10-year-old autistic boy handcuffed by Texas police

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Tim_Tex
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12 Aug 2018, 1:29 am

https://www.star-telegram.com/news/local/community/article216535490.html

I hate my state.


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ASPartOfMe
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12 Aug 2018, 2:08 am

Again :(
Schools have outsouced disipline for a long time now.


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SunsetStar
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12 Aug 2018, 12:45 pm

I'm new and not allowed to post links. I read in full article the child was poking other students. People act as if there's no reason to be afraid of Autistic people, and Autistic people are always victims of a cruel cruel world hating them for no reason.

Neurotypical students should have the right to be safe, and to be able to say no. Autism advocacy seems to say it's the neurotypical students being unreasonable, they must have done something to get poked at, they were probably big bad mean bullies picking on the poor Autistic child. People don't desire to be around people who always deflect responsibility and position themselves as helpless victims, I don't see how it benefits us to keep pushing that.

But keeping the child who pokes kids out of school is discrimination. And stopping him from assaulting other students is discrimination. Suggesting he has ever done anything other than breathing, smiling, and radiating goodness to all is discrimination. Who wants to be around someone you can't say no to or hold responsible without they and their advocates gasping and glaring at you, no one is allowed to ever say the angelic Autistic god did wrong!

You want acceptance, it starts with accountability. It means instead of, "The poor martyr Autistic child was handcuffed by the big bad policemen for no reason, and we're all oppressed just for having been born different!" Acknowledging this child had been aggravating other students. That even if his Autism made him unable to control his actions, it's not okay for him to lash out at other kids.

That's being responsible, that's advocacy. Hearing and acknowledging both sides of the story and respecting everyone involved.



ASPartOfMe
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12 Aug 2018, 2:52 pm

SunsetStar wrote:
I'm new and not allowed to post links. I read in full article the child was poking other students. People act as if there's no reason to be afraid of Autistic people, and Autistic people are always victims of a cruel cruel world hating them for no reason.

Neurotypical students should have the right to be safe, and to be able to say no. Autism advocacy seems to say it's the neurotypical students being unreasonable, they must have done something to get poked at, they were probably big bad mean bullies picking on the poor Autistic child. People don't desire to be around people who always deflect responsibility and position themselves as helpless victims, I don't see how it benefits us to keep pushing that.

But keeping the child who pokes kids out of school is discrimination. And stopping him from assaulting other students is discrimination. Suggesting he has ever done anything other than breathing, smiling, and radiating goodness to all is discrimination. Who wants to be around someone you can't say no to or hold responsible without they and their advocates gasping and glaring at you, no one is allowed to ever say the angelic Autistic god did wrong!

You want acceptance, it starts with accountability. It means instead of, "The poor martyr Autistic child was handcuffed by the big bad policemen for no reason, and we're all oppressed just for having been born different!" Acknowledging this child had been aggravating other students. That even if his Autism made him unable to control his actions, it's not okay for him to lash out at other kids.

That's being responsible, that's advocacy. Hearing and acknowledging both sides of the story and respecting everyone involved.

Welcome to wrong planet.

Few are saying, poor victim autistic kid. What I am saying is that is using law enforcement is most often an extreme overreaction. We are not talking about adults or even teenagers but children who should be able to be easily restrained by an adult without damage. Schools used to deal with "problem children" in-house. Now because of fear of lawsuits and so on, they have outsourced discipline to the police who are usually ill-equipped to deal with these situations. The police need to be solving crimes not doing the jobs teachers should be doing.


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Tim_Tex
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12 Aug 2018, 6:03 pm

We can’t do wrong? Elliott Rodgers got our swiftest condemnation, as did Adam Lanza and the Umpqua shooter.

But I agree that law enforcement is way too aggressive, especially with autistics and people of color.


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ruscolokse
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12 Aug 2018, 6:19 pm

As a European, these sort of US news never fail to amaze me... Where I live, schools provide an assistant for kids like that, but in Texas... :scratch:



Tim_Tex
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13 Aug 2018, 11:54 am

ruscolokse wrote:
As a European, these sort of US news never fail to amaze me... Where I live, schools provide an assistant for kids like that, but in Texas... :scratch:


Both our schools and law enforcement are crap.


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