, I was told that it's probably because I can take a screwdriver to science problems, and experiment on them, but that can't be done with people.

I like the pressure towards honesty and flawless thinking that science gives. I get very fixated on technique-scouting, where I try out ways of solving a problem until I find one that does the job well, thus adding to the list of clever and maybe useful things I can do well. It's also a good feeling when I can pass on the methods to other people, which costs me nothing. I guess I define myself fairly strongly as having a lot of rare technical skills at my fingertips. When I see evidence that I'm getting somewhere with my researches, it's hard for me to feel mentally disabled.

Science is a good place for pathological honesty, pattern-recognition skills, noticing things others don't, repetitive processing of data, hyperfocus, and obsessional interest, and social ineptitude isn't a direct barrier to doing good science, it's only an indirect barrier in that I'm not all that good at communicating with other people so I miss out on a lot of guidance that could save me from re-inventing the wheel.



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25 Apr 2018, 1:33 pm

magz wrote:
None of these messy "different points of view" and insolubable arguments.


Yeah! Whenever anything is framed in terms of “point of view” (unless you’re literally talking about visual perspective :P) or “opinion”, you can tell the rest of the conversation is going to be a complete waste of time. Unfortunately, the only acceptable way to hold any conversation with normal people seems to be to make every effort to ensure it is, in fact, a pristine, immaculate, chemically pure waste of time.

magz wrote:
Also, in physics it doesn't matter who I am, my name, my age, the way I dress, the way I speak - all this is insignificant so I can feel at ease, no need to use my power supplies for adjusting to social life.


I think science could be defined as the only human activity not ultimately based on bullying. That’s why I find it so amazing that it’s managed to exist at all.

magz wrote:
And, last but not least, I'm quite good at my small field, so why not like it?


Congrats!

I only learned very late in life for something so simple that people really hate it if you think you’re better than them at anything, and they couldn’t care less why you do. Also, the way they prove you’re not is by beating you up, and the audience usually agrees enthusiastically that this is indeed what proves who is better. Again, natural selection: it doesn’t matter who is right, but who is left.


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25 Apr 2018, 1:42 pm

I always come back to this quote (usually attributed to Richard Feynman, but there is some dispute about that.)
"I prefer to have questions that cannot be answered than answers that cannot be questioned."


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DarthMetaKnight
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25 Apr 2018, 1:43 pm

Trogluddite wrote:
I always come back to this quote (usually attributed to Richard Feynman, but there is some dispute about that.)
"I prefer to have questions that cannot be answered than answers that cannot be questioned."


That's a fantastic quote. I wish I had come up with that.


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Spiderpig
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25 Apr 2018, 3:21 pm

I think he also said something about not having a mind so open that your brains fall off. By the way, as any mathematician will tell you, an empty mind is both open and closed.

I was about to say my favorite Feynman quote is the one about the Feynman point, but it looks like it’s since been declared likely spurious:

Wikipedia wrote:
A sequence of six 9s occurs in the decimal representation of π, starting at the 762nd decimal place. It has become famous because of the mathematical coincidence and because of the idea that one could memorize the digits of π up to that point, recite them and end with "nine nine nine nine nine nine and so on", which seems to suggest that π is rational. The earliest known mention of this idea occurs in Douglas Hofstadter's 1985 book Metamagical Themas, where Hofstadter states
Douglas Hofstadter, Metamagical Themas wrote:
I myself once learned 380 digits of π, when I was a crazy high-school kid. My never-attained ambition was to reach the spot, 762 digits out in the decimal expansion, where it goes "999999", so that I could recite it out loud, come to those six 9's, and then impishly say, "and so on!"

This sequence of six nines is sometimes called the "Feynman point", after physicist Richard Feynman, who has also been claimed to have stated this same idea in a lecture. It is not clear when, or even if, Feynman made such a statement, however; it is not mentioned in published biographies or in his autobiographies, and is unknown to his biographer, James Gleick.

So let’s take a deep breath, and …
Code:
3.141592653589793238462643383279502884197169399375105820974944592307816406286208
99862803482534211706798214808651328230664709384460955058223172535940812848111745
02841027019385211055596446229489549303819644288109756659334461284756482337867831
65271201909145648566923460348610454326648213393607260249141273724587006606315588
17488152092096282925409171536436789259036001133053054882046652138414695194151160
94330572703657595919530921861173819326117931051185480744623799627495673518857527
24891227938183011949129833673362440656643086021394946395224737190702179860943702
77053921717629317675238467481846766940513200056812714526356082778577134275778960
91736371787214684409012249534301465495853710507922796892589235420199561121290219
6086403441815981362977477130996051870721134999999…

… and so on!


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28 Apr 2018, 6:00 pm

I don't really get it either. I'm bad at science(I'm worse in some sciences than others) but I s#cked at about all the major requried skewl subjects due to learning disabilities. I'm not that great witch technology either. I mentioned Aspergers/Autism on dating sites for a bit & every women who messaged me was hopping I was some rich guy in the IT field & they quit chatting 1ce I told em I wasn't.


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