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cberg
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02 May 2018, 7:20 pm

Sweetleaf wrote:
AstroPi wrote:
I think you should try some more popular distro, like linux Mint or some flavour of Ubuntu, you will find help with installing it more easily. Everything depends on what hardware you have, if you have SecureBoot or not, if you have a backup partition for reinstalling Windows etc. Definitely look is not a good criterium for choosing particular linux, because you can change it to almost anything later. You should look for help on the distro forums, if you have troubles with that I can help you (well, at least I can try ;) ). If you don't want to write your computer specs in the open you can PM me.


Yeah I looked at the page for Ubuntu and it seemed like they had more direct instructions, so I would probably go with that one. Also, I understand it runs quite similar to windows which is what I am used to. I have for quite some time wished there was more customization options for windows like there used to be with older versions...so that is one reason I want to try it.

But yeah IDK if my computer has secureboot or not and not entirely sure about the backup partition. But yeah I was also thinking of asking my brother about it. He knows more about programming stuff, so he might be able to help set it up and let me know if he even thinks its something I should do.


Most machines let you turn secure boot (UEFI) on or off in BIOS settings.

Also, since you're on Windows 10 you can install the Ubuntu terminal from Windows 'store' although it makes you run everything manually from commands - and install all the libraries to make things render without a Linux desktop behind it. You might be interested in Linux mainly for the differences in look & feel but here's a link anyway: https://www.microsoft.com/store/p/ubuntu/9nblggh4msv6


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SabbraCadabra
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03 May 2018, 8:35 am

Trogluddite wrote:
Yes, I keep a Windows partition for the same reason - accessing all the features of my external audio interface proved too difficult, and there's no Linux version of the control panel software for it. I'd ditch Windows completely in the blink of an eye I could do this.

Actually, IIRC, it was the wireless Internet and the video that I was having issues with.

...audio drivers might be an issue too, though...I could've sworn the kX Project supported Linux, but it looks like it's only Windows and OS X.


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09 May 2018, 4:12 am

I installed it on an old laptop - it's amazing.

Instally software can be a pain.
And if you want to use it for games then it's not so good.
But for all other work, I love it. Comes with many free default programs which are like suped up windows software.
GIMP (photoshop), kpaint, and many more. Even has a few little games.



cberg
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09 May 2018, 3:40 pm

There is literally no easier way to install software, that's why we have Linux. Clicking through install 'wizards' is the most pointlessly time consuming thing about mainstream OSes.

A quick laptop running Red Hat can install 5000+ programs in less than an hour.


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09 May 2018, 4:39 pm

Alright, well I might keep this in mind for some point down the road. I mean after all my laptop does work pretty good with windows 10 so there's not really a good reason to mess with it.

I do still have my previous laptop and it turns on but I think the hard-drive may need to be replaced before I'd be able to put an Operating System on it. Or maybe it just needs an OS...not sure, I suppose I'd have to pull it out of storage and see.

But yeah I think somehow upgrading to windows 10 from windows 7 on that machine was too much for it...so it just screwed the whole system up. To be fair it was sort of on its last leg anyways, I had it for around 5 years, so it probably was not the smartest choice trying to upgrade to windows 10.


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cberg
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09 May 2018, 4:43 pm

Modern laptop drives are pretty tough usually, I'd give the old one a shot. That looks more like a memory issue, Linux in general should be lots smoother than either such Windows version.


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SabbraCadabra
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10 May 2018, 8:29 am

Sweetleaf wrote:
But yeah I think somehow upgrading to windows 10 from windows 7 on that machine was too much for it...so it just screwed the whole system up.

I've read that a lot of people were having trouble with the free Win10 upgrade, and they said the best way to do it is to install the upgrade, and then go through the "reinstallation" process that will basically install a fresh Win10 setup from scratch.


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cberg
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11 May 2018, 12:16 pm

Microsoft is now in the Linux foundation anyway.

Sooner or later we'll see Windows releases with the functionality on by default.


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20 May 2018, 9:32 am

Just discovered this thread, there's some interesting stuff here. I've played around with Linux distros quite a bit over the last couple of years, and while I'd agree that Ubuntu and Mint are the 'safe' big-name choices, there are a handful of smaller, little-known 'gems' that you might like to try out. These are MX Linux, LXLE and Peppermint: the last two in particular are just about as user-friendly and reliable as Linux systems can be, while MX is packed with features while being a little more complex.

If you do opt for Ubuntu, bear in mind that many users can never get comfortable with the 'Unity' desktop interface (I was one such person). Mint is far more conventional and tractable in that department, IMO.

I would not advise a beginner to get involved with the likes of Arch, Fedora, Open Suse and a good few others....


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20 May 2018, 9:53 am

Although I personally always start out with Lubuntu and change it from there, I think what KDE are providing with their Plasma desktop ("Neon") is similar enough to Windows that a newbie won't be overwhelmed. I'm a bit particular about how my computer enviroment works (as I guess most Linux users are), so I've only ever played with it and not used it on a day-in day-out basis. But if I were forced to use one stock distro, it would be Neon or Mint.



cberg
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20 May 2018, 8:15 pm

DeepHour wrote:
Just discovered this thread, there's some interesting stuff here. I've played around with Linux distros quite a bit over the last couple of years, and while I'd agree that Ubuntu and Mint are the 'safe' big-name choices, there are a handful of smaller, little-known 'gems' that you might like to try out. These are MX Linux, LXLE and Peppermint: the last two in particular are just about as user-friendly and reliable as Linux systems can be, while MX is packed with features while being a little more complex.

If you do opt for Ubuntu, bear in mind that many users can never get comfortable with the 'Unity' desktop interface (I was one such person). Mint is far more conventional and tractable in that department, IMO.

I would not advise a beginner to get involved with the likes of Arch, Fedora, Open Suse and a good few others....


Ubuntu just went back to Gnome desktop like Fedora, should be much easier now.

FWIW I started with Red Hat Enterprise & I've been using Fedora for 10 or 12 releases now. It's cozy for anybody who wants to know how their machine ticks.


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"Standing on a well-chilled cinder, we see the fading of the suns, and try to recall the vanished brilliance of the origin of the worlds."
-Georges Lemaitre
"I fly through hyperspace, in my green computer interface"
-Gem Tos :mrgreen: