Do you think autistic people are less prone too...

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dragonsanddemons
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07 Aug 2018, 1:04 pm

Arganger wrote:
Would an iguana be a good idea? They are herbivores and lizards.


I would love to have an iguana, but unfortunately we don't have the space for one right now. But crested geckos can be fed a pre-made food mixture, and several different types of that are readily available in pet stores, so at least I have a small lizard that doesn't need to be fed insects. He just gets the occasional piece of fresh fruit as a treat - particularly bananas, he loves those. But thank you for the suggestion :)


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Serpentine
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10 Aug 2018, 12:33 am

Iguanas don't make particularly good pets in my experience. Not only do they require vast enclosures, they have wicked claws, barbed tails that crack like a whip and lay your arm wide open, and a bite that can take off part of your finger.

None of my snakes kill anything. I buy frozen, humanely raised mice and rats from Big Cheese Rodents, thaw them in warm water and feed them from tongs. Every snake I have ever had has learned to eat mousescicles. Even that was hard at first but eventually you realize they're food just like what goes into your dog or cat's bowl in more benign-looking form or what you might pick up for yourself in a burger.

There are even special snake "sausages" made from ground meat and bone, though at first it takes a bit of effort to convince a snake to accept them. Also not sure if they are as nutritious as whole prey, though the company swears they absolutely are. But that's another option if frozen rodents are too much to handle.

I can't feed live mice or rats either. In fact, I keep pet rats. They are great little guys, albeit with only 2 year life spans. They are very smart and personable.


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Arganger
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10 Aug 2018, 10:10 am

Serpentine wrote:
Iguanas don't make particularly good pets in my experience. Not only do they require vast enclosures, they have wicked claws, barbed tails that crack like a whip and lay your arm wide open, and a bite that can take off part of your finger.

None of my snakes kill anything. I buy frozen, humanely raised mice and rats from Big Cheese Rodents, thaw them in warm water and feed them from tongs. Every snake I have ever had has learned to eat mousescicles. Even that was hard at first but eventually you realize they're food just like what goes into your dog or cat's bowl in more benign-looking form or what you might pick up for yourself in a burger.

There are even special snake "sausages" made from ground meat and bone, though at first it takes a bit of effort to convince a snake to accept them. Also not sure if they are as nutritious as whole prey, though the company swears they absolutely are. But that's another option if frozen rodents are too much to handle.

I can't feed live mice or rats either. In fact, I keep pet rats. They are great little guys, albeit with only 2 year life spans. They are very smart and personable.


I cannot stand the thought myself regardless anyway (I'm a vegetarian), but not all snakes will eat frozen rodents. My sisters snake eventually rejected them, and didn't eat for a year. My sister eventually found out the problem was she wanted live mice.


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Serpentine
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10 Aug 2018, 2:03 pm

Some species of garter snakes eat fish and you can offer them frozen / thawed silversides from the pet shop, if that is something you could manage.

There's also an unusual snake species that eats eggs.

There are many strategies I have learned over the years to get a snake to take thawed mice or rats. 90% of it is persistence and 10% is trickery.

There are around 60 snakes in my breeding colony, some of whom never ate anything other than live before they came to me and had to learn to get with the program whether they wanted to or not. Some of them take more effort than others, but I have a 100% success rate so far and none have starved or been permitted to go a year without eating (not criticizing your sister at all, just saying I have a lot of tricks up my sleeve that most people who keep a pet or two probably don't).

I bet your sister has a ball python, doesn't she? They are a stubborn lot, and they can hold out long after other snakes would have starved to death. :mrgreen:

If you're interested, you can PM me and I can offer advice on how she can transition to frozen / thawed. Not only is it more humane, but predeceased food can't bite and blind or maim her snake.


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Arganger
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10 Aug 2018, 5:58 pm

Serpentine wrote:
Some species of garter snakes eat fish and you can offer them frozen / thawed silversides from the pet shop, if that is something you could manage.

There's also an unusual snake species that eats eggs.

There are many strategies I have learned over the years to get a snake to take thawed mice or rats. 90% of it is persistence and 10% is trickery.

There are around 60 snakes in my breeding colony, some of whom never ate anything other than live before they came to me and had to learn to get with the program whether they wanted to or not. Some of them take more effort than others, but I have a 100% success rate so far and none have starved or been permitted to go a year without eating (not criticizing your sister at all, just saying I have a lot of tricks up my sleeve that most people who keep a pet or two probably don't).

I bet your sister has a ball python, doesn't she? They are a stubborn lot, and they can hold out long after other snakes would have starved to death. :mrgreen:

If you're interested, you can PM me and I can offer advice on how she can transition to frozen / thawed. Not only is it more humane, but predeceased food can't bite and blind or maim her snake.


Her snake passed away a few months ago, so sadly it is to late.
I would like to hear more about the egg eating snakes, what is is called and can the eggs be unfertilized?


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Suspected; PTSD (Treated, as my counselor did notice), possible PCOS, PMDD, Learning disabilities (Sure of it, unknown what they are), possibly something wrong with immune system (Sick about as much as I'm not) Possible EDS- hyper mobility type (Will be getting tested, suggested by doctor) dysautonomia


Serpentine
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10 Aug 2018, 6:50 pm

African egg-eating snake, Dasypeltis spp.

https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dasypeltis_scabra

Eggs need not be fertilized. If you're serious about wanting one you can PM me and I'll give you care instructions and a reputable breeder.


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LadyLucifer
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11 Aug 2018, 10:26 pm

Thats a tough question because you have to consider all the factors of the indvidual. How HF or LF are they? What is their environment like? How old is this person? How exposed to vareity is this person? Etc.


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