If I took an antibiotic, and probiotic, at the same time

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naturalplastic
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05 Nov 2017, 12:58 pm

Which would win?



nick007
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18 Nov 2017, 6:00 am

My dad was recommended by a his doc to take a probiotic while he was taking an antibiotic. I hear lots of docs recommended that because antibiotics can really mess up the stomach. My dad was taking the antibiotic because of a bad infection in his finger & he tried a couple before it started going away. He started feeling nauseous & having diarrhea so the doc recommended he take the probiotic to calm his settle his stomach & it helped after abit.


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naturalplastic
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25 Nov 2017, 12:39 pm

Interesting.

The antibiotic helped his finger, but the probiotic helped his tummy. So they effected different body parts and didn't head on collide.



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25 Nov 2017, 4:35 pm

Sounds like that's hammering the problem from two sides. The antibiotic tends to kill off the flora so putting in probiotics is an attempt to rebuild what you'd actually want to keep.


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nurseangela
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25 Nov 2017, 5:09 pm

You have "good" bacteria in your gut and probiotics help to increase these.

Antibiotics kill certain bacteria that are specific - that is why blood cultures are taken to see what kind of bacteria is in the blood and that tells what antibiotic would be best. Until blood cultures come in, they use a "broad spectrum" antibiotic.

Some antibiotics can kill the good bacteria in the gut causing what is called "C-Diff" and diarrhea which actually needs another antibiotic "Flagyl" to combat the C-diff. Probiotics can help increase the good gut bacteria so that is a time when both antibiotic and probiotic might be taken.


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Skilpadde
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26 Nov 2017, 1:47 am

Whenever I've been on antibiotics, the doctor has usually told me to eat Yoghurt or cultured milk


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02 Dec 2017, 1:36 am

Skilpadde wrote:
Whenever I've been on antibiotics, the doctor has usually told me to eat Yoghurt or cultured milk


I was on Doxycycline a few months ago for a sinus infection. My biggest issue is that after ten days I started gaining weight quickly.

It turns out that Doxycycline is sometimes prescribed to people to help them gain weight.

It ended up leveling out at about 10 pounds more than before I took it.



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04 Dec 2017, 9:55 pm

kokopelli wrote:
Skilpadde wrote:
Whenever I've been on antibiotics, the doctor has usually told me to eat Yoghurt or cultured milk


I was on Doxycycline a few months ago for a sinus infection. My biggest issue is that after ten days I started gaining weight quickly.

It turns out that Doxycycline is sometimes prescribed to people to help them gain weight.

It ended up leveling out at about 10 pounds more than before I took it.

8-O 8-O 8-O
No way! I'm on that shite periodically for skin issues! I had no idea it could cause weight gain! That explains a lot, then. Is the effect a subtle one, or a drastic one? 10 pounds for you?
Typical. It seems to me that every problem I have, there is always "weight gain" as a side effect lurking in there somewhere. It's a miracle I'm not obese. Just left with too much around the gut.
As to the probiotic that always seemed a bit mean-spirited to me. Talk about a raw deal at life for those little organisms. Grown probably in a lab somewhere, crushed into a pill, eaten by a large animal, only to be killed off by antibiotic pills just when they've finally found a nice environment to swim around in in the stomach.


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05 Dec 2017, 11:18 am

There's some interesting research into antibiotics going on that indicates that by taking antibiotics, your body makes it easier for bacteria to survive!

About the research from Scientific American at https://www.scientificamerican.com/article/a-new-antibiotic-weakness-mdash-drugs-themselves-help-bacteria-survive:

Quote:
A New Antibiotic Weakness—Drugs Themselves Help Bacteria Survive

...

Antibiotics save lives, but they are not fail-safe. Even when microbes haven’t acquired drug-evading genetic mutations—a hallmark of antibiotic resistance—the medications don’t always clear infections. A new study identifies a surprising reason why: At infection sites, antibiotics change the natural mixture of chemicals made by the body in ways that protect infecting bacteria. They also thwart the ability of the host’s immune cells to fight off the intruders.

...

Collins and his colleagues at MIT’s Broad Institute, Harvard University and the University of California, San Diego, infected mice with Escherichia coli bacteria and gave some of them antibiotics. The scientists then took tissue samples from the mice and analyzed levels of certain bodily chemicals—known as metabolites—that bacteria can use to grow and multiply. At the sites of their infections, mice fed antibiotics had higher levels of some metabolites when compared with drug-free mice. The levels were also higher than what scientists detected in healthy mice.

To see if the metabolites changed antibiotic effectiveness, Collins and his colleagues added these isolated chemicals to E. coli grown in lab plates. They found that they needed to add higher drug concentrations to kill the bacteria when some of the chemicals were present. In other words, the chemicals that had been ramped up in the infected, antibiotic-treated animals were, ironically, making bacteria less susceptible to the drugs.

These chemical changes were incited not by bacterial cells, but by the animals’ own cells. The researchers learned this after giving antibiotics to so-called “germ-free” mice that had no bacteria and saw the same chemical changes. “It really is surprising,” says Eric Brown, the Canada Research Chair in Microbial Chemical Biology at McMaster University in Ontario, who was not involved in the research. “Antibiotics are supposed to be ‘magic bullets’ directed at bacteria but not at the person suffering from infection. Well, this work suggests that there is more going on, on the host side of things, than we might have thought.”


I've heard it said that taking antibiotics can make you more dependent on antibiotics for future infections, but was never sure whether or not to believe it.