How to best prepare for assessment

Page 1 of 1 [ 4 posts ] 

elsapelsa
Veteran
Veteran

User avatar

Joined: 23 Dec 2017
Gender: Female
Posts: 840

19 Jan 2018, 5:05 am

Just wondering if anyone can give me some ideas on how to best prepare information for assessment. There will be a long developmental history interview with us (parents) and a bunch of observations / assessments of my daughter. I am wondering about the developmental history - I don't want to miss things out. Can anyone share some good ideas of how to best catalogue information?


_________________
"I will file you under "L" for people I love most. "


ASDMommyASDKid
Veteran
Veteran

User avatar

Joined: 27 Oct 2011
Gender: Female
Posts: 3,786

19 Jan 2018, 8:31 am

Our assessments were a series of parental questionnaires plus the observations and tests they did of my son.

The hardest of it is that a lot of the questions were things like how does son do x skill: rate it 1-5. As a non-expert, i found these incredibly difficult.

For the history part, maybe try to think of your daughter's life in very small stages and think about the things that stand out as being unusual at the time or that stand out now as being so.

I honestly did zero prep for hours but I ended up writing comments for clarification all throughout the thing and so they probably thought I was a loon. :D



elsapelsa
Veteran
Veteran

User avatar

Joined: 23 Dec 2017
Gender: Female
Posts: 840

19 Jan 2018, 9:02 am

Thanks.

I am at risk of over- preparing and coming across as a complete loon :oops:

Going over all the photos and videos I have I am aware of a lot of behaviour which may or not fit with "lining up" however, I would more describe it as "setting up" - spending a lot of time setting up a "scene" either a picnic with playfood or a scene from a movie or just getting loads of toys and categorising them across the floor. The picnic example took about 2 hrs to set up and is extremely elaborate. Also, she had her bedside table so particularly organised at 4-5 years old that I would have to photograph it before I dusted it and hoovered so I was able to put it back together the same way. Do you think stuff like that is relevant?

I know it is not going to hinge on a tiny little thing I forget or remember but feels very precious to get them the right information now we finally have this chance for an accurate diagnosis.


_________________
"I will file you under "L" for people I love most. "


ASDMommyASDKid
Veteran
Veteran

User avatar

Joined: 27 Oct 2011
Gender: Female
Posts: 3,786

19 Jan 2018, 11:20 am

A lot of what you describe here and elsewhere to me seems like it is in the OCD family. OCD is a co-morbid for autism, so I suspect it would be relevant. In any event, i think if they know here issues, it will help them see what she needs.