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Keladry
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28 Oct 2017, 3:28 pm

For those of you who were diagnosed as adults, either recently or non-recently. What changes, if any did you make in your life after you were diagnosed? Were they helpful? Would you say that being diagnosed has effected you positively or negatively?



B19
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28 Oct 2017, 3:57 pm

Initially self discovery for me thanks to Tony Attwood's book. I was instantly able to place a lot of past events and facets of myself in a believable context, and it was the greatest aha moment of my life.



underwater
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29 Oct 2017, 12:07 pm

I was diagnosed just recently, so I'm not entirely sure what all the results will be.

So far:

- massive mood improvement
- more direction; I finally let go of the pressure to do things I'm unable to
- husband and closest family a lot more supportive, though some of them seem to find it scary or embarrassing to talk about


The strangest thing is a certain feeling of being more 'visible' if I can call it that. Most of my life, people have ignored my emotions, as if I didn't have any. Now I'm able to speak more openly with people about things that affect me, but it leaves me feeling both more accepted and more vulnerable simultaneously. I spend less energy on 'passing', but this seems to worry some people I see less often.

So, pros and cons.

I suspect that if I had been a lot younger and hadn't tried so many things in life, people would put less faith in the diagnosis; as it is, they know I've tried so hard for years and that there must be some explanation for it.


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TheAvenger161173
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29 Oct 2017, 1:47 pm

Understanding why things make me feel stressed,anxious,distressed,and adapting to them with changes. Understanding from others,why iam the way iam and why I have certain behaviours. So really self understanding(can't think of the word) and the same from others.



garysoneji
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29 Oct 2017, 1:52 pm

The diagnosis has been quite positive mentally. Nothing else has changed. Same as underwater stated, I no longer attempt to force myself past my limitations. It was freeing learning that my problems and complaints were me observing a neurological issue and not an opinion.


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SaveFerris
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29 Oct 2017, 2:42 pm

garysoneji wrote:
Nothing else has changed. Same as underwater


I read that as underwear :lol:


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nephets
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29 Oct 2017, 2:52 pm

Diagnosed a few years back, though self-diagnosed about 15 years ago! I find the official diagnosis has made me to come to places like this and learn more about people like me. It has helped because I now have expectations of myself based on knowledge of the syndrome. However, it is depressing to have confirmed that you have something that cannot be cured. It's been bitter-sweet, really.



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29 Oct 2017, 2:58 pm

nephets wrote:
However, it is depressing to have confirmed that you have something that cannot be cured. It's been bitter-sweet, really.


That's one of the reasons I am scared about my assessment even though it might answer lots of things.


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Rukkus
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20 Nov 2017, 11:14 am

Diagnosed recently about a week ago... More positive than negative, sometimes I wonder the reason for being here and feeling doomed. But there is more understanding and acceptance of myself.



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20 Nov 2017, 1:13 pm

I actually created an account here to ask the exact same question...

I'm 37 years old and have been diagnosed earlier this year (8 months ago).

I'm not gonna go through the process that made me seek a diagnosis here, but it was a massive relief as well as a shock.

Not knowing much about Aspergers and autism until that point, I had no idea that there was a connection between sensory hypersensitivity, being blunt, being better off on my own, not recognising emotions, not understanding social cues, repetitive behaviour, restricted interest, etc.

Everything that I'd been through suddenly made sense, and I could stop blaming myself for being less capable than most people in social situations. I understood why I have to block my ears when an ambulance or police vehicle drives past me, while other people look completely indifferent to these horribly loud sirens. And so much more.

On the other hand, all my difficulties seem more obvious to me now. For example, how bad it makes me feel to be in a crowded supermarket (harsh lights, loads of people, too many sounds), and finding out they've discontinued the stuff I get all the time (intense frustration). It feels like it's worse than before but maybe it's just that I'm more aware of it.

Very often I suddenly remember an incident from the past, that I hadn't thought about for years and years, and see it in a different light.

It's like the twist at the end of "Shutter Island". Once you know what's going on, you can watch the film again and it all makes sense (maybe not the best example in terms of mental health, but a good example in terms of storytelling).

Finally I was hoping I'd be able to get out of this invisible cage one day, but now I know I have to live with it. It's not gonna go away. Fighting it for 37 years probably helped me push the bars apart a little bit but it's been so hard that it almost killed me.

So yeah... I say it's a giant leap on the road to inner peace (though I'll certainly never get there). The day of the Aspergers assessment I also discovered I had ADHD. I had no idea what ADHD was so that was another shock.

Sorry for super long post. :oops:



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20 Nov 2017, 1:35 pm

I avoid or prepare for things that I now know are bad for me or will trigger me because unlike before I now have a much better idea of what they are.


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20 Nov 2017, 2:32 pm

It's still really new to me. I self diagnosed on my birthday in February, and got an actual diagnosis three weeks ago today. Still don't have details of that, get to see someone tomorrow.
So far, positive, overall. Massive relief. I'm currently in a really difficult situation, so I haven't been able to make any changes, really. But having a diagnosis is opening some doors for me, and I'm looking forward to doing some self exploration. I've been homeless for about two years now, and my social difficulty doesn't make it any easier to get out of that. The non profit that runs the shelter I've been in for the last month is going to get me a place now, though. So that is a positive change. And should help me get back to doing my thing.
The only new change I've been able to implement so far is to have a better explanation for myself and others. I still have to tell people when I meet them that I have a really hard time with people, but now I can offer a little bit more information. And that has helped.
I do have plans for changes. Things that I intend to do differently now, but they're momentarily on hold. Awaiting a more stable living situation.



Biscuitman
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20 Nov 2017, 2:41 pm

I am not so hard on myself anymore. But I do find myself using AS as an excuse in my head to not do things whereas before diagnosis I would try a bit harder.



Keladry
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20 Nov 2017, 7:01 pm

Thank you everyone for your posts here.

Like many others who wrote here, I was recently diagnosed as well, last July. It makes a lot of sense now I know. But then again, I also made it this far without knowing, and without any support or help, so it's been kind of hard to process - what should I do with this information now? Do I need help or support? If so, which areas and is it available? How can I use this information to improve my life?

One thing I've been doing is going to an adult ASD support group, which, so far hasn't helped much as most of the others there are much lower on the spectrum and require a lot more support, and topics in the group focus on those. I've also gone to a small therapy group for those on the spectrum, which has been surprisingly helpful.

In personal life, I've told my immediate family and maybe 4 or 5 friends. Every person I've told has reacted by "I'm not surprised." I didn't realize I was that obvious :(

I think too knowing has given me a lot more peace and understanding for myself, especially regarding a couple of very specific situations that were almost certainly a result of me being on the spectrum. But it's also made me realize how many people I've probably confused and accidently insulted over the years, including ones I care about :(

I don't know...where does it go from this point?



Slug on a Bike
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11 Jul 2018, 8:26 am

My late diagnosis
has me flipping thru
my scrapbook of a life
and relabeling
many of the pictures.
Tough, but interesting.

I wonder about
my quickness to apologize
for meltdowns,
stand-and-stares,
and dull as dirt
routines routines routines.

Newly fascinating
is my wife of 39 years.
How has she stayed?