Page 1 of 2 [ 26 posts ]  Go to page 1, 2  Next

Sweetleaf
Veteran
Veteran

User avatar

Joined: 6 Jan 2011
Gender: Female
Posts: 30,235
Location: Somewhere in Colorado

01 May 2018, 3:42 pm

I've thought about looking into it before, but haven't really bothered...but from what I understand it might be a better experience than windows 10 basically I am not seeing many good reasons not to look into it. I guess my concern is what I would do if I end up not liking it, I would certainly want to try it out first without replacing the windows 10...as not sure how easy it would be to re-install windows 10 if I removed it and wanted it back. Obviously I'll need to do some more in depth research before I do anything to my computer but I am seriously considering it. I have certainly never really switched operating systems, and am certainly very much used to windows. But I understand linux has some more user friendly versions currently, whereas in the past I have worried it would be too complicated which is another reason I didn't really consider it before.


_________________
Welcome to hell, this is the end.


Sweetleaf
Veteran
Veteran

User avatar

Joined: 6 Jan 2011
Gender: Female
Posts: 30,235
Location: Somewhere in Colorado

01 May 2018, 5:10 pm

Well I found one that looks good, called Deepin however seems like actually installing it would be a little complicated, so trying to find good instructions on how to do it without screwing anything up. Was hoping I could just click install and it does everything, but seems like I have to somehow put the file on a USB drive, and then not sure how I would keep from deleting windows 10. Not sure it gives a specific option to add it in addition to the windows, or if it would just automatically delete and replace it.

I don't suppose anyone here knows about installing operating systems. Also, not sure that would be the best one just seems like it would be simple enough to use and also visually appealing.


_________________
Welcome to hell, this is the end.


AstroPi
Snowy Owl
Snowy Owl

User avatar

Joined: 28 Apr 2018
Age: 40
Gender: Male
Posts: 148
Location: Poland

02 May 2018, 1:56 am

I think you should try some more popular distro, like linux Mint or some flavour of Ubuntu, you will find help with installing it more easily. Everything depends on what hardware you have, if you have SecureBoot or not, if you have a backup partition for reinstalling Windows etc. Definitely look is not a good criterium for choosing particular linux, because you can change it to almost anything later. You should look for help on the distro forums, if you have troubles with that I can help you (well, at least I can try ;) ). If you don't want to write your computer specs in the open you can PM me.


_________________
Back to nonverbal.


MisterSpock
Veteran
Veteran

User avatar

Joined: 17 Jan 2012
Gender: Male
Posts: 572
Location: Manchester, UK

02 May 2018, 11:01 am

Get Unetbootin or Rufus and download a "live image" of a Linux operating system. You can use a pen drive or cd as a source for your OS, just plug it in when your computer is off, and choose to beeot to the pen drive or cd on boot by pressing the boot select key (different on each machine, but usually F8, F10, or F12).

Alternatively, download VirtualBox and run a Linux system inside Windows. I've done it. I've even co sidered running Windows inside Linux.



Last edited by MisterSpock on 02 May 2018, 3:54 pm, edited 1 time in total.

lostxprophit
Snowy Owl
Snowy Owl

Joined: 18 Mar 2016
Gender: Male
Posts: 152
Location: British Columbia, Canada

02 May 2018, 12:40 pm

AstroPi wrote:
I think you should try some more popular distro, like linux Mint or some flavour of Ubuntu, you will find help with installing it more easily. Everything depends on what hardware you have, if you have SecureBoot or not, if you have a backup partition for reinstalling Windows etc. Definitely look is not a good criterium for choosing particular linux, because you can change it to almost anything later. You should look for help on the distro forums, if you have troubles with that I can help you (well, at least I can try ;) ). If you don't want to write your computer specs in the open you can PM me.



Yes I agree with AstroPi on this; use Mint or Ubuntu, they're a little more User Friendly

Also, you should know that Linux is an entirely different beast compared to Windows or MacOS

Fear not! There's all sorts of guides and the like available online

r/linux4noobs on Reddit is a great place for newcomers

Also what's great about using a Live CD/USB, is you can use it without actually having to install it!

Edit

If you're wanting to use Ubuntu, here's some guides and stuff on it; also it is from 8 years ago and a lot has changed with Ubuntu since then, so some Info may be a tad outdated

https://www.reddit.com/r/Ubuntu/comment ... y/c0lzpwk/

Edit 2

Also Mr. Spock is correct as well; using a Virtual Machine is another great alternative

I personally use VirtualBox and it's fairly simple to set up


_________________
PDD-NOS
(Pervasive Developmental Disorder Not Otherwise Specified)

Self Diagnosed

No longer Active on here; I have moved to AutisimForums/AspieCentral under the username Isadoorian


Last edited by lostxprophit on 02 May 2018, 2:43 pm, edited 2 times in total.

Soliloquist
Toucan
Toucan

User avatar

Joined: 13 Oct 2011
Age: 50
Gender: Male
Posts: 252

02 May 2018, 2:40 pm

Deepin has security concerns ATM.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=v25Dy66AtNI

Before transitioning to Linux the first thing you should do is find
applications that are cross compatible and use them in Windows for a month.
Obviously you're ok with web browsers and you have Thunderbird for an email client,
but if you use Photoshop try out GIMP. If you use MS Office try WPS Office.
VLC will handle video files, but try Quod Libet for your music library,
If you use ebooks you are probably already using Calibre.

When you are ready to try out a distro I would recommend one using KDE as
this is very similar to Windows 7.
At this point I would like to recommend to you the distro that I've been using
for many years and that is PCLinuxOS.
This distro has great hardware support, current software in it's software repositories,
It's a rolling release, so it is constantly being updated and it's rock solid.

When you install your distro, I would recommend doing a full
install to a USB drive or stick and set the BIOS to boot the usb drive first.
This way you can make sure all your hardware is compatible with your new distro
without touching your Windows installation. Just pull the usb out when you have
finished your evaluation.

When you finally install to the hard drive, make sure that you create both a root and a home partition.
This way when you install programs, all of your settings will be stored in the home folder.
If something should go wrong and you need to re-install the OS, the installer will
write the OS back to the root and leave the home folder alone. When you boot
back into the OS, all your settings, documents, emails etc will be present and you
won't have to touch that backup that you so diligently made.

Also if you're a gamer you should look into gaming support on Linux as It's not great.

lostxprophit wrote:
Also, you should know that Linux is an entirely different beast compared to Windows or MacOS

As in, you need to use the Terminal in order to install Apps most of the time, and also Update and Upgrade Linux


This is not true. Most of the distros have gui's to update or install software from the repos, using the terminal is entirely optional.
Even light ones like Slitaz, antiX and Puppy have gui package managers.
The MATE version of Ubuntu (the distro that you recommend) have one of the best package managers that
they call "The software boutique"



MisterSpock
Veteran
Veteran

User avatar

Joined: 17 Jan 2012
Gender: Male
Posts: 572
Location: Manchester, UK

02 May 2018, 3:58 pm

Also, I want to add that if you like or are used to the appearance of Windows, you can download appearance packs for most distros. I pretty much cloned my W10 desktop environment look and feel with Lubuntu.



Sweetleaf
Veteran
Veteran

User avatar

Joined: 6 Jan 2011
Gender: Female
Posts: 30,235
Location: Somewhere in Colorado

02 May 2018, 4:59 pm

AstroPi wrote:
I think you should try some more popular distro, like linux Mint or some flavour of Ubuntu, you will find help with installing it more easily. Everything depends on what hardware you have, if you have SecureBoot or not, if you have a backup partition for reinstalling Windows etc. Definitely look is not a good criterium for choosing particular linux, because you can change it to almost anything later. You should look for help on the distro forums, if you have troubles with that I can help you (well, at least I can try ;) ). If you don't want to write your computer specs in the open you can PM me.


Yeah I looked at the page for Ubuntu and it seemed like they had more direct instructions, so I would probably go with that one. Also, I understand it runs quite similar to windows which is what I am used to. I have for quite some time wished there was more customization options for windows like there used to be with older versions...so that is one reason I want to try it.

But yeah IDK if my computer has secureboot or not and not entirely sure about the backup partition. But yeah I was also thinking of asking my brother about it. He knows more about programming stuff, so he might be able to help set it up and let me know if he even thinks its something I should do.


_________________
Welcome to hell, this is the end.


Sweetleaf
Veteran
Veteran

User avatar

Joined: 6 Jan 2011
Gender: Female
Posts: 30,235
Location: Somewhere in Colorado

02 May 2018, 5:04 pm

Soliloquist wrote:
Deepin has security concerns ATM.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=v25Dy66AtNI

Before transitioning to Linux the first thing you should do is find
applications that are cross compatible and use them in Windows for a month.
Obviously you're ok with web browsers and you have Thunderbird for an email client,
but if you use Photoshop try out GIMP. If you use MS Office try WPS Office.
VLC will handle video files, but try Quod Libet for your music library,
If you use ebooks you are probably already using Calibre.

When you are ready to try out a distro I would recommend one using KDE as
this is very similar to Windows 7.
At this point I would like to recommend to you the distro that I've been using
for many years and that is PCLinuxOS.
This distro has great hardware support, current software in it's software repositories,
It's a rolling release, so it is constantly being updated and it's rock solid.

When you install your distro, I would recommend doing a full
install to a USB drive or stick and set the BIOS to boot the usb drive first.
This way you can make sure all your hardware is compatible with your new distro
without touching your Windows installation. Just pull the usb out when you have
finished your evaluation.

When you finally install to the hard drive, make sure that you create both a root and a home partition.
This way when you install programs, all of your settings will be stored in the home folder.
If something should go wrong and you need to re-install the OS, the installer will
write the OS back to the root and leave the home folder alone. When you boot
back into the OS, all your settings, documents, emails etc will be present and you
won't have to touch that backup that you so diligently made.

Also if you're a gamer you should look into gaming support on Linux as It's not great.

lostxprophit wrote:
Also, you should know that Linux is an entirely different beast compared to Windows or MacOS

As in, you need to use the Terminal in order to install Apps most of the time, and also Update and Upgrade Linux


This is not true. Most of the distros have gui's to update or install software from the repos, using the terminal is entirely optional.
Even light ones like Slitaz, antiX and Puppy have gui package managers.
The MATE version of Ubuntu (the distro that you recommend) have one of the best package managers that
they call "The software boutique"


I do have to admit some of that is over my head...I am a complete noob to this kind of thing. But I suppose that is another appeal I feel like I could learn a lot more about computers and how they work through the process. The only game I really play on my computer is League of Legends so of course I would have to make sure that would run well on the OS.

But yeah perhaps I will check out some forums for noobs and also probably get my brothers advice, I know he could probably help. And I am a visual/hands on type learner so if he could sit down with me in person to help then I think that would be best....or perhaps there are some kind of free classes to help people with this kind of thing, that could be a good thing to look into as well.


_________________
Welcome to hell, this is the end.


Trogluddite
Veteran
Veteran

User avatar

Joined: 2 Feb 2016
Age: 48
Gender: Male
Posts: 2,866
Location: Yorkshire, UK

02 May 2018, 5:18 pm

I found the transition to Ubuntu worked well for me, and the installer made it very easy to set up the option of still using Windows whenever I need to (I have some programs I use that don't have a Linux equivalent). Updates are very easy on Ubuntu - it has a nice little updater program that tells you when there's anything new available, and it lets you do the actual updating whenever you find it convenient. I don't remember having to use the command line at all since I installed it about a year ago.

If you want the option of using both Linux and Windows it will help if your hard drive is partitioned so that your data (music, videos, documents etc.) are kept in a separate partition or on external hard drives, so that you don't have to duplicate everything. (Partitions just split your hard drive so that it looks as if you have more than one.) If you decide to do that, you may have to tweak Windows a little bit though, as it has a nasty habit of making data partitions inaccessible from Linux - that's something I could take you through if you think that the Windows/Linux combination is the best way to go.


_________________
When you are fighting an invisible monster, first throw a bucket of paint over it.


SabbraCadabra
Veteran
Veteran

User avatar

Joined: 21 Apr 2008
Age: 35
Gender: Male
Posts: 6,913
Location: Michigan

02 May 2018, 5:51 pm

I know you can install Ubuntu alongside Windows, but it runs faster when installed on a partition that uses their specific file system. Running it from a USB or CD is pretty slow too, but gives you an easy way to check things out before committing.

I really should setup a Linux build for recording music, but last time I checked it out, trying to install obscure hardware drivers was super, super complicated, so that really scared me off.


_________________
he had a lot to say, he had a lot of nothing to say
we'll miss him


Trogluddite
Veteran
Veteran

User avatar

Joined: 2 Feb 2016
Age: 48
Gender: Male
Posts: 2,866
Location: Yorkshire, UK

02 May 2018, 6:05 pm

SabbraCadabra wrote:
I really should setup a Linux build for recording music, but last time I checked it out, trying to install obscure hardware drivers was super, super complicated, so that really scared me off.

Yes, I keep a Windows partition for the same reason - accessing all the features of my external audio interface proved too difficult, and there's no Linux version of the control panel software for it. I'd ditch Windows completely in the blink of an eye I could do this.


_________________
When you are fighting an invisible monster, first throw a bucket of paint over it.


cberg
Veteran
Veteran

User avatar

Joined: 31 Dec 2011
Gender: Male
Posts: 9,875
Location: Boulder CO

02 May 2018, 6:34 pm

If you want to study some code while you're at it, you could look at what I run.
https://fedoramagazine.org/whats-new-fedora-28-workstation/
https://getfedora.org/en/workstation/
It's possible to run all the Ubuntu stuff in 'Enterprise Linux' type distributions too & my Linux laptop is working great even with a touchscreen on Fedora. I use Linux regularly & just run virtual Windows at this point, although I may put some of my work in a Windows workstation depending on the price I can get for the right one.


_________________
"Standing on a well-chilled cinder, we see the fading of the suns, and try to recall the vanished brilliance of the origin of the worlds."
-Georges Lemaitre
"I fly through hyperspace, in my green computer interface"
-Gem Tos :mrgreen:


MaxE
Veteran
Veteran

User avatar

Joined: 2 Sep 2013
Gender: Male
Posts: 1,201
Location: Mid-Atlantic US

02 May 2018, 6:56 pm

As a person who once had a dual-boot Window/Ubuntu setup (with each OS installed on a separate hard drive) I can honestly tell you that you probably won't find anything in Linux that is better than what you can get with Windows 10.

If you want to experience Linux, the simplest way is to set up a virtual machine using VMWare Player or VirtualBox then installing a Linux distro to that. Still not that easy for a non-techie but very little long term impact on your computer. However, make sure you have enough physical memory allocated for the virtual machine or it will run like a dog (no offense meant to dogs).

Linux would be a attractive option if you happened to have a working computer but no OS. But you already have Windows 10.


_________________
My WP story


cberg
Veteran
Veteran

User avatar

Joined: 31 Dec 2011
Gender: Male
Posts: 9,875
Location: Boulder CO

02 May 2018, 7:06 pm

I'd recommend dedicating an old machine to trying out a few distributions without bothering to preserve a windows partition. Partitioning is a totally different skill from just playing with operating systems. I use one of these (Lenovo Thinkpad X220) as a backup for my new one and they're down to 1-200 dollars for a decently quick little machine that's very Linux friendly.
Image


_________________
"Standing on a well-chilled cinder, we see the fading of the suns, and try to recall the vanished brilliance of the origin of the worlds."
-Georges Lemaitre
"I fly through hyperspace, in my green computer interface"
-Gem Tos :mrgreen: