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Alexinwonderland
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29 Jan 2018, 9:36 pm

To me personally, it feels like employers really don't want to hire job seekers on the autistic spectrum. They will hire people with physical disabilities but not mental. For example, I have been rejected after attdending two job interviews in the last two weeks but my wife's friend who has sight problems was accepted for a job working in a children's hospice. I am happy for my wife's friend and as far as I know she hasn't struggled to find work, she's been bullied a bit which is awful but never by management.

My last job interviews have involved being observed for about 20 or 30 minutes which is terrifying for those without autism, but for those with autism it is much worse for us, but I don't think I did terribly bad in those interviews. I did have some confidence and maintained eye contact and engaged with people, yet I keep being rejected by employers and the pay for these jobs is not all that great either yet just make you jump through hoops. If your face doesn't fit they don't wanna know. I really wish that employers see us as the honest, passionate and dedicated people that we are, rather than a nuisance they don't want to risk hiring. Does anyone else feel like autism is the ultimate disability employers discriminate against?



kraftiekortie
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29 Jan 2018, 11:47 pm

What sort of job has interviewers observing you for 30 minutes?

I’ve never experienced this. I’m guessing it’s for some really professional-type job.

Yep....never mention that you have a disability before being offered the job.



Fireblossom
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30 Jan 2018, 4:44 am

I think that the reason many of us struggle to get a job is that we just don't send and/or catch all the social vibes that average people do and expect. I don't think that the employers are actually discriminating us on purpose, they just get an "off" feeling about us that makes us worse options compared to other people... I mean if I had a business of my own I'd certainly hesitate hiring someone who made me uncomfortable or gave some kind of bad vibe even if the person was a professional on paper.



Dear_one
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30 Jan 2018, 4:58 am

More the other way around for me. I didn't want a job, I wanted to create my own company.



Disconaut
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30 Jan 2018, 9:32 am

I disclosed to an employer ONCE about my diagnosis. Never again. She immediately started treating me different. She slowed her speech to talk to me, for one, as well as:

-being shocked when I dyed my hair (?)
-being shocked when I did my makeup nicely (??)
-being shocked and condescending when I got a boyfriend (???)
-acting like it was ASD that made my till that ran on Windows 95 not work. I remember her being like "computers are hard sometimes!" I was pretty fed up so I was like "No, Trish, computers that were obsolete by the time I was six shouldn't be used in a retail setting"



AntisocialButterfly
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30 Jan 2018, 10:03 am

Disconaut wrote:
I disclosed to an employer ONCE about my diagnosis. Never again. She immediately started treating me different. She slowed her speech to talk to me, for one, as well as:

-being shocked when I dyed my hair (?)
-being shocked when I did my makeup nicely (??)
-being shocked and condescending when I got a boyfriend (???)
-acting like it was ASD that made my till that ran on Windows 95 not work. I remember her being like "computers are hard sometimes!" I was pretty fed up so I was like "No, Trish, computers that were obsolete by the time I was six shouldn't be used in a retail setting"


Ahahahha that last bit really made me laugh!

But also very true, this is why I haven't disclosed it to work at all. I have told them I have PTSD as that affected work at one stage, but they are pretty relaxed and that was fine. I don't want to tell them about the ASD though because people start to see the way my brain works as a permanent disability. Its different, I am not incapable. I mean thankfully I work in IT so there is a lot of forgiveness for social mistakes, I know I didn't do very well in a retail setting.



XenoMind
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30 Jan 2018, 11:52 am

kraftiekortie wrote:
What sort of job has interviewers observing you for 30 minutes?
I’ve never experienced this. I’m guessing it’s for some really professional-type job.
Yep....never mention that you have a disability before being offered the job.

Only 30 minutes? Many IT companies hold interviews for many hours in a row, sometimes a full day.



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30 Jan 2018, 12:02 pm

I work at a place that offers social work services for people with disabilities, and one of its operating requirements is that it has a minimum 50% of staff with disabilities. I play my autism up and show how it can be a strength during interviews, because I can't hide it during the interview, and I want to be clear with employers about the "weird vibe" they may be getting when I look past them instead of at them, or take longer to respond to questions.


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XenoMind
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30 Jan 2018, 12:03 pm

Fireblossom wrote:
I mean if I had a business of my own I'd certainly hesitate hiring someone who made me uncomfortable or gave some kind of bad vibe even if the person was a professional on paper.

Something went seriously off with our society when people started thinking that being a nice guy is more important than being a good professional.



Dear_one
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30 Jan 2018, 12:12 pm

XenoMind wrote:
Something went seriously off with our society when people started thinking that being a nice guy is more important than being a good professional.


I think the trouble is with our species. When Tasmania was cut off from Australia, the smaller population could not even maintain the technology to stay warm.



XenoMind
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30 Jan 2018, 12:16 pm

StarTrekker wrote:
I work at a place that offers social work services for people with disabilities, and one of its operating requirements is that it has a minimum 50% of staff with disabilities. I play my autism up and show how it can be a strength during interviews, because I can't hide it during the interview, and I want to be clear with employers about the "weird vibe" they may be getting when I look past them instead of at them, or take longer to respond to questions.

I wonder what company is that.



XenoMind
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30 Jan 2018, 12:19 pm

Dear_one wrote:
I think the trouble is with our species. When Tasmania was cut off from Australia, the smaller population could not even maintain the technology to stay warm.

I don't really have any idea what you mean.



Dear_one
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30 Jan 2018, 12:28 pm

XenoMind wrote:
Dear_one wrote:
I think the trouble is with our species. When Tasmania was cut off from Australia, the smaller population could not even maintain the technology to stay warm.

I don't really have any idea what you mean.

People who can do their jobs well are very rare, and often overruled, as they can put a lot of dummies out of work. Various populations have also starved to death rather than eat food forbidden by their culture, which is perpetuated by "nice people."



XenoMind
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30 Jan 2018, 12:59 pm

Dear_one wrote:
People who can do their jobs well are very rare, and often overruled, as they can put a lot of dummies out of work. Various populations have also starved to death rather than eat food forbidden by their culture, which is perpetuated by "nice people."

Ah. Agreed, then.



StarTrekker
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30 Jan 2018, 1:08 pm

XenoMind wrote:
StarTrekker wrote:
I work at a place that offers social work services for people with disabilities, and one of its operating requirements is that it has a minimum 50% of staff with disabilities. I play my autism up and show how it can be a strength during interviews, because I can't hide it during the interview, and I want to be clear with employers about the "weird vibe" they may be getting when I look past them instead of at them, or take longer to respond to questions.

I wonder what company is that.


It's a nonprofit organization; we aren't very big, we have one satellite office and a total of about thirteen employees.


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Diagnosed with ASD level 1 on the 10th of April, 2014
Rediagnosed with ASD level 2 on the 4th of May, 2019
Thanks to Olympiadis for my fantastic avatar!