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ladyelaine
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06 Jan 2018, 9:00 pm

League_Girl wrote:
livingwithautism wrote:
League_Girl wrote:
livingwithautism wrote:
Quote:
It started with Bush, No Child Left Behind.


I don't know why people blame this on Obama. I remember Bush started this. I was in my freshman year of high school when I heard this law and it passed and became affect in 2001. I was even proposed for it then because of kids with disabilities like me and my school tried to abandon me but if it weren't for my AS diagnoses, my school would have just said I had behavior and kick me out of their school and have me be put in a behavior class. We had no child left behind act in 6th grade. I still don't get why this law is an issue. Are they against helping kids with disabilities and learning differences and those who are slow learners?


The irony of the situation is that No Child Left Behind was started to identify students with disabilities to provide services to them. Unfortunately it failed miserably.


Quote:
In what way it failed?

I tried researching this and trying to find reasons people are opposed to it. One psychologist claimed this has lead to more diagnosing on students when in fact these are just ordinary kids and I am like "So it's bad to help these children?" If more kids are visual learners today, why not change the teaching style or are they still in the minority?

What about kids who do have a disability but don't fit in any diagnoses? I wonder how that psychologist feels about it. He also had an old definition of autism and an old fashioned view on it so it made me wonder how many autistic people who are high functioning would he undiagnose. He also said autism diagnoses happens more in the US than in the UK because it's more acceptable to be weird in the UK. I did hear on here how difficult it is to get diagnosed with an ASD in the UK and some members here writing how they can't get diagnosed because they are "too high functioning."


It failed because it used multpile choice standardized testing as a large part of Child Find, also relying on teachers, who aren't child development experts. Therefore missing lots of children. Because you can't find all disabilities on multiple choice tests.


So they are still not seeing disabilities in kids unless they have a behavior or are failing in school if I am understanding correctly. Teachers are not going to notice a thing if the kid doesn't have any behavior and isn't having academic issues so they won't suspect anything and call in the school district to evaluate the child.


That's how it was for me and my sister. Teachers couldn't see our autism because we were good in class and had good grades. It is usually the disruptive kids that get the teachers' attention while the quiet kids get ignored. The other extreme is kids scoring low on the FCAT in spite of having good grades. Some kids are not good test takers. My sister was one of those.



ladyelaine
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06 Jan 2018, 9:03 pm

League_Girl wrote:
ladyelaine wrote:
League_Girl wrote:
ladyelaine wrote:
I think there are classes that should be graduation requirements for all high schoolers. Core academics are important, but so are life skills such as budgeting and driving. I think students should have to take a financial education course, drivers Ed, and sex Ed. Trades courses should be available for students that don't want to do the traditional college route. What do you guys think?



My school did do finances and job interviews and resumes and cover letters and we did politics and cooking and child development. But lot of them were electives was the problem. The only mandatory classes we had were government and consumers and we did document processing, and PE and health class, and driver's ed.

My high school also did careers too so they had woodworking and welding and mechanics and computers and stuff like that. We even did career fair. The career fair was mandatory but the career classes were electives.

Are there really high schools that don't have these courses?



Quote:
It started with Bush, No Child Left Behind.


I don't know why people blame this on Obama. I remember Bush started this. I was in my freshman year of high school when I heard this law and it passed and became affect in 2001. I was even proposed for it then because of kids with disabilities like me and my school tried to abandon me but if it weren't for my AS diagnoses, my school would have just said I had behavior and kick me out of their school and have me be put in a behavior class. We had no child left behind act in 6th grade. I still don't get why this law is an issue. Are they against helping kids with disabilities and learning differences and those who are slow learners?


I think a career class is a good idea too. My old high school used to have a nine week career course that incorporated into other classes. For me and my brother, it was part of the first semester of NJROTC. My sister never took a career class in high school because they didn't make it a requirement anymore once she got to high school. I think a semester long class completely dedicated to careers and the job acquisition process would have been better than cramming the career class into other classes.



I didn't do career courses because I was too focused on life skills I didn't have time for any classes like Drama and art and Spanish. I didn't get to those until my junior year because I had more electives and I do regret not taking more career courses because I didn't get to see what I would be good at. My school offered creative writing too and photography.


I wish my high school would have offered creative writing. I would have taken that in a heart beat.



livingwithautism
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06 Jan 2018, 9:42 pm

ladyelaine wrote:
League_Girl wrote:
livingwithautism wrote:
League_Girl wrote:
livingwithautism wrote:
Quote:
It started with Bush, No Child Left Behind.


I don't know why people blame this on Obama. I remember Bush started this. I was in my freshman year of high school when I heard this law and it passed and became affect in 2001. I was even proposed for it then because of kids with disabilities like me and my school tried to abandon me but if it weren't for my AS diagnoses, my school would have just said I had behavior and kick me out of their school and have me be put in a behavior class. We had no child left behind act in 6th grade. I still don't get why this law is an issue. Are they against helping kids with disabilities and learning differences and those who are slow learners?


The irony of the situation is that No Child Left Behind was started to identify students with disabilities to provide services to them. Unfortunately it failed miserably.


Quote:
In what way it failed?

I tried researching this and trying to find reasons people are opposed to it. One psychologist claimed this has lead to more diagnosing on students when in fact these are just ordinary kids and I am like "So it's bad to help these children?" If more kids are visual learners today, why not change the teaching style or are they still in the minority?

What about kids who do have a disability but don't fit in any diagnoses? I wonder how that psychologist feels about it. He also had an old definition of autism and an old fashioned view on it so it made me wonder how many autistic people who are high functioning would he undiagnose. He also said autism diagnoses happens more in the US than in the UK because it's more acceptable to be weird in the UK. I did hear on here how difficult it is to get diagnosed with an ASD in the UK and some members here writing how they can't get diagnosed because they are "too high functioning."


It failed because it used multpile choice standardized testing as a large part of Child Find, also relying on teachers, who aren't child development experts. Therefore missing lots of children. Because you can't find all disabilities on multiple choice tests.


So they are still not seeing disabilities in kids unless they have a behavior or are failing in school if I am understanding correctly. Teachers are not going to notice a thing if the kid doesn't have any behavior and isn't having academic issues so they won't suspect anything and call in the school district to evaluate the child.


That's how it was for me and my sister. Teachers couldn't see our autism because we were good in class and had good grades. It is usually the disruptive kids that get the teachers' attention while the quiet kids get ignored. The other extreme is kids scoring low on the FCAT in spite of having good grades. Some kids are not good test takers. My sister was one of those.


It's like the saying goes, the squeaky wheel gets the grease.