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Heretic6
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24 Apr 2018, 1:54 pm

I'm a Database and Systems administrator for an engineering firm.
Which means I sit in front of a computer with headphones on most days :D

eeVenye wrote:
Still in school, but hoping to be a priest. (yes, really!)


I've worked with some priests before (set up some networking in their church), it seems to be a rewarding career/life style.


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Zymologist
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24 Apr 2018, 2:08 pm

Electrical engineer working in renewable energy as a consultant.

Which basically just means I always have multiple deadlines to meet, all of which are ASAP, and each of which is more urgent than the others.



Flown
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24 Apr 2018, 2:37 pm

Anthracite_Impreza wrote:
Flown wrote:
Anthracite_Impreza wrote:
Part time snail wrangler and professional scrounger xD


You've piqued my interest! Do you study gastropods?

Not in any official capacity, but as a result of having pet C. nemoralis I've become quite an expert in them xD


Awesome! I'm a newbie when it comes to gastropods, but I absolutely fell in love with Stenotrema barbigerum when I found it on our land this past summer! It is a globally vulnerable species!



Flown
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24 Apr 2018, 2:37 pm

Zymologist wrote:
Electrical engineer working in renewable energy as a consultant.

Which basically just means I always have multiple deadlines to meet, all of which are ASAP, and each of which is more urgent than the others.


That sounds really stressful but interesting!



auntblabby
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24 Apr 2018, 3:15 pm

aside from sheer brute force IQ, I wonder what separates the high-paid professionally successful aspies here from the rest? :scratch:



Mr. Vague
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24 Apr 2018, 3:26 pm

I’m a furniture and flooring sales consultant. It’s pretty easy really and pays the bills!

If you’d like to know carpet pile density per sq mm or fibre weight per sq mm on my carpets I can tell ya. Nobody actually cares tbh lol.



auntblabby
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24 Apr 2018, 8:26 pm

^^^god bless you Mr. V. :star: and welcome to WP 8)



blazingstar
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24 Apr 2018, 8:57 pm

Flown wrote:
I don't have an "official" job title, but I consider myself a naturalist, conservationist, and biologist. I spend most of my time outdoors (in the forest or other natural habitats). I am most fascinated by fungi and plants, but I honestly love learning about anything in nature. I spend most of my hikes log flipping, scouring leaf litter for emerging fruiting bodies, and looking for native flora.


This ^^^ is what I tried to be and could not get work or the right opportunities. Grew up in a time when women "in the field" were rare and those who got jobs rarer still. My degrees are in botany and mycology. I still flip over logs :-)

Carolina Jessamine, right? That's what made me notice your post. Feel free to PM me anytime you want to talk plants or fungi. :-)

Back to the main thread. I have ended up the past 20 years working as an advocate for services for people with developmental disabilities and it is my own business - social work was privatized in my state - so I can work from "home" and set my own hours, which has made this possible. I now have five people who work with me. In the past I have taught college and also have been a hospice nurse.


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blazingstar
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24 Apr 2018, 9:04 pm

auntblabby wrote:
aside from sheer brute force IQ, I wonder what separates the high-paid professionally successful aspies here from the rest? :scratch:


I think it has a lot to do with luck. Malcolm Gladwell's book on outliers explains the phenomenon better than I can. Right place, right time - things we have no control over have more to do with "success" as defined by career and pay levels than anything we have control over.


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Eyes that watch the morning star
usually shine brighter,
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usually hold tighter.


Threnody, Dorothy Parker
as modified by David Tamulovich


auntblabby
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24 Apr 2018, 9:07 pm

blazingstar wrote:
auntblabby wrote:
aside from sheer brute force IQ, I wonder what separates the high-paid professionally successful aspies here from the rest? :scratch:


I think it has a lot to do with luck. Malcolm Gladwell's book on outliers explains the phenomenon better than I can. Right place, right time - things we have no control over have more to do with "success" as defined by career and pay levels than anything we have control over.

seems 90% of success in life in general, is due to luck. there is an old saying about how it is not enough to have the luck of talent, one must also have a talent for luck.



cberg
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24 Apr 2018, 9:13 pm

Last year database administrator & now a software test engineer in some startups.


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Heretic6
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24 Apr 2018, 9:31 pm

auntblabby wrote:
blazingstar wrote:
auntblabby wrote:
aside from sheer brute force IQ, I wonder what separates the high-paid professionally successful aspies here from the rest? :scratch:


I think it has a lot to do with luck. Malcolm Gladwell's book on outliers explains the phenomenon better than I can. Right place, right time - things we have no control over have more to do with "success" as defined by career and pay levels than anything we have control over.

seems 90% of success in life in general, is due to luck. there is an old saying about how it is not enough to have the luck of talent, one must also have a talent for luck.


I would agree with this.
I "fell" into my line of work by being in the right place at the right time. Working in a call center of all places. I was way out of the norm of people working there, and had a great manager that took a chance on me.


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auntblabby
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24 Apr 2018, 9:43 pm

it seems only the highest-functioning in our community can say that they "made their luck" and ordered their environment to fit themselves, that they always had a plan and perfectly executed it, no "falling into good fortune" for them. but it has been my experience that those sorts of people also tend to be somewhat self-righteous ("I got mine, so screw you!") and unwilling to consider their aspie brothers who struggle - I call this "the clarence thomas syndrome."



1986
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24 Apr 2018, 10:42 pm

Quote:
I got mine, so screw you!

That's just childishness based on a previous sense of inferiority complex, which their small-to-medium success has ostensibly come to negate. Don't mind people like that.

"Luck" is an important factor, if we think of it as a fortunate environment of chain of events out of one's control, but to benefit from luck you have to have a knack for putting yourself in such environments, and responding to such events.



auntblabby
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24 Apr 2018, 11:28 pm

1986 wrote:
Quote:
I got mine, so screw you!

That's just childishness based on a previous sense of inferiority complex, which their small-to-medium success has ostensibly come to negate. Don't mind people like that.

"Luck" is an important factor, if we think of it as a fortunate environment of chain of events out of one's control, but to benefit from luck you have to have a knack for putting yourself in such environments, and responding to such events.

the talent for luck outranks the luck of talent every time, just look at who is POTUS now for proof of that.