Page 2 of 4 [ 49 posts ]  Go to page Previous  1, 2, 3, 4  Next

Tequila
Veteran
Veteran

Joined: 25 Feb 2006
Age: 31
Gender: Male
Posts: 30,500
Location: Lancashire, UK

12 Jul 2018, 12:09 pm

Thd book See No Evil is a stellar read if you track it down DeepHour.



karathraceandherspecialdestiny
Veteran
Veteran

Joined: 22 Jan 2017
Age: 39
Gender: Female
Posts: 1,857

12 Jul 2018, 3:56 pm

Tequila wrote:
karathraceandherspecialdestiny wrote:
This is why--it's a totally mental backwards concept, but that's laissez-faire capitalism for you:

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Planned_obsolescence

Modern electronics are literally designed to break easily and quickly, so you will constantly be replacing them. That is the plan, ridiculous waste for the sake of naked greed.


Arrant nonsense but you kind of know that.


Someone resents the criticism of unrestrained capitalism! :lol:



karathraceandherspecialdestiny
Veteran
Veteran

Joined: 22 Jan 2017
Age: 39
Gender: Female
Posts: 1,857

12 Jul 2018, 4:04 pm

DeepHour wrote:
karathraceandherspecialdestiny wrote:
This is why--it's a totally mental backwards concept, but that's laissez-faire capitalism for you:

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Planned_obsolescence

Modern electronics are literally designed to break easily and quickly, so you will constantly be replacing them. That is the plan, ridiculous waste for the sake of naked greed.



Thanks for posting the Wikipedia article - it's really informative.

There's a suggestion there that the powers that be, at least in parts of the EU, are beginning to take notice of this phenomenon and may legislate at some point. I wouldn't expect too much though - the globalized nature of these companies means that it's easy to switch production to more 'favourable' locations, and the prevailing political culture in many, if not most, Western countries still favours deregulation and 'business-friendly' policies over intervention. Some would even argue that corporations have 'captured' the political establishment.


I'm trying to remember how I was introduced to the concept and can't remember. Possibly college? It's something that I learned about years ago, anyway. I just noticed growing up that the sort of appliances designed in my parents time were made better (usually with metal instead of mostly cheap plastics that wear and stress and break more easily) and lasted much longer. My mother's old vacuum is one example. It was heavy but it worked well for a couple decades. I still have the old Brentwood toaster my parents bought for our household when I was a child. It still works and is sitting on my kitchen counter-top as we speak. Try to imagine a cheap modern mostly plastic toaster lasting for going on 4 decades!



Tequila
Veteran
Veteran

Joined: 25 Feb 2006
Age: 31
Gender: Male
Posts: 30,500
Location: Lancashire, UK

12 Jul 2018, 4:05 pm

karathraceandherspecialdestiny wrote:
Tequila wrote:
karathraceandherspecialdestiny wrote:
This is why--it's a totally mental backwards concept, but that's laissez-faire capitalism for you:

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Planned_obsolescence

Modern electronics are literally designed to break easily and quickly, so you will constantly be replacing them. That is the plan, ridiculous waste for the sake of naked greed.


Arrant nonsense but you kind of know that.


Someone resents the criticism of unrestrained capitalism! :lol:


It's not criticism, it's vitriolic attack. Psychs bore me.

Planned obsolesence really doesn't go on. I can have a computer go ten years easy. A tablet five years (less than 10 cents a day). As for VHS - the last country to have a VHS scene stopped releasing videos ten years ago.



karathraceandherspecialdestiny
Veteran
Veteran

Joined: 22 Jan 2017
Age: 39
Gender: Female
Posts: 1,857

12 Jul 2018, 4:11 pm

Tequila wrote:
karathraceandherspecialdestiny wrote:
Tequila wrote:
karathraceandherspecialdestiny wrote:
This is why--it's a totally mental backwards concept, but that's laissez-faire capitalism for you:

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Planned_obsolescence

Modern electronics are literally designed to break easily and quickly, so you will constantly be replacing them. That is the plan, ridiculous waste for the sake of naked greed.


Arrant nonsense but you kind of know that.


Someone resents the criticism of unrestrained capitalism! :lol:


It's not criticism, it's vitriolic attack. Psychs bore me.

Planned obsolesence really doesn't go on. I can have a computer go ten years easy. A tablet five years (less than 10 cents a day). As for VHS - the last country to have a VHS scene stopped releasing videos ten years ago.


https://www.forbes.com/sites/adamsarhan ... f295e53cf2

https://www.popularmechanics.com/techno ... ce-460210/

https://www.economist.com/news/2009/03/ ... solescence

Yup, it's all arrant nonsense. :lol:

And what am I vitriolically attacking? And what is a "Psych"?



Tequila
Veteran
Veteran

Joined: 25 Feb 2006
Age: 31
Gender: Male
Posts: 30,500
Location: Lancashire, UK

12 Jul 2018, 4:16 pm

It's the writing style.



MagicKnight
Velociraptor
Velociraptor

Joined: 14 Mar 2016
Age: 44
Gender: Male
Posts: 411

12 Jul 2018, 4:18 pm

As a vintage computers collector, I have loads of CRT monitors and TV sets. They are already showing their ages, but compared to my flat screen, they can be perceived as much more robust. Hands down.

Now, consumer products from the 1980s may also be rubbish compared to the 1970s. I have taken apart tape decks, receivers, amplifiers from the 1980s that needed important components to be replaced while the 1970s counterparts needed a bit of TLC and nothing else.

Plus, I have this 1973 Phillips mono radio recorder that sounds warm, lovely, beautiful. I decided to leave its innards untouched as they are, because I could even spoil its magic. Its mechanical parts need all sort of fixes but it still works. Meanwhile, I have two high-end Technics decks from 1986 that don't even work anymore.

Your mileage may vary, it all depends on the devices in question, models and manufacturers, but from where I stand even cookers and fridges these days are rubbish compared to what we had way back when. My own cooker weighs as much as the cardboard in which it was shipped!



karathraceandherspecialdestiny
Veteran
Veteran

Joined: 22 Jan 2017
Age: 39
Gender: Female
Posts: 1,857

12 Jul 2018, 4:20 pm

Tequila wrote:
It's the writing style.


My writing style makes me a "Psych"? What are you trying to say?

You sound like you might be mad because you don't have much of an argument against the existence of planned obsolescence other than "that doesn't happen", which is a pretty weak argument. Are you making fun of me because your argument is weak?



SaveFerris
Forum Moderator
Forum Moderator

User avatar

Joined: 3 Sep 2016
Gender: Male
Posts: 13,879
Location: UK

13 Jul 2018, 5:05 am

Tequila wrote:
karathraceandherspecialdestiny wrote:
This is why--it's a totally mental backwards concept, but that's laissez-faire capitalism for you:

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Planned_obsolescence

Modern electronics are literally designed to break easily and quickly, so you will constantly be replacing them. That is the plan, ridiculous waste for the sake of naked greed.


Arrant nonsense but you kind of know that.


Even though I wear my foil hat when I say this I am of the the same opinion of KTAHSP


_________________
R Tape loading error, 0:1

Hypocrisy is the greatest luxury. Raise the double standard


auntblabby
Veteran
Veteran

User avatar

Joined: 12 Feb 2010
Gender: Male
Posts: 86,432
Location: the island of defective toy santas

13 Jul 2018, 5:44 am

I have a 1998 puter whose last OS was w98SE, the hard drives in there still work. but on my most recent laptop I went through 3 hard drives about a month apart, each failed, before I said to hell with it and replaced with something with no moving parts to fail, an SSD. lord knows if the electrons and silicon themselves will fail.



DeepHour
Veteran
Veteran

User avatar

Joined: 1 Jun 2014
Gender: Male
Posts: 34,019
Location: United Kingdom

13 Jul 2018, 9:58 am

^ I've seen quite a few reports of increasing rates of hard drive failure recently. Those with very high capacity (eg 3 or 4 TB) seem to be more at risk.

Seagate HDDs appear to have acquired a particularly poor reputation over the last few years. That said, I've got a lot of drives by other manufacturers up to 15 years old, which still perform fine. Western Digital seems to be a particularly reliable brand.

Anecdotal evidence would also suggest that solid state drives might have similar failure rates to their mechanical equivalents. After all, the flash memory technology used in usb thumb drives hardly has a spotless reliability record.


_________________
On a mountain range
I'm Doctor Strange


auntblabby
Veteran
Veteran

User avatar

Joined: 12 Feb 2010
Gender: Male
Posts: 86,432
Location: the island of defective toy santas

13 Jul 2018, 4:25 pm

my SSD is 6 years old so far. crossed fingers.



Enigmatic_Oddity
Veteran
Veteran

User avatar

Joined: 4 Nov 2005
Age: 33
Gender: Male
Posts: 2,570

16 Jul 2018, 2:29 am

Why are you using such outdated technology? Of course it's unreliable, there's little incentive for manufacturers to make decent quality hardware for such an uncompetitive, niche market.



DeepHour
Veteran
Veteran

User avatar

Joined: 1 Jun 2014
Gender: Male
Posts: 34,019
Location: United Kingdom

16 Jul 2018, 8:22 am

^ You might be missing the point here.

Recordable dvd technology was the 'state of the art' in the early 21st century, yet it was unreliable and shoddily executed from the start, and never really improved.

It was a pretty bad sign that there were at least five different disc formats, with huge degrees of incompatibility. You couldn't use a +R disc in a recorder designed for -R, but also a -R recorder might work with -R discs made by Verbatim, but not by Maxell or TDK.

+RW discs could be erased and reused and were supposedly good for 1000 recordings, but in practice you'd be lucky to get more than 10 uses out of them before they failed. I lost quite a few valuable recordings which I entrusted to this half-baked, half-digested technology.

As for -RW, they used a system so complicated that I haven't yet worked it out, 12 years after first encountering them.


_________________
On a mountain range
I'm Doctor Strange


auntblabby
Veteran
Veteran

User avatar

Joined: 12 Feb 2010
Gender: Male
Posts: 86,432
Location: the island of defective toy santas

16 Jul 2018, 7:46 pm

I liked DVD-RAM while it lasted.