What makes you level 2 instead of level 1 autism?

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Noca
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21 Dec 2017, 9:59 pm

I have tried roughly a dozen or so different jobs and couldnt maintain employment. It would take the absolute best case scenario for me to live independently without supports, not just disability income(I live with my parents at 31 and have been on disability since 2007). I can drive and grocery shop(though unlikely reliably enough to live on my own), maintain a conversation some of the time and struggle socially at other times, I may appear to be higher functioning than I am. I was labeled level 2 after going through the most extensive autism assessment available.

I have a number of chronic illnesses which also impact my ability to function and the supports that I require. I am neither high nor low functioning.


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DSM-V: ASD level 2 with Social Communication Severity: level 2, Restrictive Repetitve Behaviour: level 2

ADOS-2 classification: Autism


Jabberwokky
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22 Dec 2017, 2:09 am

There are levels because there is care on offer and they actually diagnose aspergers. As a kid growing up in the forestry plantations in South Africa, there was zero diagnosis and zero care options. However, the remote places look after strange people like me so i didn't need care. I just ran around being myself. The termites, antelope, meerkats, chickens, dogs, pigs etc didn't care.


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EzraS
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22 Dec 2017, 4:02 am

blooiejagwa wrote:
EzraS wrote:
blooiejagwa wrote:
kraftiekortie wrote:
There's a person here, named Ezra, who was completely nonverbal and non toilet-trained at age 5. But....at about age 8, things blossomed for him (probably through his intensive therapy).

He's 17 now. He's almost nonverbal as far as speech is concerned----but he certainly writes well. He went from Level 3 to Level 2.

I, myself, didn't speak until I was 5 1/2 years old.


Wow really? That’s awesome.
Also I saw your edited post with added tips - i will look into it! Thanks a lot!


My parents have had to go through a lot of stuff with lawyers and fighting insurance companies and all that. They got pretty lucky I guess when it came to doctors and therapists. They also got advice from occupational therapists and read books and stuff to deal with me more effectively.

I had delayed walking also and even after I started walking I still needed to be in a stroller a lot for any kind of long term walking like at a mall because I would fall down too much etc. I was wearing diapers into my teens just in case. Even being toilet trained it's easy to have wetting accidents when level 2/3 autistic.

I didn't quite blossom at 8, but started functioning a little better. It started with acknowledging people and saying the odd one syllable word here and there. And stuff like that gradually improved over the course of a couple of years where I started testing more as level 2 moderate/severe overall.


Thank you for sharing! This gives me hope!! My son also ADORES books though he cannot read he just loves them - I am thinking maybe Reading/Writing can be HIS savant thing too! Thanks and stay rad!


I couldn't read until I was 9/10 and I had to teach myself because I couldn't quite figure it out the (alright) way I was being taught.

Love, support and acceptance have always been the most important things in my development. I have hope for your son because he has you.



SaveFerris
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22 Dec 2017, 5:58 am

EzraS wrote:
SaveFerris wrote:
kraftiekortie wrote:
but he certainly writes well. He went from Level 3 to Level 2.



He certainly does , he writes better than me and I'm level 1 ( I think ) and have 29 years more experience


It's my "savant" thingy. It comes from reading a lot. I'm usually "channeling" whatever author I'm reading, so I wouldn't be surprised if my style of writing changes. But I type slow as hell and rely heavily on spell check.


These are not negatives on a forum so it's Saul Goodman


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magz
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22 Dec 2017, 6:18 am

blooiejagwa wrote:
EzraS wrote:
blooiejagwa wrote:
kraftiekortie wrote:
There's a person here, named Ezra, who was completely nonverbal and non toilet-trained at age 5. But....at about age 8, things blossomed for him (probably through his intensive therapy).

He's 17 now. He's almost nonverbal as far as speech is concerned----but he certainly writes well. He went from Level 3 to Level 2.

I, myself, didn't speak until I was 5 1/2 years old.


Wow really? That’s awesome.
Also I saw your edited post with added tips - i will look into it! Thanks a lot!


My parents have had to go through a lot of stuff with lawyers and fighting insurance companies and all that. They got pretty lucky I guess when it came to doctors and therapists. They also got advice from occupational therapists and read books and stuff to deal with me more effectively.

I had delayed walking also and even after I started walking I still needed to be in a stroller a lot for any kind of long term walking like at a mall because I would fall down too much etc. I was wearing diapers into my teens just in case. Even being toilet trained it's easy to have wetting accidents when level 2/3 autistic.

I didn't quite blossom at 8, but started functioning a little better. It started with acknowledging people and saying the odd one syllable word here and there. And stuff like that gradually improved over the course of a couple of years where I started testing more as level 2 moderate/severe overall.


Thank you for sharing! This gives me hope!! My son also ADORES books though he cannot read he just loves them - I am thinking maybe Reading/Writing can be HIS savant thing too! Thanks and stay rad!

Does he love books?
Maybe you should look at EikonaBridge's ideas of teaching autistic children written English as their first language. I often disagree with him about the philosophy of science but I think he is perfectly right that if a child can't learn to speak, they still may learn other ways of communication. His own kids did.
I think the fingerpainting was a great idea, does he still do it?
Do you draw for him? He may be visual thinker, I guess it is quite common among the nonverbals.
Strapping him was clear abuse!

I'm sorry if you read superiority in my posts, I didn't mean it and don't feel it. TBH, I would be a now stuck somewhere in a mental hospital if it wasn't for some two specialists who could see more than outside symptoms. Because out of the blue I fell from level 0 (doing well without any support) into something more close to what you describe as level 2 when I hit the limits of my coping abilities – and as I had no diagnose of autism, I got the "mentally ill" label and drugs that made it worse :(


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EzraS
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22 Dec 2017, 7:47 am

SaveFerris wrote:
EzraS wrote:
SaveFerris wrote:
kraftiekortie wrote:
but he certainly writes well. He went from Level 3 to Level 2.



He certainly does , he writes better than me and I'm level 1 ( I think ) and have 29 years more experience


It's my "savant" thingy. It comes from reading a lot. I'm usually "channeling" whatever author I'm reading, so I wouldn't be surprised if my style of writing changes. But I type slow as hell and rely heavily on spell check.


These are not negatives on a forum so it's Saul Goodman


I'm surprised I got that. It took a while for the penny to drop :lol:



SaveFerris
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22 Dec 2017, 12:08 pm

EzraS wrote:
SaveFerris wrote:
EzraS wrote:
SaveFerris wrote:
kraftiekortie wrote:
but he certainly writes well. He went from Level 3 to Level 2.



He certainly does , he writes better than me and I'm level 1 ( I think ) and have 29 years more experience


It's my "savant" thingy. It comes from reading a lot. I'm usually "channeling" whatever author I'm reading, so I wouldn't be surprised if my style of writing changes. But I type slow as hell and rely heavily on spell check.


These are not negatives on a forum so it's Saul Goodman


I'm surprised I got that. It took a while for the penny to drop :lol:


I thought about explaining it but that just ruins it , besides I'd thought you'd get it anyway :)


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livingwithautism
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09 Jan 2018, 5:42 pm

I'm level 2, completely dependent on my parents, can't have a real conversation, withdrawn and aloof for starters. I mostly communicate through AAC or texting my parents or caregiver. I will never work, I can't drive, I stim a lot, there's more but that should give you an idea.



CarlM
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10 Nov 2019, 6:16 pm

Amaltheia wrote:
There's also an implicit Level 0 — Requiring No Support
Translation: Ah, they're functional enough. Just throw them out there and let them fend for themselves. And blame anything that happens on their not fitting in. If they just tried harder, they'd be fine


I see you're plenty old enough to have gotten this kind of 'support' as a level 1 child. Sure sounds like my childhood. Not that I was even diagnosed with anything, AFAIK.

I would be interested in learning what level 2s think of the support they got as a child in the 60s and 70s. And were any level 1s placed in special ed with level 2s?


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dragonsanddemons
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10 Nov 2019, 10:36 pm

I consider myself level 2 (diagnosed before there were "levels"), or moderate, because there is a clear difference between me and a lot of high-functioning people. I can't drive or hold a job. I can't even initiate a conversation myself, my selective mutism kicks in until someone else talks to me, and even then speaking is often a challenge. I often partially or completely shut down when in a public place, have trouble identifying when I need to go to the bathroom until it's an emergency, and if left to my own devices, usually will not eat (though I do if food is put in front of me). I'd like to live on my own at some point, but I don't know if that's ever going to be possible.


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EzraS
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11 Nov 2019, 2:56 am

dragonsanddemons wrote:
I consider myself level 2 (diagnosed before there were "levels"), or moderate, because there is a clear difference between me and a lot of high-functioning people. I can't drive or hold a job. I can't even initiate a conversation myself, my selective mutism kicks in until someone else talks to me, and even then speaking is often a challenge. I often partially or completely shut down when in a public place, have trouble identifying when I need to go to the bathroom until it's an emergency, and if left to my own devices, usually will not eat (though I do if food is put in front of me). I'd like to live on my own at some point, but I don't know if that's ever going to be possible.


That sounds level 2 alright.