How To Fail To Notice Your Autism When You’re Actually Autis

Page 1 of 1 [ 10 posts ] 

SaveFerris
Banned
Banned

User avatar

Joined: 3 Sep 2016
Gender: Male
Posts: 14,690
Location: UK

02 Jul 2018, 6:51 pm

Found this blog funny and thought others might too , I also related to a lot of it.

How to fail to notice your Autism when you’re #ActuallyAutistic

Quote:
I’m sure that many people will think that the title is preposterous. How could you not spot something as debilitating as Autism? I know where you’re coming from; people in my own family have said that my self diagnosis of Autism Spectrum Disorder, and my strong suspicion that my dad shares this diagnosis with me, is an insult to Autistic children in our extended family. Sure; if you’re the parent of a child who struggles with communication, has frequent meltdowns and obvious sensory issues, you’re going to feel that it’s impossible to miss.

But miss it I, and my parents, did. Here’s how you can too.

[This is a humorous take on my own biography. It is specific to when and where I was born and how I lived. It is not a catalogue of my symptoms, a guide to symptoms of ASD nor a justification of my diagnosis.]

1. Make sure that your Autistic symptoms rarely provoke classical meltdowns; just go quiet when things get too much.

2. Avoid things that cause you tactile sensory issues. It’s quite easy as a child to avoid touching that specific grade of emery paper, fresh new wooden spoons, and chalk (the last is tricky but can be done). If you do have to touch chalk, wince internally and don’t let on.


_________________
R Tape loading error, 0:1

Hypocrisy is the greatest luxury. Raise the double standard


Arevelion
Deinonychus
Deinonychus

User avatar

Joined: 11 May 2018
Age: 35
Gender: Male
Posts: 348
Location: VT

02 Jul 2018, 7:04 pm

That was amusing, thought it took a year after I was diagnosed before it sunk in what it really meant. My wife has aspergers and she still hasn't comprehended what it means.



ASPartOfMe
Veteran
Veteran

User avatar

Joined: 25 Aug 2013
Age: 62
Gender: Male
Posts: 20,779
Location: Long Island, New York

02 Jul 2018, 7:43 pm

Why the world expert on Asperger's took 30 years to notice condition in his own son


_________________
Professionally Identified and joined WP August 26, 2013
DSM 5: Autism Spectrum Disorder, DSM IV: Aspergers Moderate Severity

My autism is not a superpower. It also isn’t some kind of god-forsaken, endless fountain of suffering inflicted on my family. It’s just part of who I am as a person. - Sara Luterman


SaveFerris
Banned
Banned

User avatar

Joined: 3 Sep 2016
Gender: Male
Posts: 14,690
Location: UK

03 Jul 2018, 6:56 am

^OMG that's nuts


_________________
R Tape loading error, 0:1

Hypocrisy is the greatest luxury. Raise the double standard


SaveFerris
Banned
Banned

User avatar

Joined: 3 Sep 2016
Gender: Male
Posts: 14,690
Location: UK

03 Jul 2018, 6:57 am

Arevelion wrote:
That was amusing, thought it took a year after I was diagnosed before it sunk in what it really meant. My wife has aspergers and she still hasn't comprehended what it means.


I don't think it's really sunk in with me yet.


_________________
R Tape loading error, 0:1

Hypocrisy is the greatest luxury. Raise the double standard


Darmok
Veteran
Veteran

User avatar

Joined: 18 Dec 2015
Gender: Male
Posts: 10,428
Location: New England

03 Jul 2018, 7:00 am

SaveFerris wrote:
Quote:
fresh new wooden spoons

Yikes, it made me cringe and shudder just to read that one. :pale:


_________________
 
There Are Four Lights!


traven
Veteran
Veteran

Joined: 30 Sep 2013
Gender: Female
Posts: 6,597

03 Jul 2018, 7:23 am

if only we had had 'normal' parents



Temeraire
Veteran
Veteran

User avatar

Joined: 15 Oct 2017
Age: 49
Gender: Female
Posts: 3,078
Location: Wiltshire, U.K.

03 Jul 2018, 7:30 am

It took me over 40 years to realise I had sensory issues, so it did make me laugh when he failed to mention these to his doctor. How am I supposed to know how everyone in the world experiences light or noise? This is something I have wondered.

More importantly, how am I supposed to settle down again into my natural way of being when every part of me has been thrown up in the air - I can't catch all the pieces and those that I have don't seem to fit together anymore.

I know with time this will change but blimey, what a mind blowing discovery. My gut feeling is that my whole being is still in shock and will become more integrated when it has done all it's grieving and convalescing.



Trogluddite
Veteran
Veteran

User avatar

Joined: 2 Feb 2016
Age: 49
Gender: Male
Posts: 3,024
Location: Yorkshire, UK

03 Jul 2018, 12:20 pm

Thanks, Ferris, that was both very funny and I recognised a hell of a lot of it. A few more of my own...

If you are sharing your honest experiences of life, and for no apparent reason, the other people in the conversation just give you blank stares or think you are trying to be funny when you weren't, remember to mark this subject as "never talk about this again to anyone, ever" - you've obviously accidentally stumbled into some kind of inexplicable taboo. When introducing new subjects which you think could possibly fall into this category, always do so as flippantly as possible, so that you can plausibly claim to have been "only joking", and always be prepared to quickly laugh along with everyone else while secretly cringing inside. "Never talk about this again to anyone, ever" should, of course, be an absolute, black-or-white category, so that you don't accidentally embarrass your doctor, counsellor or psychologist.

The sleep problems which are common for autistic people are a god-send for explaining behaviours which you have no idea might be related to autism. When faced with awkward social situations, never underestimate the power of "I'm really tired because I didn't sleep well" as a generic reason for all those frustrating lapses in social awareness. It's a big bonus if you can actually convince people to take your insomnia seriously so that you don't even have to bother explaining any more.

When people are talking to you about a completely baffling subject which you struggle to understand, just say "Mmmm", "Yeesss" and "I know what you mean" at regular intervals whether you know what they mean or not. It's very unlikely that they will test your knowledge as long as they're doing most of the talking, and it seems to make them feel better for some reason. Presumably, this is the behaviour referred to as "empathising", which is obviously idealised and exaggerated because no-one else seems to have much of a clue what I'm talking about either.

When someone asks you to do something, don't frustrate them by taking huge amounts of time and procrastination to determine what you're being asked and whether you can do it - just unconditionally agree to everything so that they go away as soon as possible. You will have plenty of time later to ponder exactly which bits of the request you might have missed completely or didn't understand, and can decide at your leisure whether to appear "stupid" by asking for clarification, "incompetent" because you did it wrong, or "lazy" because you didn't get it done in time. In the long-term, this problem will resolve itself easily enough once people stop bothering to ask you in the first place or hand you your redundancy.

If somebody suggests that you might be autistic, just remember - autism is a spectrum, so everyone is on it! Therefore, the person who made the suggestion is technically correct, but the suggestion is so trivially true that it can be safely disregarded.


_________________
When you are fighting an invisible monster, first throw a bucket of paint over it.


ASPartOfMe
Veteran
Veteran

User avatar

Joined: 25 Aug 2013
Age: 62
Gender: Male
Posts: 20,779
Location: Long Island, New York

03 Jul 2018, 12:26 pm

ASPartOfMe wrote:

SaveFerris wrote:
^OMG that's nuts


This type of thing is not uncommon. That is why an outsiders prespective is good sometimes.


_________________
Professionally Identified and joined WP August 26, 2013
DSM 5: Autism Spectrum Disorder, DSM IV: Aspergers Moderate Severity

My autism is not a superpower. It also isn’t some kind of god-forsaken, endless fountain of suffering inflicted on my family. It’s just part of who I am as a person. - Sara Luterman