Page 1 of 2 [ 16 posts ]  Go to page 1, 2  Next

y-pod
Veteran
Veteran

User avatar

Joined: 16 Apr 2010
Age: 46
Gender: Female
Posts: 1,238
Location: Canada

07 Nov 2018, 6:30 am

I think I have the radar for spotting other autistic people. Although I'm not sure what to do about it. I don't imagine I can just go up to them and say "Hi are you autistic? Good I am, too. Let's be buddies." :D OK I might actually be brash enough to do that, but I don't think it will go very well. It could get very awkward if they say "No I'm not."

I just identified someone in my class to be on the spectrum and tried to befriend her. She gave me her phone number, but didn't respond much to text. She keeps to herself most of the time and didn't mingle. I suppose I'll never know for sure unless I get the nerve to go ask her. Sometimes being an extroverted autistic person sucks. You want to approach people so much but you're blunt and direct and keep making social blunders. Then even other aspies don't want to associate with you. :(


_________________
AQ score: 44
Aspie mom to two autistic sons (17 & 15 )


magz
Veteran
Veteran

User avatar

Joined: 1 Jun 2017
Age: 33
Gender: Female
Posts: 1,310
Location: Poland

07 Nov 2018, 7:38 am

I can't spot other autistics, at least not instantly, but I often get spotted by people with mental health conditions as someone they can talk about it.


_________________
"You should take the approach that you’re wrong. Your goal is to be less wrong." ― Elon Musk


MarryKate
Butterfly
Butterfly

Joined: 29 Oct 2018
Posts: 17

07 Nov 2018, 10:40 am

Sometimes I may think it but not entirely sure I’m kind of in the same boat as you.
It’s hard to tell really, they could just be socially awkward or have anxiety or something whatever



kraftiekortie
Veteran
Veteran

User avatar

Joined: 4 Feb 2014
Gender: Male
Posts: 51,669
Location: Queens, NYC

07 Nov 2018, 10:43 am

There are times when I could. Though I don't rely totally on my judgment.



Prometheus18
Velociraptor
Velociraptor

User avatar

Joined: 18 Aug 2018
Age: 22
Gender: Male
Posts: 407

07 Nov 2018, 12:41 pm

Yes, absolutely. Sometimes I want to approach them on the subject, but I suppose I don't want to face the possibility of being wrong and getting reprimanded.


_________________
L'enfer c'est les autres.
- Sartre

The mass of men lead lives of quiet desperation.
- Henry David Thoreau


Joe90
Veteran
Veteran

User avatar

Joined: 23 Feb 2010
Gender: Female
Posts: 15,058
Location: Essex, UK

07 Nov 2018, 2:21 pm

I can tell if they are obvious enough, but i find Aspie males are easier to spot than Aspie females.

Sometimes I find it hard to believe someone is on the spectrum if they have friends. I know I shouldn't generalise Aspies as being friendless, but because I'm female with mild Asperger's yet I still fail to be included in a group in social activities (even though my Asperger's is not obvious to others), I just wonder how other people on the spectrum manage to find friends and be regularly invited out with them. I understand how if their friends are also non-NT, but when the friends are NT and the Aspie has a rather large circle of NT friends, it just baffles me.


_________________
Straight Female
From East UK (Essex)
Aged 28

On antidepressants (50mg Sertraline) ~ Helps control emotional outbursts but not general anxiety.


Sensei Processor
Butterfly
Butterfly

User avatar

Joined: 7 Nov 2018
Age: 18
Gender: Female
Posts: 13
Location: Canada

07 Nov 2018, 4:36 pm

Oh yeah. Usually neither of us wants to talk though, so it never leads to much.


_________________
Hardcore visual stimmer and daydreamer since 2000
AQ : 40


IstominFan
Veteran
Veteran

Joined: 25 Nov 2016
Age: 54
Gender: Female
Posts: 6,858
Location: Santa Maria, CA.

07 Nov 2018, 5:09 pm

I have seen people who were diagnosed with autism, both high and low functioning, and others I suspected to have Asperger syndrome.



KennyIOM
Raven
Raven

User avatar

Joined: 3 Oct 2014
Age: 35
Gender: Male
Posts: 104

07 Nov 2018, 5:22 pm

I have recognised some people who are on the spectrum. I normally find out much later that they are autistic though.

I'm not sure if it is a radar, as much as an ability to recognise symptoms after researching autism.



ASPartOfMe
Veteran
Veteran

User avatar

Joined: 25 Aug 2013
Age: 61
Gender: Male
Posts: 16,651
Location: Long Island, New York

07 Nov 2018, 5:57 pm

I hate to break it to you but none of you can positively identify an aspie.

You are seeing how the person is acting in public over a limited period of time. You don't know what the person is thinking or his thinking patterns.

You do not know what this person's behavior and thinking patterns were when they were a child. This knowledge is necessary as autism is a developmental condition meaning it is not something you can catch.

You do not know if the "aspie" behaviors you are observing is caused by autism. Many other conditions can cause behaviors associated with autism.

Now the good news.
You can observe a pattern of behaviors associated with autism and with the proper knowledge have decent reasons to SUSPECT another person is autistic.

Now the bad news
That is as far as it goes unless you have autistic diagnostic savant skills that the rest of us mortals and autism experts have not discovered yet.


_________________
Every idea is an incitement - Justice Oliver Wendell Holmes

Recovering from tongue cancer, somewhat verbal.
Identified and joined WP August 26, 2013
DSM 5: Autism Spectrum Disorder, DSM IV: Aspergers Moderate Severity


Sensei Processor
Butterfly
Butterfly

User avatar

Joined: 7 Nov 2018
Age: 18
Gender: Female
Posts: 13
Location: Canada

07 Nov 2018, 11:11 pm

ASPartOfMe wrote:
I hate to break it to you but none of you can positively identify an aspie.

You are seeing how the person is acting in public over a limited period of time. You don't know what the person is thinking or his thinking patterns.

You do not know what this person's behavior and thinking patterns were when they were a child. This knowledge is necessary as autism is a developmental condition meaning it is not something you can catch.

You do not know if the "aspie" behaviors you are observing is caused by autism. Many other conditions can cause behaviors associated with autism.

Now the good news.
You can observe a pattern of behaviors associated with autism and with the proper knowledge have decent reasons to SUSPECT another person is autistic.

Now the bad news
That is as far as it goes unless you have autistic diagnostic savant skills that the rest of us mortals and autism experts have not discovered yet.


Of course not, I'd never be bold enough to tell myself anyone was on the spectrum if I didn't have definitive proof. I don't generally count it as a "spotting" until my suspicions are confirmed by the arrival of a labeled autism service dog, or a Facebook post by a parent, to name a couple of very specific examples.


_________________
Hardcore visual stimmer and daydreamer since 2000
AQ : 40


nick007
Veteran
Veteran

User avatar

Joined: 4 May 2010
Age: 35
Gender: Male
Posts: 20,190
Location: was Louisiana but now Vermont

08 Nov 2018, 5:15 am

I'm too much in my head/own world to notice others


_________________
But I don't want to go among mad people, Alice remarked.
Oh, you can't help that, said the Cat: we're all mad here. I'm mad. You're mad.
How do you know I'm mad? said Alice.
You must be, said the Cat, or you wouldn't have come here.


YoungMasterGandalf
Emu Egg
Emu Egg

User avatar

Joined: 7 Nov 2018
Age: 23
Posts: 2
Location: UK

08 Nov 2018, 11:23 am

Often, though not always. Having taken it upon myself to learn a lot about my condition and how it affects me, I find that I sometimes see similar traits in others. In many cases, I pick up immediately whether somebody is on the spectrum or not, usually when there are numerous signs that are too telltale to be a coincidence.

Sometimes, though, I am surprised when I learn about people I know being on the spectrum. Seeing as autism doesn't have a 'look' and that everybody with the condition is unique, it's not always apparent who is one of us and who is not.



Dear_one
Veteran
Veteran

User avatar

Joined: 2 Feb 2008
Age: 69
Gender: Male
Posts: 2,105
Location: Where the Great Plains meet the Northern Pines

10 Nov 2018, 1:25 pm

I spotted one just by his postings, despite a normal-looking life except for his field of self employment.



blazingstar
Veteran
Veteran

User avatar

Joined: 19 Nov 2017
Age: 64
Gender: Female
Posts: 756

10 Nov 2018, 5:54 pm

This is not diagnostic, but I generally sense autism within a few minutes of an interaction or observation. I am not looking for it, I am not observing specific traits. It just stands out to me quickly. I learn by patterns and worked with autists for years before knowing I was on the spectrum. I am not picking out people by environmental cues either. Shopping, airports, my backyard, car rental venues anywhere. Of course I don't know if I "miss" some. It isn't something I think about. It just happens.


_________________
There's a knife in the wind tonight and my heart is clean.
I awaken at the urging of a long, slow dream.
I arise from my bed of ages in the hollow hills,
On the night when the moon howls and the wolves are still.


Michael Hough