How do you feel about the city or town you live in?

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AlanMooresBeard
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25 Oct 2017, 4:53 pm

BirdInFlight wrote:
To AlanMooresBeard -- I was born and raised in London. Years ago I actually LEFT it for a quieter city and I was glad to because I hated it even back then, and it wasn't even so intolerable as it is now. I'm 56 years old so I remember London from long ago; you're only 31.

I came back in good faith and was horrified to find London is even worse to function in than it used to be.

I have the perception of someone who did go away from it for long enough that I was shocked at the changes for the worst that is has become. This city was a bit of a nightmare before but I can tell you with confidence that it has changed greatly and is even more of a nightmare.

The noise isn't even only about construction noise -- the noise is everywhere in the form of fast-flowing traffic on any main thoroughfare.

I live right on a main thoroughfare. It sounds like you at least live on a quieter residential street maybe? I live right on a main road that has traffic flowing through it literally 24 hours a day. I have double glazed windows and even with them all closed, I still hear the constant noise of the motor vehicles outside.

It's also a red London bus route and the nightbuses run all night. My building is over a Tube line, and even though I'm on the third floor, the rumble of the tube transmits up through the building, and you can hear it -- one is going by as I type this, even though it's underground beneath me and three floors.

But it's not even about my home -- there is constant noise as soon as I step outside to just go anywhere. Everywhere I walk as soon as leave my building, it's a main road and I also live right next to the next thing down from a motorway but not quite a motorway (freeway in the USA).

I have to walk next to that almost-motorway all the way to the shops, and they are on another loud, noisy trafficky roadway. Basically there is nowhere I walk or cycle that is actually peaceful or without the rumble of motor traffic.

I'm surrounded by noise in my home and I'm surrounded by noise outside just going from A to B.

Even transportation is pure noise. The buses these days have unbelievably loud engines -- what the EFF is that about? The airport coaches regularly use my road and they sound like Concorde is coming down the street.

Get on a Tube? Bring your ear plugs. There's a lot that is completely intolerable in this city.

You have probably never left it or felt the need to leave. I left it and got another perspective.

Sadly I'm in no position to move anywhere again at present, so I'm stuck with my reality here. Or I would move.

I live in the East End and I too have fast and easy access to central areas. Except that I hate being on a tube train. Autistic sensory problems -- I have them.


I actually live on a main road too but I live in an apartment block and my home is on the other side of the building away from the road. However, there is a railway line directly opposite which has trains constantly going past but I'm quite used to it now so the noise doesn't really bother me. I also have to walk along a main road to get to the nearest rail/tube station and shops but there is a riverside area for at least part of the way that I can walk down for a more pleasant route.

I agree with you about sensory issues on public transport. I don't use the tube unless I need to but when I do, I just put up with the noise and do something like read a book to take my mind off it. I find this easier to do on the sub-surface lines than the deep level ones as the trains on those lines are more spacious and tend to be less noisy in my experience.

You're correct that I've never left London or ever felt the need to. Everyone I know is here and I have a great support network so there's no reason for me to live anywhere else. I know that not everyone is lucky enough to have that and I am very grateful that I am in that position.



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25 Oct 2017, 6:08 pm

Leicester (UK). I've got mixed feelings about it. I get sick of all the red-brick buildings, they're quite nice as individual Victorian buildings but it gets very samey, there's very little else but red bricks, hardly any grey or blue bricks, and not much stone. Otherwise I like the architecture apart from the modern stuff, though they've got modern buildings in most towns and cities these days.

I don't suppose the people are much different from those in any other town of a similar size and population density, the Muslim population is pretty high, I've got no political or social issue with that, though in my heart of hearts I must confess get kind of fed up aesthetically with seeing their stereotyped attire, I prefer to see a bit more colour and less uniform conformity. I don't like to have to see all these women covered from head to toe but I'm at least equally dismayed about the plethora of scantily-clad females - it's not serious racism or sexism, I'm just picky and grumpy and if somebody asks me how I feel about a thing, I'm not going to dilute it with political correctness. The main roads are too congested with vehicles and rude or dangerous driving, it's kind of polluted and noisy. The city council seems obsessed with grabbing money from residents. There's a litter problem, though not a huge one. There's some courtesy about, but not a lot.

Really I don't see Leicester as much different from any other town. The city council makes me want to berate the place when it does its propaganda stuff, they kept ramming this "One Leicester" slogan down our throats, presumably it was designed to sublimate partisan tension or to somehow attract investors, but to me it was plain silly marketing hype, the city is divided to some extent and I expect it always will be. Another daft slogan they bandied about everywhere seemed sardonically apt on the day a couple of violent maniacs tried to smash into a car while the female driver was still in it. That happened on our street, she had her wits about her and managed to drive away, poor lady was in quite an alarmed state afterwards, naturally. The slogan was "A city full of surprises" - I just though if they spent a bit less time trying to brainwash people and a bit more on policing and managing the place properly, that particular surprise might have been avoided. I don't hang about outside much at night.

Some years later while living on a different street they found a dead body in the boot of a car very close to my front door. I've known of a few nasty things like that happening locally, and a lot of lesser antisocial things, my house was burgled while I was in the USA, the police smashed the door down (something about thinking there was a dead body in the house) and the damage they did cost me more to put right than the burglary did, told my son it'd just be a matter of claiming compensation, but when I tried they denied it and refused to pay.

All in all, my gut reaction is that I don't care much for Leicester, but like I say it's probably no different from most overcrowded cities. Most of the time nothing all that bad happens, and some of the residents have been good to me and I count them as friends. The council gave me a free bus pass when I was 60 years old. Some of the parks are quite nice. The outlying villages are beautiful. I'd live in one if I could afford to.



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25 Oct 2017, 7:26 pm

I love my city, it has a lot of natural beauty, being on an isthmus between two beautiful harbours, and has beautiful parks, trees, mountains, volcanoes and forest areas. In the past ten years though it has become overpopulated and the traffic is terrible, the roads were never built to cope with these huge volumes and gridlock is continual. We have gone past peak demographic intensity population wise, and the infrastructure is not coping.



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25 Oct 2017, 8:54 pm

I can't help suspecting that eric76 just punked us with some episodes of "Little House on the Prairie."

Seriously, are you f**king around?



Esmerelda Weatherwax
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25 Oct 2017, 9:37 pm

While I was working my very last job, I lived in a "model city" - started in the 1960s. The original developer passed away in the early 2000s, the firm was bought out, things started going where they usually do when that happens, i.e. downhill and rapidly accelerating.

So before I retired I found a place to live in a sort-a kind-a retirement village, well away from there. Lots of retirees around me, but also young families. Affordable so far (touch wood).

I moved out here for peace and quiet to recover from major overwork-burnout and use "working on the house and garden" as occupational therapy. It's niftier than I initially realized. The mid-size town literally 5 minutes away has history and museums and decent restaurants. (Edit in: and ICE CREAM!) It's there if I want it, but it doesn't intrude, and when I head out for groceries etc. I can see mountains. Old, old mountains. Which are just gorgeous when it snows.

And oh, oh, I can watch the day/night terminator sweep across the sky in the evenings, and that is one of the things I love best in the world.

The only things I wish we had here are the aurora borealis and a good view of the Milky Way - I used to live in Oregon, long ago, and I will never forget those.


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Last edited by Esmerelda Weatherwax on 25 Oct 2017, 9:41 pm, edited 1 time in total.

TheAP
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25 Oct 2017, 9:39 pm

I like it. I like the downtown and the waterfront. The only thing I don't like is all the graffiti.



eric76
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25 Oct 2017, 9:40 pm

BirdInFlight wrote:
I can't help suspecting that eric76 just punked us with some episodes of "Little House on the Prairie."

Seriously, are you f**king around?


It would never have crossed my mind to make that up.



Esmerelda Weatherwax
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25 Oct 2017, 9:43 pm

^^ Back in the '70s I went out to Rapid City, SD and it was as you describe. Nobody locked anything! And when I was there it was warm during the day, cool at night, and safe 24/7/365.

Oh to have that where I live now. It'd be perfect here, then.


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eric76
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26 Oct 2017, 12:25 am

Esmerelda Weatherwax wrote:
^^ Back in the '70s I went out to Rapid City, SD and it was as you describe. Nobody locked anything! And when I was there it was warm during the day, cool at night, and safe 24/7/365.

Oh to have that where I live now. It'd be perfect here, then.


The nearby town, 20 miles away, quickly became my niece's son's favorite place in the world when he was about 9 or 10. In his hometown, he wasn't permitted to leave the yard without an adult present because of the dangers. When my sister came up to visit a few years ago, she brought him (her grandson) with her.

We were sitting in my office talking and he said that he wanted to go to the Dairy Queen. My sister told him it was three blocks down the street and to go ahead. He thought that she misunderstood him and said again that he wanted to go to Dairy Queen. When she said go ahead, he tried again. After that, it started to dawn on him that he didn't need an adult with him to go to the Dairy Queen down the street.

When he got back he was so thrilled to have so much freedom that he felt compelled to describe his trip there in great detail. Then he said that he wanted to go to the park and play. My sister told him to go on. That time, he didn't try again -- he headed out the door and down the street to the park. He never dreamed that such freedom was available.

In comparison, around here you see kids as young as 5 or 6 going to the park by themselves or with a brother or sister a year or two older than themselves.



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26 Oct 2017, 12:32 am

BirdInFlight wrote:
The only people who really think wonderful things about London are --- people who don't actually live here, lol.

That'd be me. :D I've always wanted to go there, nasty underbelly and all. :wink:
But I don't like "living" anywhere. I'm nomadic. I start to freak out if I'm "living" somewhere, stuck there, with all the repetitive aggravations that start to come up in place. To me, having to live in a van, boat, caravan etc isn't a bad thing, it's a preference. I'm not fussy, and I don't see the point of luxuries that are unnecessary. Transient or itinerant accommodations of varying types do me fine.


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26 Oct 2017, 1:56 am

I lived in Las Vegas until I was 13. In a quiet area that was miles of new cookie cutter houses. It got ridiculously hot in the summer. I visited the strip plenty of times. I liked all the lights and fabricated architecture.



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26 Oct 2017, 9:53 am

It's interesting to say the least. We get massive amounts of snow in the winter and some heat in the summer. We don't get a ton of rain usually. There isn't too much for people to do here, except go to the giant shopping mall that wants to become the biggest in the country. In the summer, we get the state fair and the amusement parks can be fun, but a little overwhelming for someone like me. If you want to go to a concert, you usually have to travel a couple of hours, but they did build a new venue for music, but not a lot of shows come that I personally enjoy.

For the record, I live in New York State. Near Oswego :D


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26 Oct 2017, 1:43 pm

The town I live in is by the sea too and although I love the sea the beaches here aren't pristine or stunning, more often they are a tad boggy. I am looking into joining the local yacht club though to learn to sail. Which is exciting. I am lucky to at the moment have support workers helping me a few hours a week so I am going to try to make the most of it by trying new stuff like sailing that I would usually not do so well with on my own (because of really awkward social skills).



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26 Oct 2017, 1:48 pm

I live in the largest town in the UK. We are a 30 minute train ride from London so people dismiss it as a satellite town but we have a great history, some significant stuff has happened here over the centuries and I think it had some great areas to live.



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26 Oct 2017, 5:04 pm

Good old Copenhagen....it gets noisier and noisier, people are getting more pissed off in general - Large-city symptoms.
It´s sad. The historic "feel" in Cph. is diminishing and a lot of its charm has gone, so I choose to roam the more provincial parts in my daily life. They are still there. I live in one of them.


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