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fluffysaurus
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01 Feb 2018, 3:20 pm

Temeraire wrote:
fluffysaurus wrote:
kraftiekortie wrote:
I believe one has to wear vaguely "hip hip" sorts of clothes, in addition to the other characteristics mentioned, to be truly a "chav" in the UK.

Is that different to ''hip hop''?
chav's were more pink velvet tracky bottoms (females). It's been a while since I herd anyone use the term but I would expect a chav today would be trying to look like someone off TOWIE.


It would seem I am a chav in the older sense - I love my velvet tracky bottoms.
I cherish all my tracky bottoms.
I also live in an ex-council house and was brought up on council estates.
I speak with a chav accent too.
I guess I am proud to be an old chav.
I do not in any way pertain to the new wave of chav definitions - purely old school chav. :pirat:

:P :P :P



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02 Feb 2018, 4:27 pm

Joe90 wrote:
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I know I could just google it but I dont feel like it right now


That is not really the right attitude. Us Brits are a minority on WP, and personally I get tired of keep having to Americanize everything for the Americans to understand. If you don't understand what a British word means, it'd be better, and quicker, to just Google it, rather than take the time to start a whole thread about it just because you 'don't feel like Googling something' or 'can't be bothered'.

I understand Americans more than they understand us because I watch a lot of American films and cartoons.


I'm sorry this thread upset you. If you'd like to know the meaning of any Americanisms, I'd be happy to chat about it.


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02 Feb 2018, 4:31 pm

fluffysaurus wrote:
Joe90 wrote:
Quote:
I know I could just google it but I dont feel like it right now


That is not really the right attitude. Us Brits are a minority on WP, and personally I get tired of keep having to Americanize everything for the Americans to understand. If you don't understand what a British word means, it'd be better, and quicker, to just Google it, rather than take the time to start a whole thread about it just because you 'don't feel like Googling something' or 'can't be bothered'.

I understand Americans more than they understand us because I watch a lot of American films and cartoons.

I think what the OP meant is that she wanted a more human response than she would get from Google, particularly with one question leading to another.

The spelling thing annoys the s**t out of me, you know, like when Brits spell Americanise with a z because the spell check told them to :D


Thank you Fluffy. I love chatting with people from overseas and its mostly little differences that interest me. Like what do Japanese people put on McDonalds fries for example? In the US most folks only put Catsup, but I know that's not the case world wide.


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"It must be understood, that neither by word nor deed had I given Fortunato cause to doubt my good-will. I continued as was my wont, to smile in his face, and he did not perceive that my smile was at the thought of his immolation."

Edgar Allan Poe, The Cask of Amontillado


fluffysaurus
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02 Feb 2018, 4:35 pm

RainbowUnion wrote:
fluffysaurus wrote:
Joe90 wrote:
Quote:
I know I could just google it but I dont feel like it right now


That is not really the right attitude. Us Brits are a minority on WP, and personally I get tired of keep having to Americanize everything for the Americans to understand. If you don't understand what a British word means, it'd be better, and quicker, to just Google it, rather than take the time to start a whole thread about it just because you 'don't feel like Googling something' or 'can't be bothered'.

I understand Americans more than they understand us because I watch a lot of American films and cartoons.

I think what the OP meant is that she wanted a more human response than she would get from Google, particularly with one question leading to another.

The spelling thing annoys the s**t out of me, you know, like when Brits spell Americanise with a z because the spell check told them to :D


Thank you Fluffy. I love chatting with people from overseas and its mostly little differences that interest me. Like what do Japanese people put on McDonalds fries for example? In the US most folks only put Catsup, but I know that's not the case world wide.
We have ketchup. We are probably imagining them having wasabi on their fries and they are probably having ketchup too :D .



PhosphorusDecree
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02 Feb 2018, 4:48 pm

DarthMetaKnight wrote:
I'm pretty sure that "gypsy" is a slur.


So's "Chav." It is NEVER used positively. Unfortunately, people can get away with class-based hatred in this country.

I spent 2004 out of Britain and came back to discover two new words in circulation: "chav" and "twerk." Linguistic drift, you suck.


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kraftiekortie
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02 Feb 2018, 5:28 pm

Most people call "catsup" "ketchup" here in the US.



naturalplastic
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02 Feb 2018, 5:37 pm

PhosphorusDecree wrote:
DarthMetaKnight wrote:
I'm pretty sure that "gypsy" is a slur.


So's "Chav." It is NEVER used positively. Unfortunately, people can get away with class-based hatred in this country.

I spent 2004 out of Britain and came back to discover two new words in circulation: "chav" and "twerk." Linguistic drift, you suck.



We have "twerking" here in the states too. We had the thing first (the dance move) years before I ever heard the term for it though.



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03 Feb 2018, 1:02 am

PhosphorusDecree wrote:
So's "Chav." It is NEVER used positively.


Not true.

There are areas in the UK where "Chav" is used in the context derived from the Romany "chavi" (young man or child) to denote familiarity or friendship with the subject.

"Alright chav(i), how ya doin?"

There are other Romany words found commonly in certain dialects, such as Gadjo/Gadji, Chor (pronounced chure) and Cushty (as popularised by Only Fools and Horses).



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03 Feb 2018, 5:12 am

Chav was an early 2000's casual slur against young, unintelligent folk who tried to glamorise a certain street/urban culture but to everyone on the outside it just looked cheap, fake & quite laughable.

I would not attach 'criminal' to chavs at all, they are more people who want to act a bit threatening by hanging around on street corners in gangs but in general they are youngsters who are not brave/big time enough to actually do anything.

Through a lack of money and resource their clothing is often cheap imitation high street designer, full tracksuits and cheap jewellery on show.

Also 'gypsy' is not a slur in the UK at all. That is the term used by gypsies a lot to describe themselves, although round my way 'travellers' is more common. See boxing heavyweight champion Tyson Fury, he refers to himself as 'King Gypsy'. I live just down the road from a large traveller site and there is another 4 miles away, I went to school with a load of them and see them around here all the time. My next door neighbours are gypsies as the local site is having work done on it and the council have moved them out until the summer.

The derogatory term for them is 'pikies'. That is a word casually thrown around by everyone else to describe them but you would never ever utter it in front of them.



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03 Feb 2018, 5:26 am

RainbowUnion wrote:
Well thanks for enlightening an ignorant Yank. Now can someone explain to me the rules of Cricket? Also I'm wondering why Canadians don't play the game when all the other parts of the world with heavy Brit influence (Australia, India, Pakistan, etc) do.


I love cricket! The amount of stats involved and how much you follow it as a long strategy game is just fantastic. Keep in mind as well that cricket can be enjoyed while not actually watching any action, it goes on for days and you just keep a track of how the scoring is going. I have a score counter in the corner of my work screen when matches are on so I know what is happening.

When you get it, it is a great game to follow.

I am more than happy to explain how it works if you are serious. It's really not actually very complicated, it can be as simple as you want it to be to your own level of enthusiasm and enjoyment.

And Canada do play cricket! They are just not very good at it.



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03 Feb 2018, 8:29 am

Biscuitman wrote:
Chav was an early 2000's casual slur against young, unintelligent folk who tried to glamorise a certain street/urban culture but to everyone on the outside it just looked cheap, fake & quite laughable.

I would not attach 'criminal' to chavs at all, they are more people who want to act a bit threatening by hanging around on street corners in gangs but in general they are youngsters who are not brave/big time enough to actually do anything.

Through a lack of money and resource their clothing is often cheap imitation high street designer, full tracksuits and cheap jewellery on show.

Also 'gypsy' is not a slur in the UK at all. That is the term used by gypsies a lot to describe themselves, although round my way 'travellers' is more common. See boxing heavyweight champion Tyson Fury, he refers to himself as 'King Gypsy'. I live just down the road from a large traveller site and there is another 4 miles away, I went to school with a load of them and see them around here all the time. My next door neighbours are gypsies as the local site is having work done on it and the council have moved them out until the summer.

The derogatory term for them is 'pikies'. That is a word casually thrown around by everyone else to describe them but you would never ever utter it in front of them.


Although Travellers do now seem to refer to themselves as Gypsies,
the word Gypsy always used to refer to the Romani.

Quote:
Roma (Gypsies) originated in the Punjab region of northern India as a nomadic people and entered Europe between the eighth and tenth centuries C.E. They were called "Gypsies" because Europeans mistakenly believed they came from Egypt. This minority is made up of distinct groups called "tribes" or "nations.".


The derogatory term was a Gyppo.

Quote:
Gippo

Alternative forms
Gyppo

Etymology
An alteration of gypsy, which is in turn an alteration of Egyptian.

Noun
gippo (plural gippos or gippoes)

(Britain, offensive, slang) A Gypsy.
(Britain, offensive, slang, rare) An Egyptian.



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06 Feb 2018, 4:54 pm

Biscuitman wrote:
RainbowUnion wrote:
Well thanks for enlightening an ignorant Yank. Now can someone explain to me the rules of Cricket? Also I'm wondering why Canadians don't play the game when all the other parts of the world with heavy Brit influence (Australia, India, Pakistan, etc) do.


I love cricket! The amount of stats involved and how much you follow it as a long strategy game is just fantastic. Keep in mind as well that cricket can be enjoyed while not actually watching any action, it goes on for days and you just keep a track of how the scoring is going. I have a score counter in the corner of my work screen when matches are on so I know what is happening.

When you get it, it is a great game to follow.

I am more than happy to explain how it works if you are serious. It's really not actually very complicated, it can be as simple as you want it to be to your own level of enthusiasm and enjoyment.

And Canada do play cricket! They are just not very good at it.


Hello sir. I am serious. First off, I am wondering how you decide when the game is over because there is apparently no time limit. Also how do you score and what happens in a typical play.


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"It must be understood, that neither by word nor deed had I given Fortunato cause to doubt my good-will. I continued as was my wont, to smile in his face, and he did not perceive that my smile was at the thought of his immolation."

Edgar Allan Poe, The Cask of Amontillado


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06 Feb 2018, 6:57 pm

I think it has something to do, sometimes, with something called "overs." Once you complete a certain amount of "overs," the game is over.

Then I'm thinking---some of the longer matches are not over until everybody on the respective cricket team has made an "out."



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06 Feb 2018, 11:13 pm

RainbowUnion wrote:
First off, I am wondering how you decide when the game is over because there is apparently no time limit.


Test cricket (international professional cricket) these days has a time limit of 5 days of 6 hours play each (with some wiggle room). The game is over either when both teams have completed their time batting (by losing all their batters or by declaring the innings over) or the time limit has been reached. In the first case, the team with the highest score wins. In the second case, there is no winner and the game is an automatic draw, regardless of score.
Edit: forgot to mention test cricket usually schedules four innings during that 5 day limit, each team gets two turns batting and bowling, essentially two games of cricket amalgamated into one, with the cumulative score counting for the match as a whole. Same rules apply though.

You can play timeless cricket if you want, it used to be normal I understand, but that is rare these days. In that case the game doesn't end until all batters are out or both sides have declared and there is always a winner.

RainbowUnion wrote:
Also how do you score and what happens in a typical play.


There are quite a few eccentricities but:
Scoring - short answer: as batter you hit the ball (usually), then you and your batting partner run to each other's respective wicket (or more specifically the lined zone around the wickets) before the field team can retrieve the ball and smash it into your wicket (being run out). Each successful traversal between the two wickets is one run. The batters have to judge whether they can risk a run before the field team can run them out.

See this video below for an odd example. Batter gives the ball a good hit, they score 4 runs, the fielder who retrieves the ball throws it towards the wicket, but the keeper misses the ball (either that or it was a bad throw, hard to tell), the ball runs off into the field again, so the batters keep running, scoring a very unusual 7 runs off one ball.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QtOi69xx03o

If the batter hits the ball hard enough and it crosses the outer boundary without hitting the ground that's a six (automatic six runs - no need for the batters to do the actual running, they saunter back to their wickets), if the ball hits the ground before crossing the boundary and bounces over it, that's a four (automatic four runs).

A typical play is a more amusing question. In high stakes first class cricket, with good batsmen facing off good bowlers and a good field team, a typical play is probably the batter playing it safe. The bowler bowls, the batter intercepts the ball (to prevent the ball from hitting the wicket - being bowled out) with his bat at an angle to ensure the ball hits the ground (so the field team can't catch it - being caught out), the ball patters along the ground, the field team pick it up quickly, too quickly for the batters to attempt a run, so no runs are scored in that play.


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07 Feb 2018, 1:34 am

kraftiekortie wrote:
I think it has something to do, sometimes, with something called "overs." Once you complete a certain amount of "overs," the game is over.


There are games limited by overs too yes, but the rules can be slightly different, with restrictions on the number of overs any one bowler can bowl in one day internationals. High score still wins, ties are possible, but not draws I think, as in time limited games, unless something very strange happens. In shorter 20-over games, ties are not possible, because a method of settling them was invented.

Folks might enjoy this set of short videos exploring some of the more esoteric rules, I didn't know half of these. Narrated by Stephen Fry!

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=uQ_aQXo ... Ly4YRjDEYz


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And know the place for the first time.