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Lost_dragon
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15 Jan 2018, 9:12 pm

I don't know how else to put it lol.

Greeting dogs just doesn't seem to come naturally to me.

Some dogs just jump all over you, and I don't know whether they want me to stroke them, or if they are trying to be a tad aggressive.

I am usually at a loss on how to approach the situation.

Sometimes I just end up standing there awkwardly, looking at the owner for guidance on what to do.

Um, is your dog being friendly right now? Should I pet it? Maybe that's what it wants? Or would it attack me if I did that? Where should I pet the dog? Please help me.

In theory it should be simple, I know that dog body language is just the opposite of cat body language, so all I have to do is remember that and adjust accordingly.

Yet, when I am tasked with greeting a dog, I find it hard to read the signals, maybe I overthink these things. But where should I pet the dog? On the head? Side? Maybe I shouldn't pet it at all? :?

With cats I find interaction easy, but with dogs I just... feel awkward I guess.

Not that I dislike dogs, I love dogs and think they are awesome, but sometimes I just don't know how to approach dogs, if that makes sense.


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CloudClimber
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15 Jan 2018, 10:58 pm

Everyone should always ask the owner if it's okay to pet the dog unless you already know the dog. It's kind of like hugging a person. A dog jumping on you is also bad manners. You can turn to your side or completely around until the dog calms down and then pet it. I usually give a little rub behind the ear or, if the dog is leaning against your legs or gives you their backend, then they're normally looking for you to scratch their sides. It's not always simple - not all dogs have "tells" (body signs that show what mood they're in). When in doubt, just ignore it.

https://barkpost.com/dog-body-language-charts/



Tibergrace
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15 Jan 2018, 11:51 pm

I am the opposite. People have often remarked on how their pet who usually hates strangers likes me right off the bat.

I think the trick is to let them approach you, rather than approaching them. I also feel like I'm pretty good at reading their intent and behavior, at least with cats and dogs. Did you have dogs growing up? If not, that might be why you have a hard time reading dog behavior.



hale_bopp
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16 Jan 2018, 2:24 am

Animals love me because I love them, but I completely get what you’re saying. Because I never grew up with dogs, I got used to cats only, and the largeness, exciteableness, loudness, the fact they don’t self clean and force of dogs sometimes startles me because I’m not used to it.



kraftiekortie
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16 Jan 2018, 10:12 am

I used to be afraid of dogs. I'm better now---but I'm pretty "socially inept" with them.

I do better with cats. Meow and purr.....

Despite the fact that I am the Wolfman.....



Trogluddite
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16 Jan 2018, 3:04 pm

I think that part of what can make dogs trickier than many other pets is that more of their behaviour is determined by their owner. Humans have bred dogs and co-opted their social instincts so that we're able to train them. With some breeds, you could take two puppies from the same litter and train one to be an aggressive guard dog, and the other to be a companion animal for a disabled person. In short, dogs are more unpredictable because humans are more unpredictable!


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