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1986
Blue Jay
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25 Apr 2018, 4:04 am

Trump is an opportunist par excellence. He will twist and turn everything, manipulate and distort people and facts to no end to get his way through. That's a kind of talent he has, if one is to play devil's advocate. Such talent makes him seem "lucky". On the other hand, he was also born rich. That's a kind of luck nobody can argue against.

In any case, as for successful people with ASD, my two cents is that it comes down to a certain "will to cope socially" as much as brute IQ. I'm not successful by any means but I hold a job and I'm married. I don't think my job is technically difficult (it's mostly boring), but socially, it takes a great toll on me to work in a team all day. When the day is over, I have to go home and chat and pay attention to my significant other. I've been tired for more than a decade now, but it's not a tiredness that can be treated (like for social anxiety disorder) so I'm left to simply live with it and enjoy a certain pride in being an integral part of a wider social circle, even if that pride is mostly intellectual.



blazingstar
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25 Apr 2018, 6:38 pm

auntblabby wrote:
it seems only the highest-functioning in our community can say that they "made their luck" and ordered their environment to fit themselves, that they always had a plan and perfectly executed it, no "falling into good fortune" for them. but it has been my experience that those sorts of people also tend to be somewhat self-righteous ("I got mine, so screw you!") and unwilling to consider their aspie brothers who struggle - I call this "the clarence thomas syndrome."


I think there is a tendency for all people who are doing well to believe it is due to their own inherent worthiness, intelligence, etc. and that it is the "fault" of others if they are not successful. These are institutionalized delusions, at least in USA.

The challenge is to not let that delusion spoil your own life. Just my 2c


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auntblabby
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25 Apr 2018, 6:48 pm

ancient Chinese saying, "it's as hard for a rich man to not brag, as it is for a poor man to not complain."



justRob
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25 Apr 2018, 7:21 pm

1986 wrote:
In any case, as for successful people with ASD, my two cents is that it comes down to a certain "will to cope socially" as much as brute IQ. I'm not successful by any means but I hold a job and I'm married. I don't think my job is technically difficult (it's mostly boring), but socially, it takes a great toll on me to work in a team all day. When the day is over, I have to go home and chat and pay attention to my significant other. I've been tired for more than a decade now, but it's not a tiredness that can be treated (like for social anxiety disorder) so I'm left to simply live with it and enjoy a certain pride in being an integral part of a wider social circle, even if that pride is mostly intellectual.


To me, this "will to cope socially" is the will to work hard and suffer day after day, and keep coming back for more, year after year, with no real end in sight... and the willingness to fake your way through anything to get by. All for the opportunity to be a "normal" part of society, with friends and a decent job and a partner. And if I had to point to one thing that's gotten me these things, it would be that "will".

Also big contributors: supportive (if not understanding) parents, a decent IQ, being a white "normal" looking male, and a lot of luck & opportunities. It's a s***** world where success for those on the spectrum comes mostly for those lucky enough to have so many things fall into place and willing to give up so much of their selves and identities to adapt to their environment.



auntblabby
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25 Apr 2018, 7:28 pm

"a decent IQ" is IMHO an unfortunate phrase to use in this forum.



AlanMooresBeard
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26 Apr 2018, 12:23 pm

I'm a records manager in the public sector. My job involves reviewing records to determine if they are still useful to my organisation and decide whether to retain or dispose of information. It can be a bit tricky at times to make decisions but my manager is very supportive and is pleased with how I'm doing so I do consider myself to be fairly competent in my job.



madcats1967
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26 Apr 2018, 12:46 pm

I have a none existing one.


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justRob
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26 Apr 2018, 5:02 pm

auntblabby wrote:
"a decent IQ" is IMHO an unfortunate phrase to use in this forum.


I apologize for the word choice. Looking back, I wanted to echo the phrase "high IQ" that's been used but then I felt arrogant saying that, and more than a little dishonest, because (like everyone) my intelligences are specific and I have a lot of areas where my mind struggle, that others find easy. I guess what I wanted to say is I was lucky to have specific intelligences that have helped me learn effective people skills, although it's taken till my 30's ti really integrate things.

To the original post, though: I'm a systems engineer in the aerospace industry. I do a lot of requirements management and spend a lot of time in databases and doing technical writing. It's exhausting on a day to day basis, like most any job I suppose, but I have an easy going boss right now and feel really fortunate to be in this position, while it lasts (before the program ends in a year or so, and it's off to a new team).



Glflegolas
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01 May 2018, 8:39 am

Organic chemist, teaching assistant for the undergraduate organic labs.


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Dianawelz
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03 May 2018, 2:28 am

I am a Web Designer