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If Aspie/HFA --- Are you color blind?
Not color blind (male) 50%  50%  [ 11 ]
Not color blind (female) 23%  23%  [ 5 ]
Color blind (male) 27%  27%  [ 6 ]
Color blind (female) 0%  0%  [ 0 ]
Total votes : 22

jimmy m
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04 Jul 2018, 10:21 am

I was wondering if there is any linkage between Asperger's/High Functioning Autism and Colorblindness. Approximately 8 percent of men and 0.5 percent of women with Northern European ancestry have color blindness. Here is an on-line tests for colorblindness. Color Blindness Test

Generally there are 6 types of color blindness. These are:

Protanomaly: In males with protanomaly, the red cone photopigment is abnormal. Red, orange, and yellow appear greener and colors are not as bright. This condition is mild and doesn’t usually interfere with daily living. Protanomaly is an X-linked disorder estimated to affect 1 percent of males.

Protanopia: In males with protanopia, there are no working red cone cells. Red appears as black. Certain shades of orange, yellow, and green all appear as yellow. Protanopia is an X-linked disorder that is estimated to affect 1 percent of males.

Deuteranomaly: In males with deuteranomaly, the green cone photopigment is abnormal. Yellow and green appear redder and it is difficult to tell violet from blue. This condition is mild and doesn’t interfere with daily living.

Deuteranomaly is the most common form of color blindness and is an X-linked disorder affecting 5 percent of males.

Deuteranopia: In males with deuteranopia, there are no working green cone cells. They tend to see reds as brownish-yellow and greens as beige. Deuteranopia is an X-linked disorder that affects about 1 percent of males.

Tritanomaly: People with tritanomaly have functionally limited blue cone cells. Blue appears greener and it can be difficult to tell yellow and red from pink. Tritanomaly is extremely rare. It is an autosomal dominant disorder affecting males and females equally.

Tritanopia: People with tritanopia, also known as blue-yellow color blindness, lack blue cone cells. Blue appears green and yellow appears violet or light grey. Tritanopia is an extremely rare autosomal recessive disorder affecting males and females equally.

Tritanopes/tritanomalous are very rare. One in 30,000 to 50,000 people.

Please leave a comment on your type of color blindness.


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jimmy m
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04 Jul 2018, 10:24 am

Protanomalous.


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nick007
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05 Jul 2018, 8:19 am

I have some colorblindness but I was born with a rare low vision disorder that includes that. I highly doubt there's a link between my Aspergers & my vision disorder.


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Mythos
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12 Sep 2018, 10:07 pm

Not as far as I'm aware. I really hope I don't find that I am and never realised.



brightonpete
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12 Oct 2018, 4:02 pm

Not I. I see colors in everything.



quite an extreme
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18 Apr 2020, 12:29 pm

jimmy m wrote:
Protanomalous.

I'm too. Guess there is a relation to Asperger syndrome.


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IsabellaLinton
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18 Apr 2020, 12:39 pm

My male friend who is almost certainly on the spectrum (doesn't want diagnosed), has red - green colour blindness. I think it sounds like Protonomoly.

I don't think I'm colour blind, but I've noticed that I often see moss green or dusty plum as "grey", when no one else does.



kraftiekortie
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20 Apr 2020, 5:46 am

No colorblindness



firemonkey
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20 Apr 2020, 8:37 am

Your Color Blind Test Result
NORMAL
COLOR VISION

You have normal color vision, which means you can see up to one million distinct shades of color!


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Your neurodiverse (Aspie) score: 133 of 200
Your neurotypical (non-autistic) score: 47 of 200
You are very likely neurodiverse (Aspie)


firemonkey
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20 Apr 2020, 8:47 am

Quote:
Colour vision

There are few studies, which directly address colour performance in ASD. Based on existing results, it can be said that there is poor colour perception in autism. Franklin, Pilling and Davies98 and Franklin et al99, 100 carried out a series of colour‐detection experiments on high functioning children with autism using various tasks, such as recognition memory, a search task and a target detection task. The findings found a general reduction in sensitivity to colour detection rather than having a specific colour defect such either tritanopia (blue‐yellow) or deuteranopia (red‐green). To these findings, Franklin et al99 worked with 14 high‐functioning autistic (HFA) children (mean age of 14 years) attending specialty a school and 14 matched typical developing children as a control group. The first experiment used the Farnsworth‐Munsell 100 hue test101 to measure the accuracy of chromatic discrimination and to identify the nature of any colour deficit in autism. The experiment was done with four trays of different coloured caps and the statistical results reported higher errors in the ASD group than the typical developing children group for colour discrimination. A second experiment of a threshold discrimination task was conducted to investigate colour blindness of the subsystem of colour vision (red‐green or blue‐yellow). There were 34 high‐functioning autistic children compared to 33 typical developing children. The first part of the task was to define a boundary line between the two halves of different coloured circles that varied in colours but had constant luminance for chromatic threshold. The second part was a luminance threshold task, the luminance of the two hemispheres changed along the task, while the colour was constant. All children had been pre‐tested with the City colour vision test102 and they were fully instructed throughout the experiment. Results showed a higher threshold in chromatic discrimination in high‐functioning autistics but no significant differences in defining luminance boundaries between the two groups as well as between the age or the non‐verbal inelegancy. Both experiments suggested that a true deficit was found in colour perception in ASD and no task difficulty or/and experimental differences can account for the variation of the results.


https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/ful ... /cxo.12383

I have a certain degree of difficulty when it comes to shades within a colour .


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You are very likely neurodiverse (Aspie)


jimmy m
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20 Apr 2020, 9:52 am

I remember in the fourth grade, they would give us a spelling test and had us write the names of various colors. I failed. Not that I couldn't spell the names but rather I could not perceive the colors properly.

It wasn't until ten years later I was diagnosed with color blindness.


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BTDT
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20 Apr 2020, 9:54 am

None. I've checked numerous times though.



nick007
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21 Apr 2020, 5:22 am

jimmy m wrote:
It wasn't until ten years later I was diagnosed with color blindness.
I was born with a condition called Incomplete Achromatopsia. I can see some colors but my color vision is majorly limited. I can get black, red & brown mixed up, yellow & green mixed up, & blue & purple mixed up. When I take those color tests where there's big circles with different colored dots in em & the dots are supposed to make a number; I can only see the number in the 1st one. My condition also makes me very nearsighted even with glasses. Lighting conditions & the color things are make a huge difference as well. It's harder for me to read things in lite blue. My condition wasn't diagnosed till my senior year of high-school cuz the docs never took me seriously. They 1st thought I didn't know how to read but then when I read something up close with no problem, they assumed I was being difficult cuz I didn't want to wear glasses. I had problems cooperating with the eye docs cuz it's very difficult to put drops in my eyes cuz my eyes are very sensitive to em but that may be unrelated to my vision disorder. Then you factor in me being a kid with Aspergers who had serious vision problems that were getting dismissed & it's really no wonder why I got upset & wasn't on my best behavior halfway through my appointment. I didn't like wearing glasses cuz they only help my distance vision a little at the expense of making my close vision worse. They make light & glares worse too. I only wore my glasses to school, work, & things like going to the movies.


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