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HistoryGal
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30 Dec 2017, 8:30 pm

I prefer animals to most people especially the coddled lil people that never pay consequences for their actions.



kazanscube
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31 Dec 2017, 2:33 pm

I was not fond of school at that particular time, as though autism did exist Aspergers did not making such very difficult.I had struggled with my school work and honestly wished that I had been able to find the needed supports yet, there were none as such.As well, I was bullied though not on a physical level but, rather a verbal & psychological one that even today left linger effects.I had to include the fact, that my permanently exiled father also psychologically tormented me when I was a young child as well so, combining that with the previous mentioned items of interest made school life problematic.


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ladyelaine
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31 Dec 2017, 2:55 pm

HistoryGal wrote:
I prefer animals to most people especially the coddled lil people that never pay consequences for their actions.


I'm sick of the special lil people not suffering consequences for their actions.



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31 Dec 2017, 2:59 pm

kazanscube wrote:
I was not fond of school at that particular time, as though autism did exist Aspergers did not making such very difficult.I had struggled with my school work and honestly wished that I had been able to find the needed supports yet, there were none as such.As well, I was bullied though not on a physical level but, rather a verbal & psychological one that even today left linger effects.I had to include the fact, that my permanently exiled father also psychologically tormented me when I was a young child as well so, combining that with the previous mentioned items of interest made school life problematic.


Most of my teachers knew nothing about autism. I feel like I could have done much better in kindergarten if my teacher had had any knowledge about autism. It would have also helped if other parents weren't constantly hogging up my teacher's time after school.



HistoryGal
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01 Jan 2018, 1:35 pm

You know those types of parents who have to treat kids teachers as people to socialize with even if it interferes with the the other kids. Must be bored housewives. Ugh.



ladyelaine
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01 Jan 2018, 3:22 pm

HistoryGal wrote:
You know those types of parents who have to treat kids teachers as people to socialize with even if it interferes with the the other kids. Must be bored housewives. Ugh.


Or they want the whole world to revolve around their kids. Some parents like their kids to be treated special and they helicopter their kids.



TheAllegedlyQuietOne
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01 Jan 2018, 5:51 pm

ladyelaine wrote:
I hated school growing up. There were so many things about school that sucked.

1. I was bullied endlessly.
2. I was a faster learner than my classmates so I was bored all the time even in honors classes.
3. I hated homework.
4. Some kids hogged up the teachers' attention( the troublemakers and the butt kissers).
5. Teachers played favourites.
6. Some teachers had really poor class management skills.

Did school suck for you? If so, why?


1 (although more off and on than continuous), 3 (with a passion), 5 (more a case of a person with "good" reputation could do no wrong, one with "bad" reputation could do no right) 6. Definitely this one.

The bullying was psychological, and probably wouldn't have been such a problem if it wasn't for the lack of emotional support from anywhere (teachers, for example had a "toughen up" attitude).

Edit: I was also quite "unbalanced" academically, which probably frustrated my teachers and was often attributed to "laziness/lack of effort" than a difficulty. Unfortunately that was internalized as self criticism.



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01 Jan 2018, 6:07 pm

TheAllegedlyQuietOne wrote:
ladyelaine wrote:
I hated school growing up. There were so many things about school that sucked.

1. I was bullied endlessly.
2. I was a faster learner than my classmates so I was bored all the time even in honors classes.
3. I hated homework.
4. Some kids hogged up the teachers' attention( the troublemakers and the butt kissers).
5. Teachers played favourites.
6. Some teachers had really poor class management skills.

Did school suck for you? If so, why?


1 (although more off and on than continuous), 3 (with a passion), 5 (more a case of a person with "good" reputation could do no wrong, one with "bad" reputation could do no right) 6. Definitely this one.

The bullying was psychological, and probably wouldn't have been such a problem if it wasn't for the lack of emotional support from anywhere (teachers, for example had a "toughen up" attitude).

Edit: I was also quite "unbalanced" academically, which probably frustrated my teachers and was often attributed to "laziness/lack of effort" than a difficulty. Unfortunately that was internalized as self criticism.


I hated how some teachers are blind to some kids' crappy behavior. Most kids turn into assholes. Some kids just do it faster than others or are more subtle about it.

I did better on the state tests for math and writing than I did in the ones for reading and science.



TheAllegedlyQuietOne
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01 Jan 2018, 6:28 pm

[quote]"Some kids just do it faster than others or are more subtle about it."[quote]
My observations exactly.

On state tests I was exactly the opposite, great on reading/comprehension, and science (even moreso once I reduced the science test to a set of reading/comprehension problems), about average on mathematics, and poor with writing (don't think it helped that (lack of) hand-eye coordination hit my handwriting quality and speed).



ladyelaine
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01 Jan 2018, 6:59 pm

TheAllegedlyQuietOne wrote:
Quote:
"Some kids just do it faster than others or are more subtle about it."
Quote:

My observations exactly.

On state tests I was exactly the opposite, great on reading/comprehension, and science (even moreso once I reduced the science test to a set of reading/comprehension problems), about average on mathematics, and poor with writing (don't think it helped that (lack of) hand-eye coordination hit my handwriting quality and speed).


My sister was good at science and social studies. She was terrible at math, reading, and writing.



Aristophanes
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01 Jan 2018, 9:14 pm

What sucked about school?
A quarter of my teachers didn't give a s**t about their job, a quarter were morons, a quarter were just teachers because they were control freaks without any ability to exert control over adults so they got into teaching instead. And of course about a quarter were good conscientious teachers that were there for the right reasons, about the breakdown of any demographic really.

Then there's the disruptive students (the attention hogs as the OP titled it in another thread) constantly derailing the lesson. The stupid 'clique' behavior and general 'groupism'. The general apathy towards learning by most of my peers. The constant competitiveness over stuff that doesn't really matter, such as who got first in line, who's the teacher's favorite, all that junk.

Having to be constantly monitored in the chem lab, it's pretty obvious I'm not the type to take science lightly, even at 15 I was known as 'the professor' well before I'd even heard of Asperger's, yet I was the one the teacher was constantly hovering over in lab.

Having to show my 'work' on math problems.

Being constantly bored out of my mind.

The expectation that I would 'cheat' for people to fit in.

Jock behavior.

Attempting to avoid a fight, getting flat out sucker punched instead, and going to the principal who gave me as much detention as the aggressor, reasoning 'you're going to be an adult soon, you need to learn to solve your own problems, that's the lesson here.'

Going back literally a week later, getting punched again, and retaliating by stomping my heel on the kid's ankle, fracturing his tibia and earning me a suspension that go around.

I think a more appropriate question for me would be: what didn't suck about school? Answer: free access to expensive text books and the bell to go home.



TheAllegedlyQuietOne
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02 Jan 2018, 12:13 am

Aristophanes wrote:

I think a more appropriate question for me would be: what didn't suck about school? Answer: free access to expensive text books and the bell to go home.


My school removed the bell for some reason or another :roll: , meaning teachers let us out according to "their own time". It wouldn't have bothered me, except the bus (I had a roughly 25km / 16 mile trip) didn't care about a teacher's watch and left two minutes after scheduled class end, often stranding students leaving class from the far side of campus.



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02 Jan 2018, 12:33 am

Aristophanes wrote:
Answer: free access to expensive text books and the bell to go home.


Text books over here are an absolute rort, I have a book on telecommunications networks which was required reading for a university subject. It cost AU $150. I later discovered, the exact same book, same publisher, sells in the United States for $US 60. The Australian dollar at the time was close to $0.90US.

The latest trend in education is a push toward privately administered standardized testing, which appears designed to sell overpriced texts and study guides to anxious schools and parents. Glad I was out of there well before that trend started.



The Musings Of The Lost
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02 Jan 2018, 7:42 am

ladyelaine wrote:
HistoryGal wrote:
I prefer animals to most people especially the coddled lil people that never pay consequences for their actions.


I'm sick of the special lil people not suffering consequences for their actions.

I HATE these people with a passion.
Once one tried to stab me and he got off without a punishment simply because he family was rich.
I got a suspension and was threatened with expulsion because i kicked him in the stomach and dropped him to the ground to stop him.
Later I told him if he ever tried anything sgain, I would kill him.
He never tried anything


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Aristophanes
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02 Jan 2018, 7:55 am

TheAllegedlyQuietOne wrote:
Aristophanes wrote:

I think a more appropriate question for me would be: what didn't suck about school? Answer: free access to expensive text books and the bell to go home.


My school removed the bell for some reason or another :roll: , meaning teachers let us out according to "their own time". It wouldn't have bothered me, except the bus (I had a roughly 25km / 16 mile trip) didn't care about a teacher's watch and left two minutes after scheduled class end, often stranding students leaving class from the far side of campus.


Wow, that sounds terrible, and borderline negligent, imagine if something would have happened to one of the students stranded by the bus...

TheAllegedlyQuietOne wrote:
Aristophanes wrote:
Answer: free access to expensive text books and the bell to go home.

Text books over here are an absolute rort, I have a book on telecommunications networks which was required reading for a university subject. It cost AU $150. I later discovered, the exact same book, same publisher, sells in the United States for $US 60. The Australian dollar at the time was close to $0.90US.

The latest trend in education is a push toward privately administered standardized testing, which appears designed to sell overpriced texts and study guides to anxious schools and parents. Glad I was out of there well before that trend started.


Yeah, textbooks are just ridiculously marked up, the higher level of education the more expensive they get. The kick is that people writing said textbooks (the people with the actual expertise), make mere pennies on them while the publisher laughs all the way to the bank.